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Topic: French and Indian War

Descendants of Charles Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now For the ancestry of Charles Keith, please see Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts (VI) Charles Keith, son of Benjamin, was born Aug. 8, 1794, and married Dec. 8, 1817, Mehitable Perkins, born March 23, 1795, daughter of Josiah and Anna (Reynolds) Perkins, of North Bridgewater, both of whom were descendants of historic old New England families. To this union were born children as follows: Damaris Williams Keith, born Oct. 8, 1818, married Vinal Lyon, of North Bridgewater, where she died; Charles Perkins Keith,...

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Indian Wars of New England

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now To the student of Indian history of the early New England period the catalog of the librarian would allow one to infer that the ground had been already preempted by Mr. William Hubbard and some other well-known writers upon the tragedies of the early New England days, whose labors are more famous for being a quaint reflection of the times than for comprehensive treatment of the subject at hand. Without Mr. Drake’s labors, allied to those of Church and Belknap, the earlier story would be a...

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Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now From 1860 to 1930 The Connecticut Historical Society published a series containing items from their collection of historical documents. The following are the 24 volumes of their works freely made available online. To assist the researcher with determining the contents for each volume, we’ve included such in the description. Connecticut genealogists will want to pay particular attention to Volumes 8-10, 12, 14, and 22. Willis and Wyllys family researchers, who descend from George Wyllys will be ecstatic over volume 21. And to our Native American friends,...

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Captivity of John Fitch – Indian Captivities

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Particulars Relating to the Captivity of John Fitch, of Ashby, Mass. Related by Mr. Enos Jones, of Ashburnham. The town of Lunenburg, in Massachusetts, was incorporated August 1, 1728, and received its name in compliment to George II., who, the preceding year, came to the British throne, and was styled Duke of Lunenburg, having in his German dominions a town of that name. On the 3d of February, 1764, a part of Lunenburg was detached and incorporated as a distinct town by the name of Fitchburg. In 1767, a part of Fitchburg was dis-annexed to aid in forming the town of Ashby. Mr. John Fitch lived on the frontiers of the county, in the tract now included in Ashby. After the commencement of the French and Indian war of 1745, Fitch proposed to the government to keep a garrison, with the aid of three soldiers, who were immediately dispatched to him. Mr. Fitch was a gentleman of much enterprise, and had had considerable dealings with the Indians in peltries, furs, &c., and was generally well known among them. Soon after the breaking out of the war, they determined to make him a prisoner; and in July, 1746-7, they came into the vicinity to the number of about eighty. The inhabitants of the garrison were Fitch, his...

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The French and Indian War from 1754 to 1759 – Beaver Wars

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now After the peace, concluded between France and England in 1748, the French, excluded from the Atlantic coast of North America, designed to take possession of the country further west, and for this purpose, commenced to build a chain of forts to connect the St. Lawrence and the Mississippi rivers. The English, to prevent this scheme from being carried into action, formed an Ohio company, to whom a considerable extent of country was granted by the English government. Upon hearing of this, the governor of Canada notified...

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Genealogy of Henry Austin, Sr.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Henry Austin, Sr., son of Samuel Austin and Elizabeth Marshall. More records are existant on this Austin. In 1758 in Albemarle Co., Virginia, he married Sarah Harrison, probable relation to Richard Harrison. A few years after marriage, Henry received two hundred acres of land in Virginia for his services in Lord John Murray Dunmore’s War. He served as a sergeant in that war; for his services in the French and Indian War, he received another land parcel. In 1790 his neighbors were John Rodes and William Austin, his brother. During that year there were nine in Henry’s family; there were his dwelling and four other buildings on his plantation. “In 1795 Henry Austin conveyed a parcel of land to Thomas Stribling, Samuel Wills, Joseph Hardesty, Bennis Brown, Daniel Maupin, John Gibson, George Bringham, William Oliver and Basil Guess, of Organe, for a church which was then called Austin’s Meeting House, and is no doubt the same as that now known as Bingham’s Church…” (Hist. of Albemarle Co., Va.) The third day of October 1821 Henry Austin wrote his will; it was just under fifty years previous, that Henry had enlisted in the Virginia Militia during the War of the Rebellion. He served as a Lieutenant under the command of General Nelson. Henry was one of the three thousand...

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Biographical Sketch of Capt. Hart

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Capt. Hart was a native of the State of New Jersey, where, during the French and Indian war, previous to the American Revolution, he raised a company of men and was commissioned Captain. He was with General Wolf’s army at the battle of Quebec, in Canada, in 1759, where that gallant young general fell. Capt. Hart’s company behaved with great gallantry on that occasion, and the men, who were dressed in blue uniforms, were afterward known as the “Jersey Blues.” Honest John Hart, as he was called, was a son of Capt. Hart, and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Nathaniel, the fourth son of Honest John Hart, settled in Mason County, Ky., in 1795. His son, also named Nathaniel, was born May 5, 1794, and came to Missouri in 1819. He settled first in St. Charles County, where he remained one year, and then, in 1820, removed to Warren County, and settled near Pinckney; where, on March 6th, 1823, he was married to Unity L. Marshall, daughter of John Marshall, of Montgomery County, Ky., who was one of the first settlers of Warren County. Mr. Hart is now living in Boone County, in his 83’d year. He had several children, but they all died in infancy, except two sons, Joseph E. and...

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Brief History of the French and Indian War

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Most histories of the French and Indian War make little mention of events in the Southeast during this period.  The primary reason is that European armies did not battle each other in the South. The bulk of the bloodshed in the Southeast occurred in battles between colonial militias and Great Britain’s former ally, the Cherokees. In contrast, the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia lost over 90% of its population during the French and Indian War, while the British settlements in northern New York temporarily ceased to exist....

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The Pottawatomie of Kansas

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The history of the Pottawatomie, even after they were in communication with the Europeans, is difficult and often obscure. Their name signifies People of the place of the fire. They came to be generally known as the “Fire Nation.” There is reason to believe that the Pottawatomie, the Chippewa, and the Ottawa originally formed one tribe. As one people they lived in that country about the upper shores of Lake Huron. The separation into three parts probably occurred there, and the Jesuits found them at Sault...

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The Delaware in Kansas

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In 1682, the seat of the Delaware government was at Shackamaxon, now Germantown, Pennsylvania. There Penn found them and made his famous treaty with them. Although extremely warlike, they had surrendered their sovereignty to the Iroquois about 1720. They were pledged to make no war, and they were forbidden to sell land. All the causes of this step were not known. Because of it the Iroquois claimed to have made women of the Delaware. They freed themselves of this opprobrium in the French and Indian War. The...

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