Topic: Black Hawk War

Autobiography of Black Hawk or Ma-Ka-Tai-Me-She-Kia-Kiak

Embracing The Traditions Of His Nation, Various Wars In Which He Has Been Engaged, And His Account Of The Cause And General History Of The Black Hawk War Of 1832, His Surrender, and Travels Through the United States. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now The changes of fortune and vicissitudes of war made you my conqueror. When my last resources were exhausted, my warriors worn down with long and toilsome marches, we yielded, and I became your prisoner. The story of my life is told in the following pages: it is intimately connected, and in some measure, identified, with a part of the history of your own: I have, therefore, dedicated it to you. The changes of many summers have brought old age upon me, and I can not expect to survive many moons. Before I set out on my journey to the land of my fathers, I have determined to give my motives and reasons for my former hostilities to the whites, and to vindicate...

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Black Hawk Indian Wars

Early in April, 1832, Brig. General Atkinson, with about three hundred troops, was ordered to Fort Armstrong to prevent a threatened war between the Menominee and Fox Indians, on account of a massacre, committed by a band of the latter on a small band of drunken Menominee the previous summer at a point near Fort Crawford. To prevent bloodshed he was directed to demand the murderers of the Foxes; but on arriving at Rock Island he soon learned that there was imminent danger of a war of a different character–that Black Hawk, with his entire band, was then on...

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Biography of Ira F. M. Butler

IRA F.M. BUTLER. – The honesty and wholeheartedness of a certain, and indeed, predominating, class of our early settlers is nowhere better exemplified than in Mr. Butler. Seventy-seven years of age, but still vigorous and kindly, adhering firmly to the temperance principles which have prevented the dissipation of his native course, and while well-to-do, indeed wealthy, spending much of his means in benevolent works, he is a striking example of the noble old gentleman. He was born in Barren county, Kentucky, in 1812, and was the son of Major Peter Butler, distinguished in the war of 1812. In 1829 the family moved to Illinois. Young Butler grew up on a farm in the region since designated as Warren county, remaining with his father until the outbreak of the Black Hawk war. He heard the call raised at that time to save the early settlements, and enlisting served until the Indians were quieted. The experience thus obtained served to open for him the position of deputy sheriff. In 1835 he was married to Miss Mary A. Davidson, who for more than fifty years was his devoted wife, and bore him eight children. Soon afterwards he was elected sheriff, and four years later was appointed by Stephen A. Douglas as clerk of the circuit court, filling that office seven years. In 1853 he sold his farm and closed out all his...

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Biography of Hon. John Bird

HON. JOHN BIRD. – This venerable pioneer of our state comes from that stock of state-makers and town-builders who have ever been at the front. He was born in 1810 in Boone county, Kentucky, and lived there with his father until the year 1827, thereafter making Illinois his home until 1847. In the latter year he joined the train of Captain Sawyer, and set forth for Oregon, starting from Missouri about the 1st of May. Upon the trip nothing was more notable than the appearance of about one hundred Pawnee Indians, who laid a blanket on the ground for the emigrants as they passed to drop in a contribution of flour, and the shooting with arrows of two valuable horses by the same Indians. The toils, adventures and exertions, of vast interest and importance, were of the same character as of the early thousands who made the long journey. Crossing the Cascade Mountains by the Barlow Road the 1st of October, Mr. Bird passed his first winter in our state at Linn City, opposite Oregon City, and indeed made this point his home until 1849. In that memorable year of gold he went to the California mines, but did not “strike it rich,” and after deliberation decided that the better place to make a fortune was in the rich valleys of Oregon. Returning therefore to our state he selected...

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