Topic: Business

History of the Merchants of Norwich VT

Peter Olcott had a store near his residence at the Center, in the time of the Revolutionary War. Abel Curtis was for a time associated with him in this business. Stephen Burton, eldest son of Elisha Burton and a graduate of Dartmouth College in 1790, was probably the first to open trade at Norwich Plain, prior to the year 1800. Ichabod Marshall of Hanover, also a Dartmouth graduate in 1790, is understood as having been engaged in mercantile business in Norwich (possibly in partnership with Stephen Burton) for several years. Both these young men emigrated to the West early...

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W. H. Johnson & Sons

The above firm composed of W. H. Johnson and Clarence and C. P. Johnson, have done perhaps as much towards developing the resources of Grant County as any of her citizens. They are all men of sterling character and more than ordinary business ability. They settled in the Big Basin on the John Day River in 1872, and became engaged in stock rising, which they followed until 1883, they then went into the sheep business, and today own in the neighborhood of 15,000, and have about two thousand acres of land on the John Day River. In 1894 they became interested in mining in the Quartsburg district, buying out the Bardwell claims, a group of four. In 1895 they began developing, and have erected a ten-ton Crawford mill. There property has become a very valuable one. They are also interested in the Canyon City Telephone Company, running from Canyon City to Baker City, Bourne, and the Bonanza and Columbia mines, altogether about 110 miles of long distance wire, with metallic circuit, and also city exchanges, Clarence Johnson being president of the company and C. P. Johnson vice...

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Noxon Brothers Manufacturing Company

Noxon Brothers Manufacturing Company, the most extensive industry in the manufacturing line at Ingersoll, is composed of five brothers, Freeman C., James, Samuel, Stephen, and Thomas H., sons of Samuel Noxon, senior, who was born and spent his days in the County of Prince Edward, Ontario, and grandson of James Noxon, a United Empire Loyalist from Duchess County, N. Y. The grandfather settled in Prince Edward at the close of the American Revolution. The mother of these five sons was Rhoda White. They received a business education in the public schools of their native county, James, the second son, adding a few terms of study at the Jefferson County Institute, Watertown, N. Y. Samuel Noxon, senior, owned a large farm and saw mill, and as his sons had a mechanical turn of mind, he built a shop for wood work expressly for their use. In that shop they made anything to which they applied their skill farm wagons, buggies, cutters, threshing machines, &c., &c. Their hands seemed to gain the mastery, almost by intuition, of nearly every kind of mechanics tools, this being particularly the case with Freeman, James, and Samuel. In 1855 James and Samuel Noxon came to Ingersoll, Stephen following in 1865, and Freeman C. the oldest, and Thomas H. the youngest, in 1869. At first the two pioneers in this town started a foundry, and made...

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Cornwall Vermont – Mercantile

The first merchants in town were Mr. Ballard and Israel C. Jones. Joshua Stockwell, Josiah Austin, Daniel Campbell, Hosea Brooks, Israel C. Mead, Samuel Everts, William H. Remsen, P. W. Collins, Benjamin F. Haskell, Calvin M. Lewis, Ira Bingham, A. C. Wicker, Daniel Sanford, Joel S. Lane, Sylvester B. Rockwell, and the Cornwall Mercantile Company have carried on business at different periods since the beginning of the century. The only store now in town is kept by Fred S. Haskell. The building is owned by his father, Benjamin F. Haskell, grandson of Joshua Stockwell, who built the rear part before 1820 and kept here for a time in company with Daniel Sanford. B. F. Haskell, sr., followed them about 1825 and traded here for forty years, selling out to Hugh G. Bingham. About 1853 B. F. Haskell, sr., moved the building back and erected the front part as it now stands. Then he and B. F., jr., traded in company for about five years. After Hugh Bingham followed Kirk Bingham, Orren Dalrymple, Harvey Taylor, B. F. Wales, and others. Fred S. Haskell began business here in September,...

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Meyer Brothers Drug Company

St. Louis is recognized as one of the leading drug and chemical markets in the United States and also has the distinction of being the home of the largest wholesale drug house in the United States if not in the world. Meyer Brothers Drug Company was founded by Christian F. G. Meyer at Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1852. The founder came to this country from Lemforde in the kingdom of Hanover, Germany, in 1847 and consequently was in this country only a few years before entering the drug business. In 1865 the business had grown to such an extent that the founder investigated other distributing points and finally decided to establish the St. Louis branch, realizing that this city was destined to be one of the greatest distributing markets in America. The present buildings contain over three hundred thousand square feet of floor surface fronting on both Fourth street and Broadway and occupy nearly the entire block. In addition to this Meyer Brothers Drug Company occupies three other buildings which are used for warehouse purpose at 316 to 318 South Third street, 408 to 416 Elm street and the southwest corner of Fourth and Elm streets. The main building occupies the frontage on Clark avenue of two hundred and seventy-nine feet and on Fourth street one hundred and fourteen and a half feet, being built on the slow combustion...

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Deming & Hatch

Deming & Hatch, dentists, are former residents of Vt. They came to this city in Nov., 1880, and opened their present office. Their practice is extensive and...

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Tilton & Weeks

Tilton & Weeks, proprietors of livery, feed and sale barn, have stable room for thirty horses; board private rigs, and keep fine rigs for hire. They came to Dunlap from Ogle County, Ill., in 2878, and engaged in farming until entering their present business in th spring of...

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J. Franz & Co.

J. Franz & Co., brewers. The business of this firm is conducted by Mrs. M. Franz and Mrs. Kate Hensler, the widows of the former proprietors, both of whom died in the spring of 1881. The brewery was built in 1868, is 150×40 ft., and has a capacity of 10,000 barrels per year, and has bottling works connected with it, whose capacity is about 250,000 bottles per year. The foreman, John Arensdorf is a practical brewer, having learned the business at Sedan France, and is in every respect well fitted for the position, which he now holds. The financial affairs are under the charge of C.F. Hoyt and J.R. White. The firm employs about fifteen men about the...

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The Firm of Dunn & Connolly

Dunn & Connolly, attorneys at law, Charleston; this firm was established in November, 1878, and is composed of two young attorneys, but gentlemen possessing the requisite qualifications of success. Frank K. Dunn was born in Mt. Gilead, Ohio, Nov. 13, 1854, being a son of Hon. A. K. Dunn, Judge of the Court of Common Pleas; he graduated at Kenyon College, Ohio, in 1873; read law in his father’s office; entered Harvard Law School in 1874, graduating in 1875; he was admitted to practice the same year, and practiced with his father until November, 1878, when he came to Charleston, and formed the above partnership. Frank J. Connolly is a native of Morrow Co., Ohio; he was born in Chesterville, March 10, 1851; he came to Charleston in 1876; pursued his law studies in the office of his brother, Maj. James A. Connolly; was admitted to the bar in July, 1878, and formed a partnership with F. K. Dunn in November the same...

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Oliver March & Co.,

Oliver March & Co., proprietors of the Dodge City Steam Flouring Mills. These mills were erected in the fall of 1879. Size 60×90 feet, three stories and basement, built of wood at a cost of $20,000. Capacity is 15,000 pounds of flour in twenty-four hours. They employ four men. Oliver Marsh and son became proprietors in 1882. Mr. Marsh first came to Central City, Anderson Co., Kan., with his family in 1857, built a hotel and opened a general store. In 1859 he became a licensed Indian Trader with J. A. Coffey, at Humboldt, Kan., and remained until 1864, when they moved to Kansas City, Mo., and embarked in the wholesale grocery trade three years. He then went to Chetopa, Labette Co., and engaged in merchandising and the stock business for eleven years. He then came to Dodge City and engaged in the mercantile milling business. He was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, October 21, 1826; lived there with his parents for twelve years and came with them to Fort Madison, Iowa, where he lived until twenty-one-years old, when he came to Kansas. He was married in 1852 to Miss Clarissa A. Smiley, of Urbania, Ohio. They have four children-Grace A., Arthur E., Stephen and Mark. Mrs. Marsh is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Dodge City. Mr. Marsh is a member of Blue Lodge,...

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Gaede, Baker & Co.

Gaede, Baker & Co., dealers in a general line of fancy dry goods, clothing and gents furnishing goods and livestock. They opened trade January 1, 1882, and carry a stock of $6,000 and employ one clerk in the business. The individual names of the firm are Richard Gaede, H. C. Baker and S. H. Fields. H. C. Baker first came to Dodge City January 1, 1882. He was born at Logansport, Cass Co., Ind., September 16, 1849. The family moved to Nemaha County, Neb., in 1856, where he was raised in a small village. He first began business in life as a clerk in a store at Brownville, Neb., and has always followed mercantile pursuits. He went to Atchison County, Mo., in 1874, and clerked in a dry goods store for some time, when he purchased a third interest in the same and continued for three years. He then became a member of the firm of Gaede, Baker & Co., until he came to Dodge City. He was married in May 1877, to Miss Bertha Renner, of Rockport, Mo. They have two children – Nellie and...

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Wright, Beverly & Co.

Wright, Beverly & Co., dealers in a general stock of merchandise and men’s outfitting goods, opened business in 1877. They employ eight clerks and carry a general stock of $40,000. Individual names of the firm are R. M. Wright and H. M. Beverly. H. M. Beverly came to Kansas in 1870 and engaged in the cattle business at Abilene, afterward at Ellsworth, Great Bend, and finally Dodge City. He has followed the Texas cattle trade for a number of years. He was born in King George County, Va., in 1826, and was raised in Henderson, Ky. He enlisted with Texas troops in Confederate State service, was Second Lieutenant of his company, and served some time in that capacity. He was married in 1850 to Miss Fannie C. Skiles, a native of Kentucky. They have seven children living: E. Bell, William, Harry M., Ellen H., (married to Lieutenant F. D. Sharp, USA), James R. Eva L., and C. May; lost one, Fannie B., who was married to John Frazer, of Kansas City, who is also...

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The Sagamore Hotel

An engraving of the Sagamore is shown in this issue of the Democrat. This, one of the best hotels in Eastern Oregon, was erected by J. B. Griswold last season, and opened under the present management October 1st. The building is well arranged and very commodious, consisting of forty-four rooms, with elegant verandas surrounding it, giving it the homelike appearance an inspection of its interior discloses. The main office is well arranged, supplied as it is with a number of conveniences for guests, including all the leading periodicals and magazines. The baggage room opens off the private office in such a manner that the loss of a piece of baggage cannot possibly occur. The writing room, which opens to the right of the main hall, is very nice a person being enabled to enjoy quietude while attending to their correspondence. The dining room is on the ground floor, and is furnished in a tasty and elegant manner, and he table is supplied with all the markets afford. The universal opinion of the traveling public is that the best meals in Eastern Oregon are served here. The kitchen is neat, clean and well ventilated, to a much greater degree than usually found in a hotel. In the basement are located the commercial sample rooms, vegetable and fruit rooms, and what is beyond doubt one of the finest cold storage plants...

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Crystal Palace

Among our large and flourishing business houses, that of the Crystal Palace must be accorded a prominent place. This business was started in l887 in a small way, by Mr. Adler, in the Wisdom block, and enjoyed exceptional prosperity from the start. Last November he was compelled to move to his new quarters and now occupies a floor space of 50×100. In this he carries a very heavy line of jewelry, musical instruments, books, stationery, toys. etc. His jewelry department of which we present an interior cut, is by far the handsomest in the city, provided as it is with the elegant set of fixtures. The stock is an unusually valuable one, including watches, clocks, diamonds, precious stones in endless variety, optical goods, silver and gold jewelry of every description. The manufacturing and repairing department is a special feature, having an expert workman in charge of it. In his musical goods department he has the agency of such established makes as Decker & Sons and Chickering pianos, and Smith & Barnes organs, besides the leading manufacturers of stringed instruments. Bicycles and supplies are also carried, his specialty being the Columbia.” the king of all wheels.” He has given this department its own personal attention and as it consequence has sold more wheels than all other agencies combined. Mr. Adler also carries as large and fine a line of vocal...

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Peoples Steam Laundry

One of the most important industries of our thriving town is the above, it portion of the interior of which we present, in an accompanying cut. It is located on Washington street, a half block east of the Warshauer Hotel, in the most central part of the city, and at a spot where they have the moat excellent drainage. The building is 30×100 feet, two stories high. In the purchase of machinery, and in the installation of business no expense was spared in making everything first class, in order that the work turned out might equal any in the state. A short time since we paid a visit to the laundry, and were well repaid. Although from early Monday morning until late Saturday night it is a busy place, time is always taken to show visitors through, and explain the machinery and its workings. Entering the office which is neat and comfortable in its appearance, one can follow the process of washing, drying, starching and ironing, until the once soiled linen is tied up ready for delivery. In its snowy whiteness, which must be seen to be appreciated. The bundles of dirty clothes are assorted into separate bins, after being counted and marked, and are then ready for the wash-room. Large crates are wheeled to the clothes bins, and the clothes run into the washroom, and put into the...

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