Surname: Wolfe

Knowles Family of New Bedford, MA

The family bearing this name in New Bedford, where it is one of nearly one hundred years’ standing one, too, of prominence and wealth, is a branch of the ancient Knowles family of the town of Eastham, Barnstable county, this Commonwealth. Reference is made to some of the descendants of the brothers Thomas and James H. Knowles of Eastham, several of whose sons – at least two of the former and one of the latter – in their earlier manhood cast their lot with the people of New Bedford. The firm of Thomas Knowles & Co. for many years was one of the greatest engaged in the whale fishery business in New Bedford; and its members in turn have been succeeded in business by younger generations who have most worthily worn the family name and sustained its reputation; and today the name continues of record in and about the city of their birth connected prominently with many of the most extensive commercial establishments and banking institutions of the locality.

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Lincoln Township

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Ahrendsen, Herman. Wf. Annie; ch. Lawrence, Arthur, Alta. P. O. Manning, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 7; O. 80 ac., sec. 8. (9.) Aikman, Geo. R. Wf. Mae; ch. Ethel M. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 26. (38.) Aikman, R. F. Wf. Jennie; ch. Vera, Floyd, Olive, Donald and Myron. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 24. (34.) Asmus, Fred. Wf. Edith; ch. Dwight, Hazel and Harry. P. O. Audubon, R. 1....

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Cameron Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Aikman, C. M. Wf. Alma. P. O. Gray, R. 1. R. 160 ac., sec. 6. (26.) Breeder of Short Horn Cattle. Owner, W. F. Aikman. Aikman, W. F. Wf. Nettie; ch. Glen, Fern, Lloyd and Gladys. P. O. Gray, R. 1. R. 260 ac., sec. 7; R. 240 ac., sec. 8; O. 160 ac., sec. 6. (40.) Breeder of Short Horn Cattle. Owner, J. F. Liken. Albertsen, M. and A. Hansen. P. O. Gray, R. 1.R. 400 ac., sec. 21....

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Wolfe, Edith May Byram – Obituary

Edith May Byram, daughter of Rev. F. N. and Tabitha [McEwen] Byram, was born in Murray County, Minn., May 14, 1872, and in 1874 removed with her father’s family to Fremont, Iowa. Here she attended school and grew to womanhood, and was married to F. Wolfe on December 13, 1892. To this union four children were born – Walter Rex, Carl Vernon, Ralph Donavan, and infant daughter Marjorie Bitha, who with the bereaved husband a a large circle of friends and relatives, are left to mourn her untimely death; yet they mourn not as those that have no hope. The deceased made a public confession of faith in Christ at the age of sixteen years and was baptized into the fellowship of the Fremont Baptist Church, of which she remained a member until after her marriage, when, with her husband, she became a member of the Highland Church in which fellowship she remained until called to the church triumphant. She died Wednesday morning, Jan. 13, 19009, aged 26 years, 7 months and 29 days. A faithful wife, and affectionate mother and kind neighbor has gone to rest. The funeral was held Friday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the Fremont Baptist church and was conducted by Pastor Brown, who spoke from the text found in Rev. 3:4. Interment was made in the Cedar Township Cemetery. Those from a distance who...

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Slave Narrative of Victoria Taylor Thompson

Person Interviewed: Victoria Taylor Thompson Age: 80 My mother, Judy Taylor, named for her mistress, told me that I was born about three year before the war; that make me about 80 year old so they say down at the Indian Agency where my name is on the Cherokee rolls since all the land was give to the Indian families a long time ago. Father kept the name of ‘Doc’ Hayes, and my brother Coose was a Hayes too, but mother, Jude, Patsy, Bonaparte (Boney, we always called him), Lewis and me was always Taylors. Daddy was bought by the Taylors (Cherokee Indians); they made a trade for him with some hilly land, but he kept the name of Hayes even then. Like my mother, I was born on the Taylor place. They lived in Flint District, around the Caney settlement on Caney Creek. Lots of the Arkansas Cherokees settled around there long times before the Cherokees come here from the east, my mother said. The farm wasn’t very big, we was the only slaves on the place, and it was just a little ways from a hill everybody called Sugar Mountain, because it was covered with maple sugar trees, and an old Indian lived on the hillside, making maple sugar candy to sell and trade. Master Taylor’s house had three big rooms and a room for the loom,...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Leroy Wolfe

Thomas Leroy Wolfe was born in Tahlequah, April 12, 1871, the son of John W. Wolfe and Belle Gibson, daughter of Leroy Gibson, a white man. His grandfather, Thomas Wolfe, was one of the old settlers, and in conjunction with Blue Jacket, built the first house in Tahlequah. His father, John W. Wolfe, was district judge for some time, and at present resides within one-half mile of the capital. The subject of this sketch is the eldest of three sons. He was sent to the Tahlequah public school in 1879, and there continued till 1883, when he began work in the office of the Cherokee Advocate, devoting his time to the newspaper business for two years. In 1885 he entered the Indian university and completed a collegiate course in 1887, after which he joined the staff of the Advocate for a short time. Later he became a clerk in the mercantile establishment of R. C. Adams, as well as assistant postmaster at Viau, Illinois district. Leaving there at the end of one year, he took a position in W. T. Culbertson’s store, Savannah, Choctaw Nation. Later on Mr. Wolfe traveled for the Arrow, Telephone and Advocate, three Cherokee newspapers, and was special reporter for the first named paper during the election campaign of 1891. Mr. Wolfe is an intelligent, well-educated young man, and quite popular with his acquaintances. Like...

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Biography of Richard M. Wolfe

Richard M. Wolfe was born November 16, 1849, the son of J. H. Wolfe and Elizabeth Saunders, daughter of D. Saunders, a prominent Cherokee. When Richard was but five months old, his father left for California to search for gold in order, as he said himself, to properly educate his son, but unfortunately he never returned. At the age of seven Richard went to school for three months, and then again in two years later, passed five months at a public school. From the outbreak of the war till its ending he remained at home to take care of his mother and in 1865, when he had almost forgotten the book learning he had acquired, attended school for three terms, dropping off at McGuffy’s fourth reader. He was then 21 years of age, and the only support of his mother and grandmother, so that he was obliged to work in the fields and snatch the brief intervals between crop times to educate himself. Despite his limited opportunities, he was enabled to teach the public school at Tyners Valley soon after he became of age, and the year following became mission teacher at the Moravian Mission, Spring Creek, which institute had but five pupils at the commencement of the term, but increased to fifty-six, before he resigned, in twelve months from the date of his appointment. The refusal on the...

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Biography of Rev. J. Edward Wolfe

J. Edward Wolfe was born September 12, 1849, at Hampton, Adams County, Pennsylvania, oldest son of Jacob Wolfe, a popular merchant of the same place, and Mary Connor, of Scotch and Irish descent. Edward attended public school until the outbreak of the war, when he became an apprentice to the printer’s trade in the Gazette office, Hanover, York County, Pennsylvania. Here he remained several years, attaching himself for a while to the Carlisle Volunteer, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. Later he held a position in the government printing office, at Washington, D. C., after which he was led into evangelistic work through the Rev. E. P. Hammon, with whom he went to Philadelphia and Newport, Massachusetts. At this point he was city missionary, and remained for one year. During this time he had many rough and strange experiences. In order to aid him in his battle against rum, he established a newspaper, which soon stirred the ire of the whisky-sellers, and he was prosecuted for libel by a notorious rum-seller. Being refused bail, he was imprisoned for three days, and during this time the paper was issued from the jail. The consequence was that on December 11, the election day, the temperance party carried the day by a plurality of 929. On this day he was assaulted by a cowardly, prize-fighting rum-seller, who knocked him down and treated him in a...

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Biography of Ulysses Schuyler Wolfe

Ulysses Schuyler Wolfe is sole proprietor of the Alfalfa Milling Company of Emporia. This is a business of more than local proportions and makes a specialty of converting the great alfalfa crop of Kansas into special feed and combination of feed for livestock. Mr. Wolfe had been a resident of Kansas since early boyhood and his family were among the early settlers of Emporia. His original ancestors came from England in colonial times and many of them settled in Maryland and Southern Pennsylvania. Grandfather David Wolfe was born in Maryland in 1821 and died in Hagerstown of that state in 1873. He was a farmer and planter. Amos Wolfe, father of the Emporia miller, was born in Frederickstown, Maryland, April 9, 1841. When a young man he went to Lebanon, Indiana, where he married Mary Jane Hamilton. She was born November 16, 1834, in Indiana, and died in Emporia, January 16, 1899. From Indiana Amos Wolfe and family moved to Emporia in 1878. He was a farmer in Lyon County until 1892, then engaged in blacksmithing, but about 1898 retired. His home was in Emporia, but he died in Hot Springs, Arkansas, March, 1903. He was a republican and belonged to the Improved Order of Red Men. He and his wife had the following children: Alice, whose first husband was O. R. Hamilton, a farmer, and who is now...

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Wolfe, J. T. – Obituary

Former Union Resident Dies In California The San Anselmo (California) Herald gives the following account of the death of J. T. Wolfe, who, with his wife and three sons, made their home in South Union some years ago. John Taylor Wolfe, 83, a pioneer and educator of Wyoming, who had been a resident of San Anselmo for 12 years, died Saturday morning in a San Francisco hospital following an illness of two weeks. He had been in failing health since the death of his wife, Mrs. Bessie Wolfe, two years ago. Born in Indiana, Mr. Wolfe, with his parents had gone to Minnesota where he had grown to manhood. He had later driven across the plains alone with a team and wagon and settled in northern Wyoming, where he established the first public school. He was the first superintendent of schools in a large county which took in the greater part of northern Wyoming. For many years Mr. Wolfe held the office of justice of the peace and was the only man in that part of the state who knew anything about legal work. He prepared many legal documents in his own handwriting. His advice and assistance was sought by many. He was called Judge Wolfe and was one of the most prominent men in early days in Wyoming. Owen Wister’s story, The Virginian, was written about the locality...

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Wolfe, Harmon Upton – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Harmon Upton Wolfe, 96, of La Grande, died Nov. 5 at a local care center. A memorial service begins at 11:30 a.m. Saturday at the Summerville Baptist Church. Harmon was born on Dec. 21, 1910, to Jeptha Thomas and Jane Rose (McCullough) Wolfe in La Grande. He was married to Alberta Kirby Wolfe for 70 years. She preceded him in death on Nov. 30, 2005. He was a member of the Summerville Baptist Church and was a 75-year member of the Elks Lodge. Harmon is survived by two daughters, Kay Warren of Superior, Mont., and Susan Mercer of Kirkland, Wash.; one son, Dr. Jeffry Wolfe, of Boring; and numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Summerville Baptist Church. The Observer – Obituaries for the week ending November 10,...

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Wolfe, Velma Laura Russell – Obituary

Velma Laura Wolfe, 79, of Oskaloosa, died Friday, March 14, in the Mahaska County Hospital in Oskaloosa. Graveside service and interment was held 1 p.m. Monday in the Old White Cemetery in Oskaloosa, with Elder Jimmy Kerr officiating. Garland-Van Arkel-Langkamp Funeral Chapel in Oskaloosa was in charge of arrangements. She was born Aug. 2, 1917, in Mahaska County to Richard Winfield and Victoria Boyd Russell. She married Orville Raymond “Tom” Wolfe. He died Aug. 20, 1978. Survivors include a brother: Arthur Russell of Oskaloosa. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; a sister: Victoria Powell; and two brothers: Tracey Russell and Joseph Russell. Tom and Velma Wolfe had no children. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Wolfe, Orville Raymond Thomas ‘Tom’ – Obituary

Tom Wolfe, 74, 610 D. Ave. W., died Sunday afternoon at Mahaska County Hospital in Oskaloosa. He was born March 1, 1904, in Fremont, to Samuel Wolfe and Minnie Failyer. He later married Velma Russell. Surviving are his wife, Velma, and many nieces and nephews. He was a veteran of World War II. Services will be Tuesday at 2 p.m. at the Garland-Van Arkel in Oskaloosa with the Rev. James Kerr officiating. Burial will be in the White Oak Cemetery near Oskaloosa. Tom Wolfe and Velma Russell had no children. Contributed by: Shelli...

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