Surname: Wilkinson

Descendants of William Sumner of Dorchester, MA

The Sumner family, to which the late Mrs. George Barstow Stetson belonged, is an old and prominent family of New England, descended from one William Sumner, who was born at Bicester, England, in 1605, son of Roger Sumner, of Bicester, Oxfordshire, and his wife Joane (Franklin).

William Sumner, the only child of Roger and Joane, married Oct. 22, 1625, Mary West, and they came to America with their four children in 1636, locating at Dorchester, Mass. He was made a freeman of the Colony May 17, 1637, and held many offices of importance, being selectman for nearly a quarter of a century. He was deputy from Dorchester to the General Court for eight years. He died Dec. 9. 1688, surviving his wife, who died June 7, 1676. Both are buried at Dorchester.

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Some Descendants of Lawrence Wilkinson of Providence, RI

Lawrence Wilkinson, the first of the race here in New England, was born in Lanchester, County of Durham, England, a son of William Wilkinson by his wife Mary, sister of Sir John Conyers, Bart., and the grandson of Lawrence Wilkinson, of Harpley House, Durham. He was a loyalist, and at the surrender of Newcastle, 1644, was taken prisoner by the Parliamentary and Scotch troops. At this time he held a lieutenant’s commission. He was deprived of his property, and his estates sequestered by order of Parliament. After having obtained special permission from Lord Fairfax, chief commander of the Parliamentary army, he embarked with his wife and child for New England, leaving, according to Somerby, in 1652. Arriving at Providence he signed the civil compact and received a gift of twenty-five acres of land and commenced his pioneer life. He was admitted as one of the original “Proprietors of Providence.” He soon acquired a large real estate, and held a prominent position among his fellow citizens. He was frequently chosen to fill offices of trust in the infant colony; was elected a member of the Legislature in 1659 and subsequently. He was an active business man. He participated in the Indian wars. He lived in his adopted country nearly half a century. His death occurred in 1692.

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Descendancts of John Remington of Haverhill, MA

As early as 1661 John Remington and his wife Abigail were at Haverhill, where their children, Daniel and Hannah, were born. John Remington is credited by one writer as being the emigrant ancestor from Wales of the Rhode Island Remingtons. He appears of record as early as 1669 at Jamestown, R. I., where Aug. 28th of that year he and two others were ordered to assemble inhabitants of Conanicut Island to consider what might be most suitable for defense and preservation against any invasion or insurrection of the Indians. He had been earlier at Haverhill, Mass. (1661), and Andover. He was one of the grantees in 1677 of what became East Greenwich, R. I. He and his sons were taxed in 1680. In 1695 he gave his son Thomas Remington, of Warwick, a deed for his Haverhill interests, and redeeded to him the same in 1709, he then being apparently of Warwick, R. I., the former deed having become “damnified through disaster.”

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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District

Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District Adams, Absalom Adams, James M. Allums, Britton Amoss, James Barnes, William Bays, John R. Bays, Moses Bays, Nathaniel Boman, Isham Boman, Larkin Boman, Levi Boman, Robert Boman, William Brooks, Isaac R. Brooks, John Brooks, William Burson, Isaac C. Butler, Whitaker Cardwell, William Collum, James Crawley, Bird Crawley, Turner Culberson, David H. Culberson, James H. Culberson, Jeremiah C. Curry, James Daniel, James L. Daniel, William B. Day, Stephen Dennis, Peter Dickson, Thomas Dunn, Barney Ethredge, Bryant Ethridge, Zachariah Funderburk, Washington Furgison, Burrell Gibson, Churchill Gibson, William Glenn, James Gresham, Davis E. Grizzle, Kinchen Guyse, Joel Harbuck, Henry, Sr. Harbuck, Henry, Jr. Harbuck, William Hendon, Henry T. Hicks, Jacob Hicks, Littleberry Hicks, Nathaniel Holmes, Benjamin Holt, William Hopson, William Horton, Jeremiah Jackson, Thomas Jenkins, John Jenkins, Robert Jennings, Robert M. Johnson, Lewis Johnson, Mordecai Jones, Willie Keeth, James M. Kilgore, Robert Kilgore, William Kirkland, John Kolb, Jonathan Latimer, Samuel M. Layton, Thomas S. Lewis, Henry. Lipham, John McCullars, Andrew McPost, Lindsey Mays, James Mays, Robert Meadows, Simeon Meadows, Vincent Miller, John C. Mobley, William Moran, Jesse Moran, William J. Morgan, Wilson Norman, Jeremiah Pace, Noel Patterson, James Patterson, John, Jr. Patterson, Thomas Patterson, William Peppin, Noah Phipps, Thomas Poe, Gilbert Poe, Jonathan Poe, Solomon Post, John B. Post, Samuel B. Powers, James G. Redding, John Reeves, James Rigsby, Allen Rigsby, Eli Rigsby,...

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Earliest Known Traders on Arkansas River

With the help of contemporary records it is possible to identify some of the early traders at the Mouth of the Verdigris. Even before the Louisiana Purchase, hardy French adventurers ascended the Arkansas in their little boats, hunting, trapping, and trading with the Indians, and recorded their presence if not their identity in the nomenclature of the adjacent country and streams, now sadly corrupted by their English-speaking successors. 1Many tributaries of Arkansas River originally bore French names. There was the Fourche La Feve named for a French family [Thwaites, R. G., editor, Early Western Travels, vol. xiii, 156]; the...

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Establishment of Fort Smith in 1817

The white population in Arkansas in 1817 had increased to several thousand, whose protection, as well as that of the Cherokee people living in that territory, from the continued hostilities of the Osage, required the establishment of a military post at the western border dividing the white settlements from the Osage. From Saint Louis came further news of threatened hostilities by the Osage near Clermont’s Town, and a report 1Niles Register, (Baltimore) vol. xiii, 176. that Major William Bradford with a detachment of United States riflemen, and accompanied by Major Long, topographical engineer, had left that city for the...

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History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

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Gleanings from English Records about New England Families

The classic work often cited by more contemporaneous authors on early New England families and the records of them found within the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House, Strand, the Public Record Office, Fetter Lane, and the British Museum, Bloomsbury, while on a visit in London during the summer and fall of 1879.

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Descendants of Richard Borden of Fall River MA

The Borden family is an ancient one both here in New England and over the water in old England, as well as one of historic interest and distinction. The New England branch has directly or indirectly traced the lineage of the American ancestor, Richard Borden, many generations back in English history. His first English forbear went over to England from Bourdonnay, Normandy, as a soldier under William the Conqueror, and after the battle of Hastings — A.D. 1066 — was assigned lands in the County of Kent, where the family afterward became useful, wealthy and influential, the village where...

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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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Early Incidents in the Mississippi Territory

Napoleon Bonaparte had turned his eagle eye to the rich province of Louisiana, and it was ceded by Spain to France. He contemplated its occupation, with a large army, and probably entertained designs of conquest against portions of the United States; but, becoming deeply involved in wars with the whole of Europe, he reluctantly relinquished these intentions, and ceded Louisiana to the United States for sixty millions of francs. Governor Claiborne, with a large number of emigrants, who had already flocked to Natchez from all parts of the Union for the purpose of occupying Louisiana, sailed down the Mississippi, with Wilkinson and his forces, and took formal possession of the city of New Orleans, in behalf of the United States. He had been appointed the Governor of the Louisiana Territory. He left the people of the Mississippi Territory duly impressed with a deep sense of obligation for his valuable public services. Cato West, the Territorial Secretary, discharged the executive duties until his successor arrived. The distance of Natchez from the Tombigby was so great that Congress authorized the President to appoint an additional Superior Court Judge for the benefit of the people settled upon that river. The Hon. Harry Toulmin was selected. He was born at Taunton, in England, the 7th April 1766, and descended from a learned and respectable family. He became a pastor of the Unitarian church,...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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