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Topic: Cayuse War

Biography of Gen. Joel Palmer

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now GEN. JOEL PALMER. – There have been few men in Oregon more universally respected, or whom the people have more delighted to honor, than General Palmer. A plain, unpretentious man, who assumed absolutely nothing, he was nevertheless conscious of his superior abilities, and had no hesitancy in assuming commensurate responsibilities. For natural capacity and sagacity in great affairs, he ranks with the first men of our state, such as General Lane, Colonel Cornelius, Judge Kelly or Governor Gibbs. He reckoned himself as a New Yorker, both parents having been natives and residents of that state, although at the time of his birth they were on a temporary sojourn in Canada. His boyhood and youth were spent at the old home in the Empire state; and he early assumed the responsibilities of life, marrying, when but nineteen, Miss Catherine Caffey. Of their two children, Miss Sarah subsequently came to Oregon with her father and became the wife of Mr. Andrew Smith; and the other died in infancy, the mother not long surviving. Mr. Palmer was married again to Miss Sarah A. Derbyshire of Bucks county, Pennsylvania. That was in 1836. Soon afterwards he moved to Indiana, and, having become accustomed to the management of large works, took a contract to build portions of the White Water canal,...

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Biography of Thomas T. Redsull

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Great, indeed, have been the changes that time and man have wrought since Thomas T. Redsull landed on the Pacific coast. California yet belonged to Mexico, and much of the land, especially in the southern part of the state, was divided into large estates, owned and occupied by Spanish families. Mr. Redsull was then but eleven years of age, yet had started out to make his own way in the world. He was born in the County of Kent, England, on the 15th of November, 1827, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Goymer) Redsull, both of whom were natives of England and representatives of ancient families of that country. They were both members of the Episcopal Church, and the father was a collector of excise for the government. He departed this life in 1858, at the age of fifty years, and his widow is now living at the age of one hundred and three years. They had seven children, but only three are now living. Mr. Redsull of this review acquired his early education in England, and when only eleven years of age was bound out as an apprentice to the Hudson’s Bay Company, and in their service came to the United States in 1838, landing in California. He is consequently one of the oldest pioneers...

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Biography of Samuel Kimbrough Barlow

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now SAMUEL KIMBROUGH BARLOW. – Samuel Kimbrough Barlow was born in Nicolas county, Kentucky, January 14,1795. He was of Scotch origin, and inherited many of the sterling qualities of his ancestors. His race was remarkable for an unswerving fidelity to principles of right; and on every occasion these principles were disseminated or defended by courage which sometimes almost amounted to audacity. Freedom of speech and will and progression in all things were also marked characteristics of the ancestors of S.K. Barlow. Illustrative of these features of disposition in the Barlow family, a story is told of the fearlessness of the paternal grandfather of S.K. Barlow, who, just before the breaking out of the Revolutionary war, at the time that the hot-bed of dissolution was brewing, refused to take off his hat to one of the King’s squires; and, when remonstrated with and further aggravated by the squire cheering and shouting “Hurrah for King George,” audaciously knocked him down. It was the custom, at this time, for each man to raise his hat to the King’s officers; and to known one of them down greatly increased the magnitude of the crime. This was no doubt the prime cause of the hero of this sketch being born in Kentucky; for the old gentleman, not wishing to encounter or to...

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Biography of Hon. B. F. Burch

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now HON. B.F. BURCH. – B.F. Burch was born on the second day of May, 1825, in Chariton county, Missouri, where he lived during the first twenty years of his life, and received what was then considered a good, common-school education. It was complete enough to secure him the position of teacher for the families of Honorable Jesse Applegate and neighbors the first winter after his arrival here, – 1845-46. He also taught the first school in what is now known Polk county. In 1846, in company with Jesse Applegate, Lindsey Applegate, David Goff, William J.G. Parker, William Spotsman, John Jones, John Owens, William Wilson, Robert Smith, “Black” Harris, John Bogus, F.H. Goodhue, Levi Scott, John M. Scott and Bennett Osborne, he viewed out and located what is known as the Southern Oregon wagon road, and conducted a large number of immigrants over the new route to Oregon City, cutting the road and piloting the newcomers through the famous Umpqua caƱon. In 1847 he started to return to Missouri, but met his father and family on Bear river and came back with them over the new road. When the Oregon Volunteers were organized under Colonels Gilliam and Watters, he was adjutant of the first regiment, and served through the Cayuse war of 1847-48, participating in all the...

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Biography of Hugh L. Brown

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now HUGH L. BROWN. – There is usually something distinctive and characteristic about one who leaves the impress of his name upon any region or locality. This we find to be the case with reference to the pioneer whose name appears above, and for whom was named the well-known city of Brownsville. Hugh Leeper Brown was born in Knox county, Tennessee, January 24, 1810. He lived in Knox county until 1838, when with his little family, then consisting of his wife and three children, he emigrated to Missouri, settling in Platte county. He remained there until the spring of 1846, when falling in with that stream of pioneers who had turned their faces towards the settling sun, he again pulled up stakes, and taking the loved ones started forth with an ox-team and crossed the plains, reaching the then territory of Oregon in the autumn, having occupied six months in the journey. It was by the Barlow Road that he entered the Willamette valley. From Oregon City he set out with Alexander Kirk, now deceased, and James Blakely, who still lives at Brownsville, in search of a location for a home. The best of the land was before them; and they examined it carefully, but were not fully satisfied, until passing the Calapooia, upon the majestic plain...

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Biography of Col. Cornelius Gilliam

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now COL. CORNELIUS GILLIAM. – Colonel Gilliam was a native of North Carolina, and was born in 1798. But his recollection of that state in after years was like a dream; for when but a youth he accompanied his parents to Missouri, where he lived for many years. August 31, 1820, he married Miss Mary Crawford of that state. Ten years later he was elected sheriff of Clay county for a term of two years; and at the expiration of that time he joined the Black Hawk war. In 1837 he served as captain of the company which fought all through the Seminole war. About this time trouble arose with the Mormons. The authorities decided to expel them from the state; and for that purpose volunteer were called for. Captain Gilliam came to the front, raised a company and was chosen its captain. He was soon after promoted to a colonelcy for meritorious conduct. In 1843 he represented Andrew county in the legislature. Religiously he was a free-will Baptist. In 1845 he was ordained to the ministry; and the next year he left for Oregon, arriving in the fall. He first settled in Polk county, but soon removed to Benton county, there remaining until his departure in 1847 to join the then marshaling forces for the Cayuse...

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Biography of Gen. Morton Mathew McCarver

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now GEN. MORTON MATHEW McCARVER. THE FOUNDER OF BURLINGTON, IOWA, SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA AND TACOMA, WASHINGTON,- General McCarver was born near Lexington Kentucky, January 14, 1807. Of an independent, roving spirit, determination, courage and enterprise that knew no bounds, he quit his home at the age of eighteen years and went to Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, and not finding anything congenial to his tastes returned and settled in 1830 at Galena, Illinois, where he was married to a Miss Mary Ann Jennings. He served in the Black Hawk war, and after the surrender of the great chief of the Sacs and Foxes, and as soon as the treaty between Black Hawk and the United Sates had been drafted in 1833 (by the terms of which the valuable territory now the State of Iowa was to be ceded to the United States), and before the treaty was signed, he left his home in Illinois in view of locating a city which would one day become one of the great commercial centers of the West, towards which the tide of emigration was rapidly setting. McCarver, then twenty-six years of age, journeyed down the Mississippi to a point then known as the Flint Hills; and in the evening, before crossing from the Illinois shore, he found shelter beneath the hospitable roof...

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Biography of John Birch McClain

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now JOHN BIRCH McCLAIN. – This pioneer, whose record extends to the memorable year of 1843, was born January 31, 1820, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He is the son of John and Mary Swallow McClane. At the age of twenty-two, he left Philadelphia for Texas with the purpose of assisting General Sam Houston to gain the independence of Texas. The ship, however, upon which he took passage, sailing from Delaware Bay in a storm, was delayed thirty days; and, upon his arrival in New Orleans, the young man found that Houston had withdrawn his proclamation of war against Mexico, and that he was in no need of recruits. Encountering yellow fever in the Southern city, he took passage on a Mississippi steamer, stopping off at Burlington, Iowa, and happening along at Fairfield at the time of the Indian treaty with, and the payment to, the Sacs and Foxes. Still having in mind a journey to foreign parts, he had his eye on Chili as a desirable point, and learning something of the route to Oregon, determined to make his way to the Columbia, and await a ship which would take him to South America. Arriving at the rendezvous in the spring of 1843, he found the emigrants gathering, and with them set out upon the memorable journey. He...

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Biography of Flemming R. Hill

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now FLEMMING R. HILL. – Mr. Hill’s experiences have been so varied and extensive, and his services on this coast so valuable, that we can here give but enough to serve as specimens. He was born in Overton county, Tennessee, in 1824. In 1829 he accompanied his parents west to a new home in Missouri, and in 1844, was ready for adventures of his own account. With three companions he set forth to the Rocky Mountains, but at the rendezvous left their enterprise, and joined himself as teamster to a train of emigrants bound for Oregon. The trip across the plains was varied with many exciting and amusing incidents. Being weather-bound a day at Ash Hollow, a few hours were spent in exploring a cave filled with bones, said to be those of a party of trappers killed by the Indians. At the north fork of the Platte, Mr. Hill had a very narrow escape. After the train had crossed the ford, it only remained to cross the cattle. When this was commenced, it was found that one of the company was on foot and unable to get over. Hill offered to lend him his horse, and to take the chances of crossing upon one of the cattle. The cattle entered the river by a buffalo trail,...

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Biography of Gen. John E. Ross

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now GEN. JOHN E. ROSS. – No view of our state would be complete without the figure of General Ross, who was so prominent as Indian fighter and legislator in the early days. he was born in Ohio in 1818, and after a residence in Indiana and Illinois, being married at Chicago to the daughter of Alexander Robinson of that city, whose loss by death he suffered eight years later, he came to the Pacific coast, arriving in Oregon in 1847. He was captain of a company that crossed the plains, and soon after reaching the Grande Ronde came upon some of the most distressing incidents of the immigrants’ experience. Having hurried on ahead of his train with Joseph Kline and an Englishman, he overtook, on the John Day river, the Warren company, who had just been attacked and robbed by the Indians, being even stripped of their clothing. He traded his own garments to the Indians for provisions for this destitute band, and came on with them to The Dalles, having not a cent of money at the time of his arrival. Soon after reaching the Willamette valley, the Cayuse war broke out; and he enrolled his name as one of the volunteers to avenge the massacre of the missionaries. He was second lieutenant of the...

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Biography of Capt. J. H. McMillen

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now CAPT. J.H. McMILLEN. – Captain McMillen, a fitting example of the men whose stout courage, tireless energy and ready friendliness laid the groundwork of our state, is a pioneer of 1845, having crossed the plains with W.H. Rector, Colonel Taylor, Hiram Smith and others of that large immigration. Of Scotch ancestry, he traces his American lineage to a great-grandfather who crossed the Atlantic and settled in Rhode Island, where a numerous family grew up around him. The grandfather, James, pushed westward as far as New York; and in that state Joseph, the father, was born. Arriving at maturity he married Miss Ruth Gannett and settled in Attica, New York; and in that village James H., whose life we here record, was born May 10, 1823. During the very early life of this child, a further removal was made to Lodi, now Gowanda; and in 1836, when James was coming to be a stout, active lad, a further move to the prairies was effected. It was at Orange, Du Page county, Illinois, that the new home was made and a new farm opened. Aside from his agricultural pursuits, the father was a millwright; and the son learned that trade as his reliance for future support; and it has ever served him most opportunely and honorably. It was...

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Biography of Col. James Taylor

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now COL. JAMES TAYLOR. – The immigration of 1845 was large, and furnished many of the leading men of the Northwest, among that number being Colonel James Taylor of Astoria, Oregon. Although now past eighty years of age, he is still one of the active citizens of a city which boasts of many men of energy. He is one of the fathers of the place, not only in point of time, but as owner of considerable property in the city and adjacent country, embracing the heights west of the city, which will one day be occupied with handsome residences, as they command a magnificent view of the estuary of the Columbia river, and Young’s Bay, and its beautiful rivers, also of the imperial Saddle Mountain or Swallatache, and a wide view of the main ocean beyond the Clatsop Plains. The Colonel is of Scotch and Irish descent, and was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, in 1809. When thirteen years of age his father moved west to Mansfield, Ohio, and bought a farm near by, where he spent his boyhood. The winter of 1830-31 found him teaching a six-months’ school in the neighborhood. The following summer he joined an older brother who had preceded him to Fort Findlay, now the city of Findlay, Ohio, then a wilderness, including...

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