Topic: Freedmen

Cleveland County North Carolina Colored Apprentices

A list of Colored Apprentices that have been indentured in the County Court of Cleveland County since May 1866 Underage children who were not or could not be supported by their parents or were orphans were apprenticed by Freedmen’s Bureau officials to persons who would be responsible for their upbringing and welfare. Cleveland County North Carolina Colored Apprentices 1866-1867 Year Term Masters Names Apprentices Names 1866 May 7 Eliza Weber Mary McAfee 1866 May 8 J. W. Tracy Sarah Jane Watts 1866 Aug 11 Elisha McBrayer Joe McBrayer 1866 Aug 11 Elisha McBrayer Edmund Birchett 1866 Aug 11 Elisha McBrayer Henry Birchett 1866 Aug 11 Elisha McBrayer Susa Birchett 1866 Nov 7 Samuel Posten Harris Posten 1866 Nov 7 James London Cephas Grigg 1866 Nov 7 Daniel Posten Horace Posten 1866 Nov 9 Elijah Eskridge Albert Eskridge 1866 Nov 10 L. N. Durham Will Culver 1866 Nov 10 L. N. Durham Fanny Culver 1866 Nov 10 Tom McSwain Jerry McSwain 1867 Feb 4 W. J. T. Miller Martin Miller 1867 Feb 4 David Evans Julian Cline (female) 1867 Feb 5 J. G. Webb Hilliary Thompson 1867 Feb 7 R. M. Roark Rufus Suford 1867 May 6 J. W. Tracy Rhoda & Donna Bordley 1867 May 8 F. L. Hoke Lucy Bordley 1867 Aug 5 D. Whisnant Dick Hall 1867 Aug 5 James A. Wray Charlotte Hall 1867 Aug 9...

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Biography of Rev. William Butler

Rev. William Butler (B. 1859), pastor of St. Paul Presbyterian Church at Eagletown, and of Forest Church near Red River south of Millerton, is a native of the community in which he still lives. His parents, Abraham and Nellie Butler, were the slaves of Pitchlyn and Howell, Choctaws; and William was about seven, when freedom was accorded the family in 1866. His home and work as a minister until recently have been in localities remote from the railway and good schools. The short period of one and a half months was all the time he ever went to school. He learned to read by a regular attendance at Sabbath school, and by private study at the fireside. The Bible and the Shorter Catechism were the books that occupied his spare time and attention. As a natural result, he became a Christian and united with the Church at an early age. In 1885, at the age of twenty-six, he was ordained an elder in the St. Paul Presbyterian Church. He then began to read the Bible to the congregation and to hold religious meetings. While preparing himself for the work then in hand, he was led to see the great need of more teachers and preachers for the colored people, and, believing he could render efficient service as a minister, he undertook a special course of reading and instruction under...

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The Choctaw Freedmen and Oak Hill Industrial Academy

The aim of the Author in preparing this volume has been to put in a form, convenient for preservation and future reference, a brief historical sketch of the work and workers connected with the founding and development of Oak Hill Industrial Academy, established for the benefit of the Freedmen of the Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory, by the Presbyterian Church, U. S. A., in 1886, when Miss Eliza Hartford became the first white teacher, to the erection of Elliott Hall in 1910, and its dedication in 1912; when the name of the institution was changed to “The Alice Lee Elliott Memorial.”

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Voices from the Black Belt

In a discussion of the Negro problem it is eminently appropriate the Freedman and his neighbor be accorded the privilege of expressing their respective views. The thoughts expressed in this chapter have been gleaned principally from the columns of the Afro-American, a colored weekly, published by the faculty of Biddle University, Charlotte, North Carolina. The problem of the Negro relates to his capacity for improvement and self-support. Is the American Negro, after centuries of slavery that kept the race in an infantile condition, capable of development and self support? Over this question the people of our country have expressed differing opinions, many insisting that the servant condition is the better one for the American Negro. The Presbyterian Standard, published at Charlotte, N. C., a section of country in which the latter sentiment still prevails, recently bore this testimony to their progress. “While it is true of them as a mass that they are an infantile race, it is not true of them in many individual cases. There are thousands of them, who have advanced wonderfully during the last fifty years. They have made progress in every line. They are owning more farms every year, and in our cities they are buying homes, which sometimes would do credit to a more enlightened people. Their Churches are not only built in better taste, but their preachers are becoming better educated, and...

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The Public School System

The public school is the general and permanent agency for the education and uplift of the colored people. Religious and independent schools may do a splendid work in their several localities, but the public school is intended to be state-wide. It alone reaches the masses of colored children, and it should receive its due share of the public funds. The fact that they have not received any thing like a fair share of the public funds, for their equipment and support, has already been stated. This, to a great extent, is an act of injustice. Conditions however are gradually...

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“Problem of the Negro”

The “Problem of the Negro” is an old and familiar phrase. It relates to the fact, that, however many and great have been the benefits derived from his labor and loyalty, the best management of him has been a troublesome problem to the statesmen of this country, ever since the declaration of independence, and especially the Freedman, since his emancipation.

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