Surname: Word

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Early Residents of Helena, Montana

Isaac D. McCutcheon, born in New York in 1840, removed to Mich, with his parents in 1846, and was there educated. He began teaching school at the age of 18 years, and continued to teach for 5 years, after which he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1868. He practised his profession in Charlotte, Michigan, until 1882, when he was appointed secretary of Montana. He resigned in 1883 to return to the practice of the law. F. S. Witherbee, born in Flint, Michigan, in 1860, removed to Louisville, in 1873. He was educated for a physician, graduating in Philadelphia 1883, but not liking his profession, he became a publisher in Washington D.C. He sold out his business in 1888, and came to Helena, where he engaged in real estate, organizing the Witherbee and Hunter Estate, Loan, Investment Co., Limited. O. K. Allen, born in the state of New York, in 1852, received a collegiate education, and in 1876 went to Colorado, where he remained until 1883, when he came to Montana and engaged in mining. In 1880 he acquired the Gould mine, and organized a stock company to develop the property. The mine has produced over $1,000,000, and is still producing richly. F. P. Sterling was born in Elkhorn, Wisconsin, in 1843, and was educated in his native town. In 1861 he entered the union army,...

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1863 Settlers to Madison County, Montana

John Willhard, born in Germany Sept. 28, 1838, came to the U. S. in 1854, and crossed the plains with a mule-team in 1860, to Colorado, where he mined and farmed until May 1863, when he followed the immigration to Montana. After mining one season at Virginia City he took a farm of 640 acres in the Beaverhead Valley, a mile below Twin Bridges. In company with Lester Harding he discovered Carpenter’s Bar. Carl Rahmig, born in Germany Oct. 3, 1837, came to the U. S. in 1858, locating in Iowa, where he remained until 1862, when he went to Nevada with a horse-team. After a short stay there and in Cal. he went to Idaho, and thence to Montana. His first residence was in the Prickly Pear Valley, after prospecting and mining until 1870 he settled on a farm in the valley of Willow Creek, between the Madison and Beaverhead Rivers, and raised stock. O. W. Jay, born in New York May 2, 1844, removed with his parents to Wisconsin and Illinois, being raised a farmer. At the age of 17 years went to Colorado, returning the same season to Illinois. In. 1863 went again to Colorado, and the same year to Virginia City, where he mined until 1870, when he secured a farm of 1,100 acres. He married Ella J. Wilcox in 1874. Wilson Butt, Fish Creek,...

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Slave Narrative of Sophia Word

Interviewer: Pearl House Person Interviewed: Sophia Word Location: Kentucky Date of Birth: February 2, 1837 Age: 99 The following story of slave days is the exact words of one who had the bitter experience of slavery. Sophia Word, who is now ninety-nine years of age, born February 2, 1837. She tells me she was in bondage for nineteen years and nine months. I shall repeat just as she told the story: “I wuz here in time of Mexican War and seed ’em get up volunteers to go. They wuz dressed in brown and band played ‘Our Hunting Shirts are Fringed with Doe and away We march to Mexico’. “My grandmother came straight from Africa and wuz auctioned off and bought by William Reide Father. When he died William Reides inherited my mother. Mother married a Bates and had ten of us children. “Our Master didn’t auction off his slaves as the other masters would for he was a better master than most of them. When he started to sale one of us he would go out and talk to the old slave trader like he wuz g’wine to sale a cow or sometin and then he would come back to git the slave he wanted. This wuz the way my mothers’ brother and sister wuz sold. When the other masters at other places sold a slave they put the...

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