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Surname: Woods

Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District

Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District Adams, Absalom Adams, James M. Allums, Britton Amoss, James Barnes, William Bays, John R. Bays, Moses Bays, Nathaniel Boman, Isham Boman, Larkin Boman, Levi Boman, Robert Boman, William Brooks, Isaac R. Brooks, John Brooks, William Burson, Isaac C. Butler, Whitaker Cardwell, William Collum, James Crawley, Bird Crawley, Turner Culberson, David H. Culberson, James H. Culberson, Jeremiah C. Curry, James Daniel, James L. Daniel, William B. Day, Stephen Dennis, Peter Dickson, Thomas Dunn, Barney Ethredge, Bryant Ethridge, Zachariah Funderburk, Washington Furgison, Burrell Gibson, Churchill Gibson, William Glenn, James Gresham, Davis E. Grizzle, Kinchen Guyse, Joel Harbuck, Henry, Sr. Harbuck, Henry, Jr. Harbuck, William Hendon, Henry T. Hicks, Jacob Hicks, Littleberry Hicks, Nathaniel Holmes, Benjamin Holt, William Hopson, William Horton, Jeremiah Jackson, Thomas Jenkins, John Jenkins, Robert Jennings, Robert M. Johnson, Lewis Johnson, Mordecai Jones, Willie Keeth, James M. Kilgore, Robert Kilgore, William Kirkland, John Kolb, Jonathan Latimer, Samuel M. Layton, Thomas S. Lewis, Henry. Lipham, John McCullars, Andrew McPost, Lindsey Mays, James Mays, Robert Meadows, Simeon Meadows, Vincent Miller, John C. Mobley, William Moran, Jesse Moran, William J. Morgan, Wilson Norman, Jeremiah Pace, Noel Patterson, James Patterson, John, Jr. Patterson, Thomas Patterson, William Peppin, Noah Phipps, Thomas Poe, Gilbert Poe, Jonathan Poe, Solomon Post, John B. Post, Samuel B. Powers, James G. Redding, John Reeves, James Rigsby, Allen Rigsby, Eli Rigsby,...

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Bolton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Bolton Massachusetts.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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Seneca County New York Biographies

In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and linked each edition to the PDF file. Once you’ve found the biography you...

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The Cherokee Revolt – Indian Wars

From the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia and Tennessee to Arkansas and their establishment upon the reservation allotted to them by treaty with the Government in Arkansas, they have, until the period of this outbreak to the narrative of which this chapter is devoted, been considered as among the least dangerous and most peaceable of the tribes in that region. But through various causes, chief among which has been notably the introduction among them of a horde of those pests of the West the border ruffians; these half wild, half-breed Nomads were encouraged by these Indians, as it appeared, for the sake of the liquor traffic. According to the official accounts of this attempt to reopen hostilities, it appears that on the 11th of April, 1872, it originated with a man named J. J. Kesterson, living in the Cherokee nation, near the Arkansas line, about fifty miles from Little Rock. On that day he went to Little Rock, and filed information against one Proctor, also a white man, married to a Cherokee woman, for assaulting with intent to kill him while in his saw mill, on the 13th of February. Proctor fired a revolver at Kesterson, the ball striking him just above the left eye, but before he could fire again Kesterson escaped. Proctor, at the time, was under indictment in the Snake District for the murder of his...

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Samuel Woods Genealogy

I. Samuel1 Woods of Cambridge, Mass., b. abt. 1636; went to Groton, Mass., in 1662; d. in Groton, Mar. 19, 1712; m. in Cambridge, Mass., Sept. 28, 1659, Alice Rushton, b. abt. 1636. Seven ch.: the first b. in Cambridge, the others in Groton, Mass. II. Samuel2 Woods, son of Samuel1, I, b. Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 3, 1661; m. in Chelmsford, Mass., Dec. 30, 1685, Hannah Farwell, b. Chelmsford, Mass., Jan. 20, 1667-8; dau. of Joseph and Hannah (Learned) Farwell. She m. (2), Capt. Peter Joslin of Lancaster, Mass. Peter’s first wife was slain by the Indians who attacked her home, July 18, 1692, in Lancaster. Samuel and Hannah Woods had eight ch., the oldest. III. Samuel3 Woods, b. (place and date unknown); d. Groton, Mass., Apr. 10, 1773; m. Nov. 29, 1720, Patience Bigelow, b. Sept. 30, 1698, probably dau. of James and Elizabeth (Child) Bigelow of Watertown, Mass. She d. in Groton, Mass., Jan. 23, 1771. Eight ch. b. Groton. IV. William4 Woods, son of Samuel3, III, b. Groton, Oct. 17, 1735; d. Keene, Mar. 23, 1818; m. Feb. 9, 1757, Naomi Longley, b. Chelmsford, Mass., May 18, 1741; d. Keene, Sept. 8, 1815; dau. of Nathaniel and Lydia (Foster) Longley. Their ch. were: Naomi5, b. Chelmsford, Mass., May 18, 1759, bur. Oct. 16, 1759. William5, b. Chelmsford, May, 1761, slain in the battle of Bennington, Aug....

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. R. C. Woods

Lelia LeVander Mizel born at Chelsea, April 14, 1890, educated at Chelsea and Female Seminary. Married October 19, 1910, Raymond Charles Woods, born December 15, 1885, in Labette County Kansas. They are the parents of: Charles Edwin, born April 26, 1912; Lois Evelyn, born August 29, 1914 and Raymond Woods, born February 13, 1921. Mr. Woods is the son of Oscar E. and Clara Woods, and Mrs. Lelia LeVander Woods is the daughter of John LeVander and Susan Lillie (McIntosh) Mizer; the latter, the daughter of John Ross McIntosh, the last Chief Justice of the Cherokee...

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Slave Narrative of Wes Woods

Interviewer: Eliza Ison Person Interviewed: Wes Woods Location: Duncantown, Kentucky Place of Birth: Garrard County, KY Date of Birth: May 21, 1864 Interview with Ex-Slave Uncle Wes Woods: My first visit to Uncle Wes Wood, and his wife Aunt Lizzie Wood, found them in their own comfortable little home in Duncantown, a nice urban section of the town, where most of the inhabitants are of the better class of colored people. A small yard with a picket fence and gate surround the yard, which had tall hollyhocks, rearing their heads high above the fence. A knock on the front door brought the cordial invitation “to come in”. Upon entering, I was invited to have a chair and “rest my hat”. After seating myself and making inquiry as to their health, I told them the object of my visit, and their faces beamed when I asked if they remembered “slave days”. Aunt Lizzie set down the can of beans she was preparing for their meal and said with a clasp of her hands, “Lawsey, Honey, what I do know would fill a book”. Uncle Wes had been a “shut-in” for eleven months, and was in bed, but was cheerful and bright with an intelligent memory, rarely found in one his age. Uncle Wes tells me that he was born May 21, 1864 in Garrard County, near Cartersville, and was first...

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Slave Narrative of Prince Johnson

Interviewer: Mrs. Carrie Campbell Person Interviewed: Prince Johnson Location: Clarksdale, Mississippi “Yes mam, I sho’ can tell you all ’bout it ’cause I was dere when it all happened. My gran’pa, Peter, gran’ma, Millie, my pa, John, an’ my ma, Frances, all come from Alabama to Yazoo County to live in de Love fam’ly. Dey names was Dennis when day come, but, after de custom o’ dem days, dey took de name of Love from dey new owner. Me an’ all o’ my brothers an’ sisters was born right dere. Dey was eleven head o’ us. I was de oldes’. Den come Harry, John, William, Henry, Phillis, Polly, Nellie, Virginny, Millie, an’ de baby, Ella. “Us all lived in de quarters an’ de beds was home made. Dey had wooden legs wid canvas stretched ‘crost ’em. I can’t ‘member so much ’bout de quarters ’cause ’bout dat time de young miss married Colonel Johnson an’ moved to dis place in Carroll County. She carried wid her over one hund’ed head o’ darkies. “Den us names was changed from Love to Johnson. My new marster was sure a fine gent’man. He lived in a big two-story white house dat had big white posts in front. De flowers all’ roun’ it jus’ set it off. “Marster took me for de house boy. Den I sho’ carried my head high. He’d say...

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Slave Narrative of George Woods (Wood)

Interviewer: F. S. DuPre Person Interviewed: George Woods Location: Spartanburg, South Carolina Age: 78 While looking for an ex-slave in a certain part of Spartanburg this morning, I was directed across the street to “an old man who lives there”. I knocked at the door but received no answer. Then I noticed an old man walking around by the side of the house. He was tall and straight, standing about 6 feet 2 inches. He said that his name was George Wood and that he was 78 years of age. He stated that he was born during slavery, and lived on Peter Sepah’s place in York County. Peter Sepah’s farm, where he was born, was near the North Carolina line; it consisted of approximately 200 acres. His parents were named Dan and Sarah Wood. His mother was given to old man Sepah by his father as a wedding present, and his grandfather had been given to an older Sepah by his parent as a wedding present. He said it was the custom in slavery times that a slave be given to the son or daughter by the white people when they got married. He was too young to work, but about the time the war was over, he was allowed to drive the horses that pulled the thrasher of wheat. His master used to walk around and around while...

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Slave Narrative of Tom W. Woods

Person Interviewed: Tom W. Woods Location: Alderson, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Florence, Alabama Age: 83 Lady, if de nigger hadn’t been set free dis country wouldn’t ever been what it is now! Poor white folks wouldn’t never had a chance. De slave holders had most of de money and de land and dey wouldn’t let de poor white folks have a chance to own any land or anything else to speak of. Dese white folks wasn’t much better off dan we was. Dey had to work hard and dey had to worry ’bout food, clothes and shelter and we didn’t. Lots of slave owners wouldn’t allow den on deir farms among deir slaves without orders from de overseer. I don’t know why, unless he was afraid dey would stir up discontent among de niggers. Dere was lots of “underground railroading” and I rekon dat was what Old Master and others was afraid of. Us darkies was taught dat poor white folks didn’t amount to much, Course we knowed dey was white and we was black and dey was to be respected for dat, but dat was about all. White folks as well as niggers profited by Emancipation. Lincoln was a friend to all poor white folks as well as black ones and if he could a’ lived things would a’been different for ever’body. Dis has been a good old...

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Slave Narrative of Analiza Foster

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Analiza Foster Location: 1120 Sound Blount Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Location of Birth: Person County NC Age: 68 An interview with Analiza Foster, 68 of 1120 South Blount Street, Raleigh, North Carolina. I wuz borned in Person County ter Tom Line an’ Harriet Cash. My mammy belonged ter a Mr. Cash an’ pappy belonged ter Miss Betsy Woods. Both of dese owners wuz mean ter dere slaves an’ dey ain’t carin’ much if’en dey kills one, case dey’s got plenty. Dar wuz one woman dat I hyard mammy tell of bein’ beat clean ter death. De ‘oman wuz pregnant an’ she fainted in de fiel’ at de plow. De driver said dat she wuz puttin’ on, an’ dat she ort ter be beat. De master said dat she can be beat but don’t ter hurt de baby. De driver says dat he won’t, den he digs a hole in de sand an’ he puts de ‘oman in de hole, which am nigh ’bout ter her arm pits, den he kivers her up an’ straps her han’s over her haid. He takes de long bull whup an’ he cuts long gashes all over her shoulders an’ raised arms, den he walks off an’ leabes her dar fer a hour in de hot sun. De flies an’ de gnats dey worry her, an’ de sun...

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