Surname: Willis

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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Ralph Bacon Genealogy

The Bacon Family Genealogy descends the Bacon family tree through the children of Ralph Bacon, 2nd. Ralph was born in New York State abt the year 1777. At the age of 17, about the year 1794, he traveled to Painesville Ohio. Eventually acquiring some land there, he would marry Mary Jourden in 1801. In 1820 he moved his family to Crawford County, Ohio, owning houses and land in the townships of Liberty and Whetstone. His wife died 5 Oct 1845, he died 15 Jun 1849. This union would produce 13 offspring, twelve of whom would marry and raise families of their own. This Bacon Family Genealogy is their story.

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Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to...

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Moravian Massacre at Gnadenbrutten

In the early part of the year 1763 two Moravian missionaries, Post and Heckewelder, established a mission among the Tuscarawa Indians, and in a few years they had three nourishing missionary stations, viz: Shoenbrun, Gnadenbrutten and Salem, which were about five miles apart and fifty miles west of the present town of Steubenville, Ohio. During our Revolutionary War their position being midway between the hostile Indians (allies of the British) on the Sandusky River, and our frontier settlements, and therefore on the direct route of the war parties of both the British Indian allies and the frontier settlers, they...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Biographical Sketch of Nathaniel Parker Willis

Born in Portland, Maine, January 20, 1806, died at his country home, Idlewild, Cornwall-on-the-Hudson, January 20, 1867. His chief works are: Melanie, Lady Jane and other poems; Pencillings by the Way; Inklings of Adventure; Romance of Travel, comprising Tales of Five Lands; People I Have Met, or Pictures of Society and People of Mark; A Health Trip to the Tropics; Out of Doors at Idlewild; Paul Fane, or Parts of a life else Untold, a Novel. Edgar Allen Poe, in a review of the literary work of N. P. Willis said: “As a writer of `sketches’ properly so called, Mr. Willis is unequaled. Sketches especially of society, are his forte, and they are so for no other reason than that they afford him the best opportunity of introducing the personal Willis or more distinctly because this species of composition is most susceptible of impression from his personal character.” Among his short poems, perhaps the most popular are “May” and “The Belfry...

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Benjamin Willis Genealogy

Benjamin1 Willis, who d. at Keene, Mar. 22, 1820, aged 80, was probably the father of Benjamin2, 1, of Sullivan. 1. Benjamin2 Willis, son of Benjamin1, was a farmer and res. Keene and Sullivan; d. in Sullivan, Aug. 26, 1837, aged 75; m. Mar. 17, 1785, Annis Briggs b. Norton, Mass., Sept. 25, 1759, d. Sullivan, Jan. 22, 1831; dau. of Elisha and Mary Briggs of Keene. Ch. b. Keene: Mary3 (christened Polly), b. Mar. 17, 1785; m. John Newman (q. v.) Sarah3, b. 1789; m. Robert. Hall (q. v.) Annis3, b. May 25, 1794. Asenath3, b. unk.; d. Keene, unm., June 10, 1824. Fanny3, b. Dec. 6, 1798. 2. Annis3 Willis, dau. of Benjamin2, 1, m. Justus Chapin, b. Alstead, Mar. 31, 1790, d. there, Sept. 20, 1869, son of Justus and Martha (Taylor) Chapin. They lived in Gilsum and Alstead and she d. in Alstead, Mar. 13, 1867. She had six ch.: Martha Taylor4 Chapin, b. Gilsum, Aug. 18, 1816, d. Marlow, May 29, 1878; m. Mar. 11, 1852, Ephraim Pratt Evardon, b. Winchester, Oct. 21, 1798, d. Alstead, Jan. 15, 1867, son of John and Rebecca (Pratt) Evardon. Res. Gilsum, and had: Martha Ann5 Evardon, b. Jan. 17, 1854; m. June 6, 1871, Edgar Cyrus Farnum, b. Marlow, July 4, 1848, son of Heman and Lusylvia (Lowell) Farnum. Res. Marlow. Ch.: Rosa Belle6 Farnum, b. Marlow,...

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Slave Narrative of Charles Willis

Person Interviewed: Charles Willis Place of Birth: Lawrence County, Mississippi I found Mr. Willis seated on the front porch eating lemon drops out of a bag. He consumed the whole bag during the interview which lasted about 3 hours. He talked slowly and between his sucks on the lemon drops. He is hard of hearing and is losing his eyesight. He possesses a good sense of humor. Talked incessantly of matrimony and pretty gals. I was born in Lawrence County, Mississippi on the Sharp Plantation. My missus was name Sang Sharp and my mastah was name John Sharp. My mastah had 10 or 12 slaves and we done very well. Jining our place, the folks owned hundreds of slaves and jest beat them nearly to death. Even beat blood outta their back. I was whipped once by the white folks. That one time was by my mistress and don’t fergit she whipped me. I never remembah having shoes on only in winter time. Ever body wore them jest in winter time less they was able to buy some. We diden’ work Sadday afternoon and Sundays and doing of dis time off and in evenin’s off we would make money. My mother was a right yeller woman. She worked in the fields jest like I done. When she stood up, her hair fell on the floor. I tuck hair after...

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Biography of Jesse Stallings Willis

Jesse Stallings Willis, son of Rev. Cary C. Willis, was born May 8, 1835, in Muscogee County, Georgia. He was married to Amanda D. Horne, daughter of Rev. Jesse R. Horne of Houston .County, Georgia, on May 25, 1859. On March 1, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, Forty-fifth Infantry, and was seriously wounded June 27, 1862, in the Seven Days Fight Around Richmond. He was taken by a slow train on a day coach to the railroad point nearest his home in Georgia, hauled from there in a spring wagon twenty-five miles in an unconscious condition and was for many months recovering from his wounds. In 1869 Mr. Willis moved to Hawkinsville, Pulaski County, Georgia, where he lived the remainder of his life. He was a supply merchant and cotton buyer for forty-one years in Hawkinsville and served as a deacon in the Baptist Church for approximately fifty years. Mr. and Mrs. Willis were the parents of the following children: Mrs. McC. Pate (deceased), Mr. Julian B. Willis (deceased), Mr. W. C. Willis of Macon, Georgia; Mr. George Willis of Jacksonville, Florida; Mrs. James R. Huff, and Mrs. Tim J. Manson of Chattanooga, Tennessee; and Miss Clyde Willis of New York City. Mr. and Mrs. Willis celebrated their golden wedding in Hawkinsville in 1909. This anniversary was attended by several hundred people and was one of the outstanding...

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Slave Narrative of Mariah Callaway

Interviewer: Ross Person Interviewed: Mariah Callaway Location: Georgia [TR: A significant portion of this interview was repeated in typescript; where there was a discrepancy, the clearer version was used. Where a completely different word was substituted, ‘the original’ refers to the typewritten page.] Mrs. Mariah Callaway sat in a chair opposite the writer and told her freely of the incidents of slavery as she remembered them. To a casual observer it will come as a surprise to know the woman was blind. She is quite old, but her thoughts were clearly and intelligently related to the writer. Mrs. Callaway was born in Washington, Wilkes County, Georgia probably during the year 1852, as she estimated her age to be around 12 or 13 years when freedom was declared. She does not remember her mother and father, as her mother died the second day after she was born, so the job of rearing her and a small brother fell on her grandmother, Mariah Willis, for whom she was named. Mrs. Callaway stated that the old master, Jim Willis, kept every Negro’s age in a Bible: but after he died the Bible was placed upstairs in the gallery and most of the pages were destroyed. The following is a story of the purchase of Mrs. Callaway’s grandfather as related by her. “My grandfather come directly from Africa and I never shall forget...

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Slave Narrative of Susan Castle

Interviewer: Sadie B. Hornsby Person Interviewed: Susan Castle Location: Athens, Georgia On a beautiful morning in April, the interviewer found Susan sitting in the door of her cabin. When asked if she would like to talk about the old plantation days, she replied; “Yes Ma’am, I don’t mind tellin’ what I know, but for dat I done forgot I sho’ ain’t gwine make nothin’ up. For one thing, I ain’t never lived on no plantation. I was a house servant in town.” She added: “Do you mind me axin’ you one favor?” Consent was given and she continued: “Dat is, please don’t call me Aunt Susan; it makes me feel lak I was a hundred years old. “I was borned in Clarke County, March 7, 1860; I believes dat’s what dey say. Mudder was named Fannie and Pappy’s name was Willis. Us chillun called ‘im Pappy lak he was de onliest one in de world. He fust belonged to Marse Maxwell of Savannah, Georgia. I was so little I disremembers how Pappy come by de name of Castle. In all de seben of us chillun, I didn’t have but one brudder, and his name was Johnny. My five sisters was Mary, Louvenia, Rosa, Fannie, and Sarah. All I ‘members ’bout us as chilluns was dat us played lak chilluns will do. “In de quarters us had old timey beds...

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Biography of Edward C. Willis

Edward C. Willis, superintendent of the State Orphans Home at Atchison, is a graduate of Dartmouth College and came to kansas nearly forty years ago with the equipment and training of a oultured New Englander. His work in this state had been largely of an educational nature, and he had taught, had been superintendent of schools, and was finally appointed to his present post at Atchison, where he had served with the exception of two years since 1907. Nearly all of Mr. Willis’ ancestors were colonial families of New England. The Willis family came originally from the northern part of England and settled in Massachnsetts as early as 1638. His grandfather, Joseph Willis, was born at Mount Holly, Vermont, in 1779, was a Vermont farmer, served as a soldier in the War of 1812, and died at Bridgewater, Vermont, in 1866. He married Hannah O’Headle, who was of Irish descent. Joseph E. Willis, father of Edward C., was born at Mount Holly, Vermont, in 1815. He grew up in his native locality, was a Vermont farmer and became a prominent citizen of that state. For many terms he served as a selectman at Bridgewater, and was a member of the Vermont Legislature more than twenty years. At the beginning of the Civil war in 1861 he enlisted and became colonel of a Vermont regiment, seeing active service until the...

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Biographical Sketch of Malcolm Chandler Willis

Willis, Malcolm Chandler; insurance; born, Cleveland, Oct. 5, 1871; son of George Henry and Martha Tiebout Willis; educated, public schools, Cleveland; married, June 21, 1899, Elsie Dutton; with Insurance Exchange for twenty years; sec’y thirteen years; director The Home Financing Co., The Mudge & Beech Co.; sec’y Cleveland Fire Insurance Exchange; member Insurance Society of Cleveland; Chamber of Commerce and Clifton...

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Willis, Laura Ethel – Obituary

Wallowa, Wallowa County, Oregon Services Held For Laura Willis Mrs. Laura Ethel Willis of Joseph passed away on Thursday, April 26, 1973 at Wallowa Memorial Hospital where she has been a patient for six days. She was the daughter of Alfred C. and Matilda Toney and was born in Joseph on February 18, 1900. She had lived in and near Joseph all her life. On Nov. 22, 1924 she was married to William Jasper Willis who preceded her in death in 1949 She was a member of Wallowa Lake American Legion auxiliary 157 of Joseph and a life member of Joseph Chapter 67 OES. She is survived by two sisters: Mrs. Lloyd (Lola) Quinn of Joseph and Mrs. Earl (Hallie) Pinkley of Enterprise; and nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral services were Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Bollman Chapel with Rev. Al Grissom officiating. Organist was Wanda Sorweide and soloist was Clifford Collinsworth who sang “Beautiful Isle Of Somewhere” and “In The Garden”. Casket bearers were: Wayne Davis, George grandy, R.G. Hicks, Jean Butler, Robert Sorweide, and Frank Guthrie, and internment was in the Prairie Creek Cemetery. Wallowa County Chieftain, Wallowa County, Oregon, May 3, 1973 Contributed by: Gary...

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A. G. Willis

Private, Btry. B, 30th Div., 113th Regt.; of Beaufort County; son of E. K. and Mrs. Willis. Entered service June 2, 1917, at Washington, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, transferred to Kelly Field, to Camp Richfield, Tex., then to Camp Jackson. Promoted to rank of Sergt. Mustered out at Camp Jackson Dec. 31,...

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