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Topic: Geography

Geography of the Ocmulgee-Altamaha River Basin

Along with the Oconee River, the Ocmulgee River is a major tributary of the Altamaha River System. Although little known outside of Georgia, the Altamaha is the third largest river on the Atlantic Coast. The Ocmulgee is 225 miles long from its beginning in the Georgia Piedmont to its confluence with the Oconee River in Southeast Georgia near Lumber City. The Altamaha continues another 140 miles to the coast at the old colonial port of Darien. The largest tributaries of the Ocmulgee begin on the eastern edge of the Atlanta Metropolitan Area. They include the Alcovy, South and Yellow...

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Geographical Names of the Norwich VT Locality

Of the little settlements in the township of Norwich which seem to be existing in the sunset of their former glory, may be mentioned Beaver Meadow, or West Norwich. This place presents a notable instance of that decline in population and decay of business interests in a rural community, of which Vermont affords many examples since the advent of railroads and the fever of western emigration set in. For more than thirty years population, wealth, and enterprise have been drifting away from that section of the town. Probably the settlement reached the height of its prosperity previous to 1840. During the decade that preceded this date two churches were built here, a Baptist church in 1835, and Methodist church about two years later. Regular meetings were held, and full congregations gathered from the immediate neighborhood. Large families of children filled the schools, to the number of sixty pupils of a winter, sometimes. The village had for many years its well-stocked country store, and a variety of mechanics’ shops. Intelligent and thrifty farmers cultivated the productive farms. Before 1850 the exodus commenced. The Baptist society had its last settled minister in 1869, and a few years later, the church having become nearly extinct, the meeting house was taken down, and the lumber used to build a parsonage for the Baptist church in Sharon village. Four years earlier the Methodists had...

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Map of part of North America from Cape Charles to the Mouth of the River Mississipi

Captain John Barnwell, otherwise known as Tuscarora Jack, was a well known frontier settler who was active in the 1711 Tuscarora War. His travels throughout the Southeast enabled him to draw a relatively accurate map of the area of his travels and exploration, some from second hand information, but most from first hand. For researchers of the Southeast this map is critical, and never before seen online in such a large form as to be able to read the hand writing and personal descriptions and historical details as outlined by Barnwell. In order to view this map in a form that made it legible you had to travel to one of the two locations the actual versions exist.

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Sauthier’s 1779 Map of New York

Sauthier’s map of New York summarizes much of the British military mapping done in the years preceding the revolution. Sautier himself typifies the multi-cultural staff of the British corps of engineers. Born in Strasbourg, Sautier practiced surveying in his native Alsace. He was eventually employed by Governor Tyron in 1776, and appointed surveyor for the Province of New York in 1773. As surveyor for New York he was involved in determining the disputed boundaries of the province.  After 1776 he was employed as a military surveyor. In compiling this map Sauthier drew on his detailed surveys, as well as on the surveys of Bernard Ratzer, another important surveyor and map maker in the years preceding the Revolution. Predictably, Sauthier’s map focuses on New York’s boundaries, including an area disputed between New York and New Jersey, and New York’s extensive claims in what is now Vermont. Depicted in this map are the locations of Indian villages, Jesuit missions, and the names of many proprietors of vast tracts of claimed New York...

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Map of Zwaanendael

Nautical chart of Zwaanendael (“Swanendael”) and Godyn’s Bay in New Netherland. Zwaanendael was a patroonship founded by Samuel Godyn, a director of the Dutch West India Company, in 1629. Godyn made his land claim to the West India Company under jurisdiction of the Charter of Freedoms and Exemptions. After a short time, the initial 32 inhabitants were murdered by local Indians and Godyn sold his land back to the West India Company. The West India Company kept the names of the local area, including Godyn’s Bay, which eventually became Delaware Bay. The text in Dutch at left side of...

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Map Making, from Majorca to Appalachia

From the moment that Europeans learned that a New World existed across the waters of the Atlantic, map makers in Western Europe began turning maps of that New World. At first these maps were grossly inaccurate and assumed the either the Americas were part of the Orient or merely consisted of islands off the shores of Asia. As more and more log books and navigation charts were returned to Spain, Portugal, France and England by explorers, the maps grew more precise.

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John Mitchell’s Map

The Mitchell Map remained the most detailed map of North America available in the later eighteenth century. Various impressions (and also French copies) were directly used to help establish the boundaries of the new United States of America by diplomats at the Treaty of Paris (1783) that ended the American Revolutionary War. The map’s inaccuracies subsequently led to a number of border disputes, such as in Maine. Its supposition that the Mississippi extended north to the 50th parallel (into British territory) resulted in the treaty using it as a landmark for a geographically impossible definition of the border in...

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Historical Maps of the United States

Other then adding a splash of color to a web page, maps provide the researcher valuable clues to historic why’s. Here at AccessGenealogy we believe early maps play a valuable role in identifying the location and names of Indian villages and towns. While not always accurate as to the actual placement of villages (especially the early American ones), maps do shed light on the tribal affiliations, the identification of the tribe by various government entities (mainly French, Spanish and British), and approximate locations. Historical Maps of the United States 1640 Virginiae et Floridae Map 1718 de L’Isle Map 1755...

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A Geospatial Analysis

As stated in Part Three, the Stratum Unlimited, LLC report in 2001 (Other Missing Stone Archaeological Sites) virtually ignored the Native American communities in northern Georgia. Almost all were contemporary with the occupation of the Track Rock Terraces. This omission was particularly inexcusable for the town sites that were adjacent to the two creeks, which flow off of Track Rock Gap, Town Creek and Arkaqua Creek.  In 1930s and 1940s, archaeologist George Wauchope found evidence of long term occupancy at these sites that apparently began before the Track Rock terraces were constructed, and sometimes continued into the Federal Period....

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The Southern Longleaf Pine Tree

The 160 mile long Shenandoah Valley is located in northwestern Virginia and the eastern panhandle of West Virginia. Ten counties are located in this famous valley. They are (south to north) Rockbridge, Augusta, Rockingham, Page, Shenandoah, Warren, Frederick and Clarke Counties in Virginia, plus Berkeley and Jefferson Counties in West Virginia. The main Shenandoah River is formed by the North Fork of the Shenandoah and South Fork of the Shenandoah that join in Front Royal, VA. They are created by tributaries in the central mountains of Virginia. The Shenandoah River and all its tributaries flow northeastward through the Great Appalachian Valley to join the Potomac River at Harpers Ferry, WV. Most creeks, feeding these rivers flow from west to east or east to west. Throughout its entire path, the Shenandoah is clear and relatively shallow. In between the North and South Forks of the Shenandoah River is the Massanutten Mountain Range and Fort Valley. This football shaped valley is surrounded on all sides by steep slopes. George Washington planned to make his last stand here, if the British Army conquered most of the colonies. Fort Valley has few permanent residents other than retirees, because it is so difficult for children to attend public schools. Very few tourists are even aware that isolated window into the past even exists. The entire river system flows through sedimentary rocks. Dolomitic limestone predominates....

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Elahsa

Elahsa (‘village of the great willows’). A former Hidatsa village on the north bank of Knife River, North Dakota, about 3 miles from Missouri River. Alternate Spellings: Biddahtsi-Awatiss – Maxmillian, Voy. dans l’int de l’Am. III, 3, 1843. Eláh-sá – Maxmillian, Trav., 178, 1843. Hidatsa – Matthews, Ethnog. Hidatsa, 38,...

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Aucocisco

The name of the territory about Casco Bay and Presumpscot River, in the area now included in Cumberland County, Maine. It was also sometimes applied to those Abnaki Indians by whom it was occupied. Since the section was settled at an early date by the whites, the name soon dropped out of use as applied to the Indians, or rather it was changed to “Casco,” but this was a mere local designation, not a tribal distinction, as the Indians referred to were Abnaki. The proper form of the word is given by Willis as Uh-kos-is-co, ‘crane’ or ‘heron,’ the first syllable being guttural. These birds still frequent the bay. It is said by Willis to have been the Indian name of Falmouth (Portland),...

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Kosotshe

Kosotshe. A former village of the Tututni, identified by Dorsey with the Luckkarso nation of Lewis and Clark, who placed them on the Oregon coast south of the Kusan territory in 1805, and estimated their population at 1,200.  Fifty years later Kautz said their village was on Flores Creek, Oregon. Dorsey fixed their habitat north of Rogue River between Port Orford and Sixes Creek. 1Hodge, Handbook of American Indians, 728, 1907. The Shalalahs, of whom we know nothing except their numbers, which are computed at 1,200 souls. Then follow: The Luckasos 2The Luckasos, elsewere Luckkarsos, are known only through Lewis and Clark. The name is probably from Yu-qais´, an Alsea village (Yakonian family). , of about the same number; and The Hannakalals, whom we estimate at 600 souls. 3Lewis, Coules, Clark and Jefferson; History of the expedition under the command of Lewis and Clark, 761, 1893. Lukkarso, 1,200 in 1820, Coast of the Pacific, South of Columbia River, beyond the Shallalah. 4Drake, The Aboriginal Races of North America, 12, 1859. In connexion with the subject of Indian treaties, I will here remark, that it is peculiarly unfortunate that so much delay occurs in getting the decision of the President and Senate upon the treaties negotiated with the Oregon Indians. It is exceedingly difficult—nay, impossible— to convey to them intelligibly the causes of delay on my part in fulfilling the...

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Guacata

Guacata – An inland Calusa village on Lake “Mayaimi” or Okechobee, south Florida, about 1570. Elsewhere in his memoir Fontaneda refers to it as a distinct but subordinate tribe. 1Hodge, Handbook of American Indians, 508, 1907. Guacata, Cuacata – In one place Fontaneda speaks of this as a town on Lake Mayaimi (Okeechobee) and elsewhere as one of the provinces of the east coast. A Spanish document in the Lowery collection gives it as a place “in the land of Ays.” It is possible that these people lived on St. Lucie River and camped farther inland than most of...

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