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Surname: Wright

Rev. Frank Wright, a Choctaw Indian

Third session, Thursday morning, October 17 Rev. Frank Wright, a Choctaw Indian, was introduced as the next speaker. Rev. Frank Wright. With the Choctaws the land question is, When shall we get hold of our land? All we want is the land. We were the first of the five tribes to agree to take it in severalty, and we are the last to get our allotments. I do not know why. So far as making farmers of the Indians, in dealing with a man you have got to take him as you find him. You cannot make blacksmiths of all the Indians, and you can not make farmers of them all. Some will turn to the ministry, some to medicine, and some to law. You can make no hard and fast rule about it. But the first principle to teach him is that he must labor to take care of himself. The Indian must become self-dependent. We have been giving them rations till they are pauperized. It is a scandal and a shame, and I shall be glad when rations are absolutely cut off and the Indians must work or starve. I have worked among the Apaches, who were held as prisoners, and have established missions among them, and I want to tell you what I have found there. These prisoners were compelled to work, and it had a...

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Biography of James H. Wright

James H. Wright, one of the oldest grain buyers in the County, residing at Arthur, was born near the town of Poland, Trumbull (now Mahoning) County, Ohio, February 6,1827 ,and is a son of James and Mary (Kidd) Wright, who were born near Poland, Trumbull (now Mahoning) County, Ohio, of Scotch-Irish origin. Rev. James Wright (father) received his education for the Presbyterian ministry at the Canonsburg College, and spent most of his life in preaching the gospel, first at Poland, and later at Westfield, Pennsylvania. He died in 1843 at the age of fifty-nine years. His father was Alexander Wright, who was an early settler from the north of Ireland, to Washing-ton County. He married a Scotch girl by the name of Esther Silcox. Robert Kidd (grand-father) was also a native of Ireland, was an early settler in Trumbull County, Ohio, and in religious affairs he was known as a Seceder in that day, now known as a United Presbyterian. James H. Wright was reared in his native County, acid in Pennsylvania, receiving the advantages of an ordinary education. In 1857 he came west and located at Arcola, which at that time contained but three houses, and was for several years engaged in farming in that vicinity. In 1873 he commenced buying grain at Hindsboro, where he continued successfully in business until 1886, when he removed to Arthur, where...

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Reuben Wright Genealogy

Oliver Wright 1. Reuben2 Wright, son of Oliver1, was b. in Keene, Apr. 29, 1772, of Oliver and Sarah Wright; d. Houghton, Mich., Aug. 18, 1852; m. Dec. 30 (or 31), Olive Atwood, b. Templeton, Mass., July 5, 1775, d. Washington, N. H., Aug. 15, 1842; dau. of John and Elizabeth (Lawrence) Atwood of Packersfield. Ch.: Roxana3, b. Marlboro, Sept. 8, 1800, m. Dec. 18, 1827, Amos Corey, Jr., of Washington, N. H., b. there, Sept. 19, 1802; d. Antrim, Apr. 6, 1872, son of Amos and Achsah (Townsend) Corey. She d. at Antrim, Sept. 7, 1872. They had moved from Washington to Antrim in 1857. Ch.: Achsah Louisa4, b. Washington, N. H., 1828; m. Mar. 1857, Peter Shuttleworth of Southborough, Mass. Ch.: Ella J.5 Shuttleworth, b. May 23, 1858. Alva Kay5 Shuttleworth, b. June 14, 1859. Ida May5 Shuttleworth, b. Feb. 2, 1862. Caroline Louisa5 Shuttleworth, b. Feb. 14, 1865. Clara Mabel5 Shuttleworth, b. Oct. 11, 1866. Olive Wright4 Corey, b. Washington, N. H., 1830; d. unm. in 1872. Melinda A.4 Corey, b. Washington, 1832; d. unm. in 1861. George F.4 Corey, b. Washington, Apr. 23, 1836; m. Nov. 29, 1860, Clara R. Hill, b. Antrim, 1841; dau. of Henry and Rebecca (Kelso) Hill of Antrim. They lived for a time at Waltham, where he was employed in the watch factory, but returned to the old homestead in...

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Phineas Wright Genealogy

Phinehas Wright of Hartford, Conn., m. Zilpha Cooper of Westmoreland, N. H., settled at Walpole and removed to Keene abt. 1796. Caleb2 Wright, son of Phinehas, b. Feb. 15, 1794, d. Keene, Nov. 21, 1869; m. Dec. 7, 1815, Sarah Reed, b. Surry, July 14, 1796, d. Keene, Nov. 16, 1838. Among their fifteen children, was: Calvin3, b. Keene, Mar. 13, 1816; d. Gilsum, Feb. 16, 1907; m. Diantha Leborveau of Keene, and had six children. Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Wright lived in S., on the Old Kemp or John Dunn place for a few years, and had born here:  Harriet Emily4, b. Oct. 14, 1847; d. Feb. 14, 1848. A son, George Abbott4, b. Swanzey, Aug. 18, 1844; d. S. Mar. 3, 1848. These two children were buried in the village cemetery in Surry. We have more in regard to the Caleb Wright family, but do not print it as an extended account of the Wright family is being prepared for the Surry Town...

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John Wright Genealogy

I have not yet ascertained the relationship of John and “Billy” Wright. “Billy” may have been the father or a brother of John. John moved from Nelson to Sullivan, and Billy bought land there. His land in Sullivan, was on the Alonzo Mason lot, and he may have lived in the house on that lot for a while. Perry Wright, a son of Tabitha (looks as if spelled Talatha on Nelson records), an adopted son of Billy Wright and Sally his wife, d. at Packersfield (now Nelson), Feb. 24, 1814. William Wright of Packersfield, m. Oct. 1, 1793, Sally Willard of Lancaster, Mass. On records of Dublin is found, William Wright, m. May 3, 1804 Sally Dunckley. “Billy” Wright, a joiner, is in Dublin in 1805. There was a “Billy” Wright, who d. in Surry, Feb. 21, 1874, unm., and known to have been a son of Oliver. The relationship of these several Billy Wrights requires further investigation. John Wright, m. Jan. 1, 1795, Phebe Stoddard, dau. of Richard and Rachel (Hill) Stoddard. She m. after his death, in Sullivan, in 1815. Ch.: Polly2, b. Packersfield, Apr. 7, 1795. Rachel2, b. Packersfield, Mar. 9, 1797. Phebe2, b. Packersfield, Dec. 7, 1798. Chloe2, b. Packersfield, May 14, 1801. Clarissa2, b. Packersfield, May 25, 1803. Milan2, b. S., Dec. 25, 1807; d. in S., Aug. 17, 1831, unm. Minot2, b. Oct....

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John Wright Genealogy

John Wright m. Mary and res. Dunstable. Benjamin2 Wright, son of John1, b. at Dunstable, d. Milford, N. H., res. at Mile Slip (afterwards Milford); m. Betsey Adams of Dunstable (now Nashua). Of their eleven children eight were b. in Mile Slip, and the last three in Milford: Benjamin, b. May 20, 1775; d. Sept. 19, 1777. Benjamin; Betsey; Ira; Joel, 1, b. Jan. 26, 1784; Oliver; Sally; Mary; Lydia; Nehemiah and Gratia. Joel3 Wright, son of Benjamin2, was the fifth minister and third settled pastor of the First Cong. Church of S. See page 409. According to the Milford, N. H. records, he was b. Jan. 26, other authorities give it Jan. 27, 1784. Res. in the old Muzzey house while in S.; he was an invalid the last ten years of his life and died at South Hadley, Mass., June 8, 1859; m. Lucy W. Grosvenor, b. Paxton, Mass., Dec. 8, 1785; d. Fond DuLac, Wis., Oct. 18, 1861; dau. of Rev. Daniel and Deborah (Hall) Grosvenor of Petersham, Mass. Ch.: Daniel Grosvenor4, b. Leverett, Mass., Sept. 22, 1813, d. in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Dec. 29, 1897; m. May 25, 1836, Aletta Van Brunt; dau. of Jeremiah of New Utrecht, L. I. In Sullivan he lived where Mrs. Amos Wardwell recently lived. He was then a farmer. He afterwards studied for the ministry, took orders in the...

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Biographical Sketch of John Wright

John Wright, of England, came to America and settled in Pittsylvania County, Va. He had four children John, William, Nancy, and another daughter. William married Isabella Thrailkill, of Virginia, and settled in Clark County, Ky. He served five years in the revolutionary war. He had twelve children, ten of whom lived to be grown, and were married. His first son, William, married Nancy Oliver, of Kentucky, and they had eleven children Harvey S., James T., William, Stephen, Isaac W., Elizabeth, Susan, Nancy, Emeline, Louisa, and Lucinda. Mr. Wright settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1824, on a place adjoining the present town of Danville, where he lived and kept tavern for many years. A Methodist minister named Prescott, stopped at his house one day to get his dinner, and there being no men present he went to the barn to feed his horse. While looking around for the food he saw some large flat gourds, which he supposed to be pumpkins, and fed a lot of them to his horse. After that he was called Gourd Head Prescott. In 1833 Mr. Wright sold his place to Rev. Andrew Monroe, a well known pioneer Methodist preacher, who lived there and kept tavern for some time. Isabella Wright, sister of William Wright, Sr., married John Stone, who settled in Montgomery County in 1818, but afterward removed to...

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Biographical Sketch of Jesse Wright

Jesse Wright and his wife, Dicey Galarby, of Amherst Co., Va., had George G., Ellis, Shelton, William, Daniel, and Nancy. George G. married Sally Jacobs, of Nelson Co., Va., and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1837. Their children were-Margaret, Anna V., Catharine and George G., Jr. Margaret married John R. Arnor. Anna V. married Isaac H. Talbott, of Montgomery County. Catharine married Hon. Norman J. Colman, editor of Caiman’s Rural World and Lieut.-Gov. of Missouri. George G., Jr., lives in Montgomery County, is an influential citizen and a leader of the Democratic party of his...

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Abstracts of Wills on File in the City of New York Surrogate’s Office 1660-1680

Abstracts of wills on file in the surrogate’s office city of New York 1660-1680. From May 1787 to the present, county surrogate’s courts have recorded probates. However, the court of probates and court of chancery handled estates of deceased persons who died in one county but who owned property in another. An 1823 law mandated that all probates come under the jurisdiction of the county surrogate’s courts. Each surrogate’s court has a comprehensive index to all probate records, including the unrecorded probate packets. Interestingly enough, there are wills existing and on record at the Surrogate’s Office in New York City for the time-span of 1660-1680. Genealogical extracts of these wills have been provided below.

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Biographical Sketch of Jesse E. Wright

Son of John R. and Charlotte C. (Whitmire) Wright was born Jan. 22, 1871 in Going Snake District; Married in June 1892 in Adair county Mary E., daughter of Walter and Sally West. They are the parents of Willie Cornelia, born April 3, 1898, and Sally born July 30, 1903. Mr. Wright was educated in the Cherokee schools, and spent two years at the Male Seminary. He is a farmer, successful and takes part in all movements for public...

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Biographical Sketch of E. B. Wright

(See Grant and Downing) Ellis Buffington Wright, born in Going Snake District, October 29, 1854. Married May 29, 1881, Elizabeth, daughter of Eli West and Jennie Chinosa (Vann) Dougherty, born July 6, 1862 and graduated from Female Seminary June 27, 1879. They were the parents of: William Ellis, Francis Otto, Mayes, Bryan, Lydia, John Lindsay and Ruth Wright. Ellis Buffington Wright is a quiet, reserved man of more than ordinary ability and he has always been noted for his unswerving integrity and reliability. He was elected Townsite Commissioner in 1892, member of Council from Cooweescoowee District August 2, 1897 and Senator from the same District on August 7, 1899. Was appointed to fill the unexpired term of Sheriff of Cooweescoowee District at the death of James Musgrove by Chief C. J....

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Biographical Sketch of Robert M. Wright

Robert M. Wright, a prominent resident of Dodge City, has prospered as a farmer, stockman, merchant and public servant. He is a native of the South, born in Bladensburg, Prince George County, Maryland, September 2, 1840. His father, who was born at Alexandria, Virginia, in 1800, often recounted his experlence as a boy on the battlefield of Bladensburg administering to wounded American soldiers. Mr. Wright’s great grandfather was a Prdsbyterian minister in Revolutionary times and raised a regiment of plowboys at Elizabethtown, New Jersey, of which he had command at the battle of the Meadows. The British had a price on his head and destroyed his property and the Tories finally killed him. His wife was shot by Hessian soldiers as she sat at a window with her baby. Elias B. Caldwell, the maternal grandfather, was clerk of the United States Supreme Court at Washington for many years, and when the capitol was destroyed by the British in the War of 1812 his library, which he had loaned to Congress, was also burned. Mr. Wright came West when sixteen years of age, and until 1859 lived on a farm near St. Louis. In 1850 he took an overland trip to Denver, and during the following eight years, as a trader and a contractor for hauling grain and cutting hay and wood, he crossed the plains four times by wagon...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Wright

Interviewer: Mamie Hanberry Person Interviewed: Mary Wright Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Gracey, Kentucky Date of Birth: August 1, 1865 Place of Residence: 204 W. Fourth St. “I was born at Gracey, Kentucky on Mr. James Colemans far, in a log cabin wid a dirt floor en a stick chimney. “Folks uster weat wat dey calls a “Polanaise”. Hid wat kinder like a wrapper made of calico made wid tight in de waist en wide in de bottom. Den I’ve remembers de basque waist on de over skirts dese war made real tight waists wid a point in de back en ober de stomach. De skirt wer real full dem a skirt ober dis ter de knees wid a big pucker on de hips.” “My Mammy bound me out to Miss Puss Graham ter learn ter work, foh my vittals en cloes. Miss Puss gave me a pair of red morocco shoes en I was made so happy, I’se neber fohgot dese shoes. “I heard my Mammy talk of “De Nigger Risin”. De Klu Klux uster stick de niggers head on er stake alongside de Cadiz road en dar de buzzards would eat them till nuthin’ was left but de bones. Dar war a sign on dis stake dat said “Look out Nigger You are next”. Us chilluns would not go far way from dat cabin. I’se tells you...

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Will of Peter Wright – 1675

“Whereas I am informed that PETER WRIGHT, late of Oyster Bay, upon Long Island, was casually drowned in Virginia and dyed intestate,” upon the request of his daughter Hannah, and son Gideon Wright, the said Gideon Wright is appointed administrator. April 12, 1675. E. Andross. LIBER 1-2, page...

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Slave Narrative of Daphney Wright

Interviewer: Phoebe Faucette Person Interviewed: Daphney Wright Location: Scotia, South Carolina Age: 106 106 Year Old Ex-Slave Just around the bend from the old mill pond on the way to Davis Swimming Pool lives a very old negro woman. Her name is Daphney Wright, though that name has never been heard by those who affectionately know her as “Aunt Affie”. She says she is 106 years old. She comes to the door without a cane and greets her guests with accustomed curtsey. She is neatly dressed and still wears a fresh white cap as she did when she worked for the white folks. Save for her wearing glasses and walking slowly, there are no evidences of illness or infirmities. She has a sturdy frame, and a kindly face shows through the wrinkles. “I been livin’ in Beaufort when de war fust (first) break out”, she begins. “Mr. Robert Cally was my marsa. Dat wuz in October. De Southern soldiers come through Bluffton on a Wednesday and tell de white folks must get out de way, de Yankees right behind ’em! De summer place been at Bluffton. De plantation wuz ten miles away. After we refugee from Bluffton, we spent de fust night at Jonesville. From dere we went to Hardeeville. We got here on Saturday evening. You know we had to ride by horses—in wagons an’ buggies. Dere weren’t...

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