Topic: Guale

Guale Tribe

Guale Indians. The Indian name by which the Spaniards knew the present Amelia island, north coast of Florida, and a part of the adjacent Florida and Georgia coast, in the 16th century. There is strong probability that the tribe in occupancy was that known later as Yamasi. In 1597 the son of the chief of Guale led a revolt against the missions that had been established by the Spanish Franciscans a few years before. There were then on the island at least 3 mission villages, Asao, Asopo, and Ospo. The missions were re-established in 1605 and may have continued until their destruction by the English and their Indian allies in 1704-06. For Further Study: The following articles and manuscripts will shed much more light on the Guale as both an ethnological study, and as a people. Guale Indians, by Henry Schoolcraft The Yamasee War, by Swanton Guale Tribe and Yamasee Tribe, by Swanton Mission Santa Catalina de Guale, by Richard Thornton Yamassi Indians, by...

Read More

The Yamasee War

In 1715 the Yamasee war broke out, the most disastrous of all those which the two Carolina settlements had to face. The documents of South Carolina show clearly that the immediate cause of this uprising was the misconduct of some English traders, but it is evident that the enslavement of Indians, carried on by Carolina traders in an ever more open and unscrupulous manner, was bound to produce such an explosion sooner or later. The best contemporary narratives of this revolt are to be found in “An Account of Missionaries Sent to South Carolina, the Places to Which They Were Appointed, Their Labours and Success, etc.,” and in “An Account of the Breaking Out of the Yamassee War, in South Carolina, extracted from the Boston News, of the 13th of June, 1715,” both contained in Carroll’s Historical Collections of South Carolina. 1Vol. II, pp. 538-576. The following is from the first of these documents: In the year 1715, the Indians adjoining to this colony, all round from the borders of Fort St. Augistino to Cape Fear, had formed a conspiracy to extirpate the white people. This war broke out the week before Easter [actually on April 15]. The parish of St. Helen’s had some apprehensions of a rising among the adjoining Indians, called the Yammosees. On Wednesday before Easter, Captain Nairn, agent among the Indians, went, with some others,...

Read More

Guale Tribe and Yamasee Tribe

The coast of what is now the State of Georgia, from Savannah River as far as St. Andrews Sound, was anciently occupied by a tribe or related tribes which, whatever doubts may remain regarding the people just considered, undoubtedly belonged to the Muskhogean stock. 1See pp. 14-16. This region was known to the Spaniards as “the province of Guale (pronounced Wallie),” but most of the Indians living there finally became merged with a tribe known as the Yamasee, and it will be well to consider the two together. From a letter of one of the Timucua missionaries we learn that the Guale province was called Ybaha by the Timucua Indians, 2Lowery, MSS. and this is evidently the Yupaha of which De Soto was in search when he left the Apalachee. “Of the Indians taken in Napetuca, ” says Elvas, “the treasurer, Juan Gaytan, brought a youth with him, who stated that he did not belong to that country, but to one afar in the direction of the sun’s rising, from which he had been a long time absent visiting other lands; that its name was Yupaha, and was governed by a woman, the town she lived in being of astonishing size, and many neighboring lords her tributaries, some of whom gave her clothing, others gold in quantity.” 3Bourne, Narr. of De Soto, I, pp. 50-51. As the description of...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest