Surname: Winn

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to...

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Bloody Scenes in Alabama and Georgia

At this period, some exciting scenes occurred in the region now known as North Alabama. We have already followed a party of emigrants to the Cumberland. Many others flocked to that country, and it soon became well settled, for a wild country. The Upper Creeks and Cherokees continually made war upon these Cumberland people. The French, upon the Wabash, had, for a long time, carried on a commerce, near the sites of the present towns of Tuscumbia and Florence. So long as M. Viez was at the head of this trade, the Cumberland people were not harassed; but, recently, he had been succeeded by others, who supplied the Indians with arms, and encouraged them to attack the American settlements. The latter had only acted upon the defensive, but it was now determined to advance upon the frontier towns of the Indians. June 1 1787: One hundred and thirty men assembled, from different parts of the Cumberland region, and marched, under Colonel James Robertson, to the Tennessee river, piloted by two Chickasaws. David Hays was dispatched from Nashville with boats, laden with provisions, destined for the Muscle Shoals. Descending the Cumberland, he was furiously attacked by the Indians, at the mouth of Duck River, and, after some of his men had been killed and others wounded, he returned to Nashville with his boats. Owing to this the horsemen were without...

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Biography of Ed. F. Winn

No work that might attempt to tell the story of the settlement and civilization of Idaho would be complete if it should contain no account of the hard, brave work performed by Deputy Sheriff and Deputy United States Marshal Ed. F. Winn, in ridding the country of the gangs of thieves, cut-throats and outlaws that once infested it. A book devoted to the exploits of Winn and other Federal and civil officers in this part of the country would be of thrilling interest. Ed. F. Winn is a native of Brownsville, Pennsylvania, and was born October 29, 1857. His parents, Isaac and Mary Jane (Moore) Winn, came to the United States from Lancashire, England, soon after their marriage and settled in Pennsylvania, where they are vet living, Mr. Winn being still in the active practice of his profession, as a civil engineer. They are people of the highest worth, ornaments of the community in which they live, and have been lifelong members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. They had three sons and a daughter, and Ed. F. Winn was their second child. He was educated and learned the carpenter’s trade in his native state, and in 1875, when lie was about eighteen, went to Iowa and thence to Nebraska. At Omaha he found work as a carpenter, in the employ of the Union Pacific Railroad Company. He was sent...

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Biography of William M. Winn

WILLIAM M. WINN. – Although the subject of this sketch has not been domiciled within the borders of Union county a sufficient length of time to be called a pioneer, still he has been here long enough to thoroughly demonstrate to all that he is a man of capabilitities and enterprise and favored with those qualities that make the upright man and substantial citizen, while his industry and thrift are apparent, as well as his good judgment and financial foresight. On December 28, 1858, he was born to Thomas G. and Phoebe (Orton) Winn, in Springville, Utah, and there he was reared on a farm and attended the public schools during his boyhood days. The family removed to Idaho and later returned to Utah, whence they went to Colorado and from that place Mr. Winn came to Union county. It was in 1898 that he settled here purchasing a farm of three hundred and twenty acres about twelve miles south from Lagrande. He also owns one hundred and sixty acres of fine timber, making his entire estate four hundred and eighty acres. His home place is well improved and is one of the valuable farms of the county. He is enterrising and industrious and is very successful in raising stock and the fruits of the soil. Mr. Winn started in this world for himself when he was nineteen years...

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Winn, Laura Susan – Obituary

Died-In La Grande, Oregon, Tuesday May 25, 1920, Laura Susanna Winn, age 30 years, 7 months and 2 days. Mrs. Winn was a daughter of Fred Ratz, of Union. The funeral took place from the undertaking parlors, Union, Thursday, May 27 at 3 p. m. Services were conducted by Mrs. Julia R. Hackman, of La Grande. Mrs. Merton Kiddle of La Grande sang some beautiful solos. Among those coming from La Grande were Mesdames Hackman, Kiddle, Young, Gates, and Kinney, Miss Young and Miss Hackman. No date on obituary Contributed by: Larry...

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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