Topic: Assiniboine

Plains Indians Use of Rawhide

The Use of Rawhide. In the use of rawhide for binding and hafting (handle or strap), the Plains tribes seem almost unique. When making mauls and stone-headed clubs a piece of green or wet hide is firmly sewed on and as this dries its natural shrinkage sets the parts firmly. This is nicely illustrated in saddles. Thus, rawhide here takes the place of nails, twine, cement, etc., in other cultures. The Partleche A number of characteristic bags were made of rawhide, the most conspicuous being the parfleche. Its simplicity of construction is inspiring and its usefulness scarcely to be...

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Religion and Ceremonies of the Plains Tribes

The sacred beliefs of these Indians are largely formulated and expressed in sayings and narratives having some resemblance to the legends of European peoples. There are available large collections of these tales and myths from the Blackfoot, Crow, Nez Perce, Assiniboin, Gros Ventre, Arapaho, Arikara, Pawnee, Omaha, Northern Shoshoni, and less complete series from the Dakota, Cheyenne, and Ute. In these will be found much curious and interesting information. Each tribe in this area has its own individual beliefs and sacred myths, yet many have much in common, the distribution of the various incidents therein forming one of the...

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Government and Societies of the Plains Tribes

The political organization of plains tribes was rather loose and in general quite democratic. Each band, gens, or clan informally recognized an indefinite number of men as head men, one or more of whom were formally vested with representative powers in the tribal council. Among the Dakota, there was a kind of society of older men, self-electing, who legislated on all important matters. They appointed four of their number to exercise the executive functions. The Omaha had a somewhat similar system. The Cheyenne had four chiefs of equal rank and a popularly elected council of forty members. Among the...

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Assiniboin Indian Clans, Bands and Gens

Many tribes have sub-tribes, bands, gens, clans and phratry.  Often very little information is known or they no longer exist.  We have included them here to provide more information about the tribes. Chabin (from ge ‘mountain’). A division of the Assiniboin. Maximilian, Trav., 194, 1843. Eagle Hills Assiniboin. A band of Assiniboin of 35 lodges living in 1808 between Bear hills and South Saskatchewan r., Assiniboia Canada. Henry Thompson Jour., Coues ed., ii, 523. 1897 Gens de Pied (French: foot people). A former band of Assiniboin in 33 lodges w. of Eagle hills, Assiniboia, Canada. Henry (1808) in Coues, New Light, ii, 491, 1897. Itscheabine. A division of the Assiniboin, numbering 850, including 250 warriors, in 100 tipis, when seen by Lewis and Clark in 1804, at which time they roved on the headwaters of Mouse (Souris), Qu’Appelle, and Assiniboine rs., in the United States and Canada. In 1808, according to Henry (Coues, New Light, n, 522, 1897), they were at enmity with the Dakota, Shoshoni, and with some of the Arikara and other tribes, but were friendly with the Cree. They lived by hunting, conducting trade with the Hudson’s Bay, Northwest, and N. Y. fur companies, whose posts were 150 m. N. of Ft Mandan. They are said to have paid little attention to their engagements and were great drunkards. In 1853 they numbered 10 lodges under chief...

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