Topic: Delaware

Land in Adam and Logon list which has been claimed by Cherokee citizens

Exhibit A Land in Adam and Logon list which has been claimed by Cherokee citizens other than Delaware, as shown by attempts to file thereon. Where land has been claimed by more than one Cherokee only the original claim is shown on this list. NOTE: After you find your ancestor listed on this page, you should take the the Card Number, and go to the Final Roll Database and search there. No Card No Surname Given Name Middle Name Total Acres 1 Cher 17 Thompson Milton K. 230.00 2 Cher 7033 Blackstone Robert D. 210.00 3 Cher 9585 Colston Sterling 330.00 4 Cher 5432 Byrd Jane 60.00 5 Cher 5458 Waller Goldie J. 30.00 6 Cher 5458 Waller William T.H. 30.00 7 Cher 5458 Waller George W. 10.00 8 Cher 584 Atkins Andrew C. 40.00 9 Cher 346 Bryant Benjamin F. 20.00 10 Cher 346 Bryant Leona 20.00 11 Cher 4235 Jordan Isaac H. 10.00 12 Cher 7012 Blackstone Pleasant N. 80.00 13 Cher 4294 Morrison Robert T. Jr. 50.00 14 Cher 4294 Morrison Ellen C. 80.00 15 Cher 4294 Morrison Claud A. 10.00 16 Cher 1013 Bradford Tessie 73.84 17 Cher 1013 Bradford Jennetta 80.00 18 Cher 1013 Bradford Malissa 80.00 19 Cher 1013 Bradford Deatrus 80.00 20 Cher 4230 Lannom Harold D 40.00 21 Cher 5424 Rogers Ruth E. 40.00 22 Cher 5424 Rogers Maud E. 40.00...

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Biography of Francis Alexander Neilson

Francis A. Neilson was born in Oxford, Mississippi, June 2, 1860, eighth child in a family of twelve of W. S. Neilson, a prominent merchant of Oxford, and before the war a very wealthy man. Francis A. received his education at the State University, leaving his sophomore year at the age of twenty-one, after which he began a mercantile life as book-keeper in a large general merchandise store in Oxford, and remained in this occupation for three years. In 1885 the subject of our sketch went West to Arkansas City, Kansas, and there formed a partnership in the hardware business, but this becoming uncongenial Mr. Neilson went to Bartholsville, Indian Territory, and entered the employment of J. H. Bartles, as book-keeper, and remained three years. In March 1888, he was married to Ella May Pratt, stepdaughter to J. H. Bartles, and immediately moved to Claremore, where he engaged in the mercantile business, which he still continues successfully. Mrs. Neilson’s father was Lucius B. Pratt, eldest son of Rev. John G. Pratt, of an old Boston family, and many years agent to the Delawares. Her mother was Miss Nannie May “Journey Cake,” daughter of Rev. Charles J. Journey Cake, present chief of the Delawares. Mrs. Neilson is a highly educated lady, and is accomplished and refined above the average of her sex. By this marriage Mr. Neilson has two children,...

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Biography of John L. Bullette

John L. Bullette was born April 10, 1852, in Wyandotte County, Kansas, third son of George Bullette and Eliza Connor. His father was of French descent and his mother of Irish descent, both possessing Indian blood. His grandparents on both sides intermarried into the Delaware tribe. In 1859 John L. attended the Baptist Mission School in Wyandotte County, where he remained until 1861, when the war broke out, and he removed with his people to the Cherokee Nation. This move was agreeable to a contract made between both tribes, wherein the Delawares purchased a right and title to the lands and funds of the Cherokees, placing themselves on an equal footing with the latter. John L. commenced farming on a small scale, and for about four years employed his time clerking at various points, until 1875, when he accepted a permanent position with J. H. Bartles, a general merchant of Bartlesville, where he continued for four years as chief clerk in the establishment. After parting on amicable terms with his employer, John L. commenced buying and shipping cattle on a small scale, and followed the business until 1880, when he engaged in the mercantile line on his own responsibility at Claremore. In the same year he married Miss Nellie Conkle, daughter of Captain Conkle, of steamboat fame. In 1881 he was nominated and elected clerk of Coowescowee district for...

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Treaty of September 17, 1818

Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at St. Mary’s, in the state of Ohio, between Lewis Cass and Duncan McArthur, commissioners of the United States, with full power and authority to hold conferences, and conclude and sign a treaty or treaties, with all or any of the tribes or nations of Indians within the boundaries of the state of Ohio, of and concerning all matters interesting to the United States and the said nations of Indians, and the sachems, chiefs, and warriors, of the Wyandot, Seneca, Shawnese, and Ottawas, tribes of Indians; being supplementary to the treaty made and concluded with the said tribes, and the Delaware, Potawatamie, and Chippewa tribes of Indians, at the foot of the Rapids of the Miami of Lake Erie, on the twenty-ninth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventeen. Article 1. It is agreed, between the United States and the parties hereunto, that the several tracts of land, described in the treaty to which this is supplementary, and agreed thereby to be granted by the United States to the chiefs of the respective tribes named therein, for the use of the individuals of the said tribes, and also the tract described in the twentieth article of the said treaty, shall not be thus granted, but shall be excepted from the cession made by the...

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Treaty of September 29, 1817

Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at the foot of the Rapids of the Miami of Lake Erie, between Lewis Cass and Duncan McArthur, commissioners of the United States, with full power and authority to hold conferences, and conclude and sign a treaty or treaties with all or any of the tribes or nations of Indians within the boundaries of the state of Ohio, of and concerning all matters interesting to the United States and the said nations of Indians on the one part; and the sachems, chiefs, and warriors, of the Wyandot, Seneca, Delaware, Shawanese, Potawatomees, Ottawas, and Chippeway tribes of Indians. Article I. The Wyandot tribe of Indians, in consideration of the stipulations herein made on the part of the United States, do hereby forever cede to the United States the lands comprehended within the following lines and boundaries: Beginning at a point on the southern shore of lake Erie, where the present Indian boundary line intersects the same, between the mouth of Sandusky bay and the mouth of Portage river; thence, running south with said line, to the line established in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, by the treaty of Greenville, which runs from the crossing place above fort Lawrence to Loramie’s store; thence, westerly, with the last mentioned line, to the eastern line of the reserve at Loramie’s store; thence, with...

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Treaty of January 21, 1785

Articles of a treaty concluded at Fort M’Intosh, the twenty-first day of January, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, between the Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, of the one Part, and the Sachems and Warriors of the Wyandot, Delaware, Chippawa and Ottawa Nations of the other. The Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States in Congress assembled, give peace to the Wyandot, Delaware, Chippewa and Ottawa nations of Indians, on the following conditions: Article 1. Three chiefs, one from among the Wyandot, and two from among the Delaware nations, shall be delivered up to the Commissioners of the United States, to be by them retained till all the prisoners, white and black, taken by the said nations, or any of them, shall be restored. Article 2. The said Indian nations do acknowledge themselves and all their tribes to be under the protection of the United States and of no other sovereign whatsoever. Article 3. The boundary line between the United States and the Wyandot and Delaware nations, shall begin at the mouth of the river Cayahoga, and run thence up the said river to the portage between that and the Tuscarawas branch of Meskingum; then down the said branch to the forks at the crossing place above Fort Lawrence; then westerly to the portage of the Big Miami, which runs into the Ohio, at the mouth of...

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Treaty of January 9, 1789

Articles of a Treaty Made at Fort Harmar, between Arthur St. Clair, Governor of the Territory of the United States North- West of the River Ohio, and Commissioner Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, for removing all Causes of Controversy, regulating Trade, and settling Boundaries, with the Indian Nations in the Northern Department, of the one Part; and the Sachems and Warriors of the Wiandot, Delaware, Ottawa, Chippewa, Pattawatima and Sac Nations, on the other Part. Article 1. Whereas the United States in Congress assembled, did, by their Commissioners George Rogers Clark, Richard Butler, and Arthur Lee, Esquires, duly appointed for that purpose, at a treaty holden with the Wiandot, Delaware, Ottawa and Chippewa nations, at Fort M’Intosh, on the twenty-first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, conclude a peace with the Wyandot, Delaware, Ottawa and Chippewa, and take them into their friendship and protection: And whereas at the said treaty it was stipulated that all prisoners that had been made by those nations, or either of them, should be delivered up to the United States. And whereas the said nations have now agreed to and with the aforesaid Arthur St. Clair, to renew and confirm all the engagements they had made with the United States of America, at the before mentioned treaty, except so far as are altered...

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Treaty of August 3, 1795

Treaty of August 3, 1795, also known as the Treaty of Greenville. The Treaty of Greenville set a precedent for objectives in future treaties with Native Americans — that is, obtaining cessions of land, advancing the frontier through white settlement, and obtaining more cessions through treaties. With the tribes’ surrender of most of Ohio, settlers began entering in Northwest Territory in greater numbers. In the near future, more treaties would further diminish Indians’ territory. A treaty of peace between the United States of America and the Tribes of Indians, called the Wyandot, Delaware, Shawanoe, Ottawa, Chipewa, Putawatime, Miami, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia.

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Treaty of September 8, 1815

A Treaty between the United States of America and the Wyandot, Delaware, Seneca, Shawanoe, Miami, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatimie Tribes of Indians, residing within the limits of the State of Ohio, and the Territories of Indiana and Michigan. Whereas the Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatimie, tribes of Indians, together with certain bands of the Wyandot, Delaware, Seneca, Shawanoe, and Miami tribes, were associated with Great Britain in the late war between the United States and that power, and have manifested a disposition to be restored to the relations of peace and amity with the said States; and the President of the United States having appointed William Henry Harrison, late a Major General in the service of the United States, Duncan M’Arthur, late a Brigadier in the service of the United States, and John Graham, Esquire, as Commissioners to treat with the said tribes; the said Commissioners and the Sachems, Headmen, and Warriors, of said tribes having met in Council at the Spring Wells, near the city of Detroit, have agreed to the following Articles, which, when ratified by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, shall be binding on them and the said tribes: Article 1. The United States give peace to the Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatimie, tribes. Article 2. They also agree to restore to the said Chippewa, Ottawa, and...

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Treaty of September 30, 1809

A treaty between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Putawatimies, Miamies and Eel River Miamies. James Madison, President of the United States, by William Henry Harrison, governor and commander-in-chief of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for treating with the said Indian tribes, and the Sachems, Head men and Warriors of the Delaware, Putawatame, Miami and Eel River tribes of Indians, have agreed and concluded upon the following treaty; which, when ratified by the said President, with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, shall be binding on said parties. Article 1. The Miami and Eel River tribes, and the Delawares and Putawatimies, as their allies, agree to cede to the United States all that tract of country which shall be included between the boundary line established by the treaty of Fort Wayne, the Wabash, and a line to be drawn from the mouth of a creek called Racoon Creek, emptying into the Wabash, on the south-east side, about twelve miles below the mouth of the Vermilion river, so as to strike the boundary line established by the treaty of Grouseland, at such a distance from its commencement at the north-east corner of the Vincennes tract, as will leave the tract now ceded thirty miles wide at the narrowest place....

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Treaty With The Delaware, August 18, 1804

A treaty between the United States of America and the Delaware tribe of Indians. The Delaware tribe of Indians finding that the annuity which they receive from the United States, is not sufficient to supply them with the articles which are necessary for their comfort and convenience, and afford the means of introducing amongst them the arts of civilized life, and being convinced that the extensiveness of the country they possess, by giving an opportunity to their hunting parties to ramble to a great distance from their towns, is the principal means of retarding this desirable event; and the United States being desirous to connect their settlements on the Wabash with the state of Kentucky: therefore the said United States, by William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and their commissioner plenipotentiary for treating with the Indian tribes northwest of the Ohio river; and the said tribe of Indians, by their sachems, chiefs, and head warriors, have agreed to the following articles, which when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall be binding on the said parties. ARTICLE I. The said Delaware tribe, for the considerations hereinafter mentioned, relinquishes to the United States forever, all their right and title to the tract of country which lies between the Ohio and Wabash rivers,...

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Treaty of June 7, 1803

Articles of a treaty between the United States of America, and the Delaware, Shawanoe, Putawatimie, Miamie, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia nations of Indians. Articles of a treaty made at Fort Wayne on the Miami of the Lake, between William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for concluding any treaty or treaties which may be found necessary with any of the Indian tribes north west of the Ohio, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Shawanoe, Putawatimie, Miami and Kickapoo, by their chiefs and head warriors, and those of the Eel River, Weea, Piankashaw and Kaskaskia by their agents and representatives Tuthinipee, Winnemac, Richerville and Little Turtle (who are properly authorized by the said tribes) of the other part. Article 1. Whereas it is declared by the fourth article of the treaty of Greenville, that the United States reserve for their use the post of St. Vincennes and all the lands adjacent to which the Indian titles had been extinguished: And whereas, it has been found difficult to determine the precise limits of the said tract as held by the French and British governments: it is hereby agreed, that the boundaries of the said tract shall be as follow: Beginning at Point Coupee on the Wabash, and running thence by...

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Treaty with the Delaware, July 4, 1866

Articles of agreement between the United States and the chiefs and councilors of the Delaware Indians, on behalf of said tribe, made at the Delaware Agency, Kansas, on the fourth day of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-six. Whereas Congress has by law made it the duty of the President of the United States to provide by treaty for the removal of the Indian tribes from the State of Kansas; and whereas the Delaware Indians have expressed a wish to remove from their present reservation in said State to the Indian country, located between the States of Kansas and Texas; and whereas the United States have, by treaties negotiated with the Choctaws and Chickasaws, with the Creeks, and with the Seminoles, Indian tribes residing in said Indian country, acquired the right to locate other Indian tribes within the limits of the same; and whereas the Missouri River Railroad Company, a corporation existing in the State of Kansas by the laws thereof, and which company has built a railroad connecting with the Pacific Railroad, from near the mouth of the Kaw River to Leavenworth, in aid of which road the Delawares, by treaty in eighteen hundred and sixty-four, agreed to dispose of their lands, has expressed a desire to purchase the present Delaware Indian reservation in the said State, in a body, at a fair price: It is hereby agreed between...

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Treaty With The Delaware, July 2, 1861

Whereas a treaty or agreement was made and concluded at Leavenworth City, Kansas, on the second day of July, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, between the United States of America and the Delaware tribe of Indians, relative to certain lands of that tribe conveyed to the Leavenworth, Pawnee, and Western Railroad Company, and to bonds executed to the United States by the said company for the payment of the said Indians, which treaty or agreement, with the preliminary and incidental papers necessary to the full understanding of the same, is in the following words, to wit: Whereas, by the treaty of May 30, 1860, between the United States and the Delaware tribe of Indians, it is provided that the surplus lands of said Delawares, not included in their “home reserve,” should be surveyed and appraised under direction of the Secretary of the Interior; and that in order to aid in the construction of a railroad near and through their said “home reserve,” the Leavenworth, Pawnee, and Western Railroad Company of Kansas, duly organized and incorporated under the laws of said Territory, should have the right to purchase such surplus lands at such appraised value—on condition, however, that after paying for said lands, said company should only receive title to one-half of them on completing and equipping, within a reasonable time, twenty-five (25) miles of said railroad from Leavenworth...

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Treaty With The Delaware, August 3, 1829

Articles of agreement made between John M’Elvain, thereto specially authorized by the President of the United States, and the band of Delaware Indians, upon the Sandusky River, in the State of Ohio, for the cession of a certain reservation of land in the said State. Article 1. The said band of Delaware Indians cede to the United States the tract of three miles square, adjoining the Wyandot reservation upon the Sandusky river, reserved for their use by the treaty of the Rapids of the Maumee, concluded between the United States and the Wyandots, Seneca, Delaware, Shawnees, Potawatamies, Ottawas, and Chippiwa tribes of Indians, on the twenty-ninth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventeen, and the said tribe of Delawares engage to remove to and join their nation on the west side of the Mississippi, on the land allotted to them, on or before the first day of January next, at which time peaceable possession of said reservation is to be given to the United States. Article 2. In consideration of the stipulations aforesaid, it is agreed, that the United States shall pay to the said band the sum of three thousand dollars: two thousand dollars in hand, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged by the undersigned Chiefs of said tribe, and the remaining balance of one thousand dollars to be...

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