Surname: White

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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The Cherokee Revolt – Indian Wars

From the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia and Tennessee to Arkansas and their establishment upon the reservation allotted to them by treaty with the Government in Arkansas, they have, until the period of this outbreak to the narrative of which this chapter is devoted, been considered as among the least dangerous and most peaceable of the tribes in that region. But through various causes, chief among which has been notably the introduction among them of a horde of those pests of the West the border ruffians; these half wild, half-breed Nomads were encouraged by these Indians, as it appeared, for the sake of the liquor traffic. According to the official accounts of this attempt to reopen hostilities, it appears that on the 11th of April, 1872, it originated with a man named J. J. Kesterson, living in the Cherokee nation, near the Arkansas line, about fifty miles from Little Rock. On that day he went to Little Rock, and filed information against one Proctor, also a white man, married to a Cherokee woman, for assaulting with intent to kill him while in his saw mill, on the 13th of February. Proctor fired a revolver at Kesterson, the ball striking him just above the left eye, but before he could fire again Kesterson escaped. Proctor, at the time, was under indictment in the Snake District for the murder of his...

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Montana Constitutional Convention Members 1889

The following persons were members of the constitutional convention: William A. Clark, Walter M. Bickford, J. F. Brazelton, Peter Breen, E. U Aiken, Simon R. Buford, William Mason Bullard, Walter A. Burleigh, Alex. F. Burns, Andrew J. Bums, Edward Burns, James Edward Cardwell, B. Piatt Carpenter, Milton Canby, William A. Chessman, Timothy E. Collins, Charles E. Conrad, Walter Cooper, Thomas F. Courtney, Arthur J. Craven, W. W. Dixon, D. M. Durfee, William Dyer. William T. Field, George O. Eaton, J. E. Gaylord, Paris Gibson, Warren C. Gillette, O. F. Goddard, Fielding L. Graves, R. E. Hammond, Charles S. Hartman, Henri J. Haskell, Luke D. Hatch, Lewis H. Hirshfield, Richard O. Hickman, S. S. Hobson, Joseph Hogan, Thomas Joyes, Allen R. Joy, J. E. Kanouse, A. R. Joy, W. J. Kennedy, H. Knippenberg, Hiram Kuowls, Conrad Kohrs, C. H. Loud, Llewellyn A. Luce, Martin Maginnis, J. E. Marion, Charles S. Marshall, William Mayger, P. W. McAdow, C. R. Middleton, Samuel Mitchell, William Muth, Alfred Myers, William Parberry, W. R. Ramsdell, G. J. Reek, John C. Robinson, L. Rotwitt, J. C Rickards, Francis E. Sargeant, Leopold F. Schmidt, George W. Stapleton, Joseph K. Toole, J. R. Toole, Charles S. Warren, William H. Watson, H. R. Whitehill, Charles M. Webster, George B, Winston, Aaron C. Whittier, David G. Brown. Helena Independent, Aug. 27, 1889. J. E. Rickards was born in Delaware in...

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Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Cattaraugus Reservation, in Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Erie Counties, New York, as delineated on the map, occupies both sides of Cattaraugus creek. It is 9.5 miles long on a direct east and west line, averages 3 miles in width at the center, dropping at is eastern line an additional rectangle of 2 by 3 miles. A 6-mile strip on the north and 2 “mile blocks” at diagonal corners are occupied by white people, and litigation is pending as to their rights and responsibilities. The Seneca Nation claims that the permit or grant under which said lands were occupied and...

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Biography of Curtis White

Curtis White, a retired carpenter of Concord, was born at Bow, N.H., April 4, 1861, son of Daniel White, of that place. The grandfather, Isaac White, who was an early settler of Bow, went there from Pembroke, and converted a grant of land into a good farm home for himself and his family. Daniel, the youngest son, was a blacksmith and stone worker. He purchased a farm opposite his father’s, and there carried on stone work as well as some farming. His death occurred March 16, 1825, after a lingering and painful illness, in the course of which he was obliged to undergo several and painful surgical operations. He married Mary Carter, daughter of Moses Carter, of the old Concord family of that name. They had three children besides Curtis. William, the eldest, died in October, 1826. Their daughter, Mary Ann, is also deceased; and the second son, Daniel C., is a practising dentist in Alton, Ill. Curtis White, who was the second-born of his parents’ children, followed various lines of business throughout his active period. After leaving the district school, he worked at farming for a time. He also did some black-smithing and carpentry, and for a while he was employed in a saw and grist mill. For many years Mr. White was a carpenter in Concord, and for about ten years he was engaged in carriage-building in...

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Biographical Sketch of George White

George White, the well known implement dealer and auctioneer of Newman, was born near Glasgow, Barren County, Kentucky, August 18, 1842, and is a son of M. L. and Mary (Biby) White. Middleton White was born in Barren County, Kentucky and moved to Edgar County, Illinois, where he was married. His wife was also from near Glasgow. Kentucky. ‘They are both dead and buried in the Paris cemetery. George White came to Newman and located in business in about 1874, since which time his business has steadily grown until he is known as one of the most successful and extensive implement dealers in the entire County. He also handles the Mitchell wagon and several makes of buggies and carriages. His sales run from $25,000 to $35,000 annually. In 1844 Mr. White was united in marriage to Miss Della Clark, who is a native of Kentucky. They have two children: Henry W., who will graduate from the Chicago Homeopathic School of Medicine in March, 1901, and Fred, who is in business with his father. George White has here held the office of township supervisor and while he resided in Edgar County held the same office. In 1861 he volunteered in Company E, Twelfth Illinois Infantry and served through the entire Civil war. During the month of February especially his services are in great demand as a public auctioneer. He is...

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Biography of Sulvanas J. White

SULVANAS J. WHITE is a well known resident of Union county, near the town of Lagrande, having been identified with the industrial life of that city for some time and having also operated in the mercantile business here, being attended with success and also manifesting his characteristic ability and integrity during his residence here, while also he is one of the pioneers of the northwest, as his father was also, and has wrought for many years in the development and for the progress of this and adjoining states. Charles F. and Elizabeth (Buchanan) White are the parents of our subject, who was born to them in Stark county, Illinois, on January 6, 1846. It was in 1851 that the parents determined to try their fortunes in the west, and accordingly fitted out the requisite conveyances and ox teams and started on the long and dreary journey across barren plain and rugged mountains infested with dangers of savages and wild beasts, besides the lurking disease that was then sweeping across the country. In due time they landed in Portland, having lost some from the train by accident and one by the Indians. The savages charged toll for crossing the streams, and had the train not been large doubtless would have massacred them all. Captain Dray piloted them in safety to their destination, and after one winter spent there the father...

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Biographical Sketch of Esquire William White

Esquire William White settled in Montgomery County in 1836. He is a brother of Benjamin White, who lives near Danville. He married Anna Fletchrall, of Maryland, and their children were John, Daniel, Ann, William, Benjamin, Stephen, Mary, Dorcas, and Elizabeth. Elizabeth, a sister of William White, Sr., married William Smith and settled near...

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Biographical Sketch of Benjamin White, Sr.

Benjamin White, Sr., was a native of Wales. He married Elizabeth Smith, and their son Benjamin, Jr., married Rebecca Chesell. They all lived in Montgomery Co., Md. Benjamin, a son of Benjamin White, Jr., was born November 4, 1796. He was married in 1821 to Rebecca Darby, who died, and in 1831 he married Lucy Scott. In 1837 they came to Missouri and settled in Montgomery County. Their children were Edward G., William H.., Richard G., Benjamin, Susan, Mary A., and Sarah E., all of whom are married and -living in’ Montgomery...

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Biographical Sketch of Matthew L. White

Matthew L. White was born and raised in Virginia, but removed to East Tennessee, from there to Alabama, and in 1829 he settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., and entered the land upon which the celebrated Pinnacle Rock stands. He married Rhoda Stagdon, and they had Nancy, William, Thomas S., James H., Isaac M., John R., Mary J., Rebecca, Samuel M., Margaret A., and Martha...

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Abstracts of Wills on File in the City of New York Surrogate’s Office 1660-1680

Abstracts of wills on file in the surrogate’s office city of New York 1660-1680. From May 1787 to the present, county surrogate’s courts have recorded probates. However, the court of probates and court of chancery handled estates of deceased persons who died in one county but who owned property in another. An 1823 law mandated that all probates come under the jurisdiction of the county surrogate’s courts. Each surrogate’s court has a comprehensive index to all probate records, including the unrecorded probate packets. Interestingly enough, there are wills existing and on record at the Surrogate’s Office in New York City for the time-span of 1660-1680. Genealogical extracts of these wills have been provided below.

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. L. C. White, Dr.

(See Ward). Nancy Louisa, daughter of Burges Gaither and Ann Eliza (Gunter) Chandler was born in Delaware District, July 30, 1884, and was educated in Willie Halsell College, Vinita. graduating in 1900. Married at Vinita, May 22, 1907, Dr. Lee Carl, son of Dr. George W. and Georgia A. (Adair) White, born December 25, 1873 in Warren County, Kentucky. He graduated from Kentucky University in 1905 and is an alumni of the Louisville University. He is a Mason and an Odd Fellow. They are the parents of Carl Chandler White, born March 9, 1919. Mrs. White is a member of the Methodist church and is a Rebecca. She is the youngest sister of Hon. T. A. Chandler, Congressman from the First District of Oklahoma. Dr. White enjoys a lucrative practice at...

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Biographical Sketch of Daniel White

Daniel White, son of Samuel White, was born near the city of Richmond, in Madison County, Kentucky, February 26, 1831. He remained in his birthplace until he was about twenty-one years of age, during which time he was engaged in farming and working for his father. After becoming of age he was engaged in farming for two years, and then worked in a mill three years. August 9, 1862, he was enrolled in Company F, Seventh Kentucky Cavalry, and was in the service during the war, being in several battles and skirmishes. After the war Mr. White moved to Tazewell County, Illinois, where for seven years he was engaged in farming. He then moved to Piatt County, Illinois, where he was farming for six years. In 1816 he moved to Caldwell County, Missouri, where he farmed two years. In 1880 he came to Daviess County, Missouri, where he purchased a farm and has since been living. In 1857, Mr. White was married to Miss Mary S. Cruise. They have six children: William S., Martin V., Mary T., James A., Eliza and...

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Biography of Jesse White

A widely known and universally esteemed citizen of Riley County, a retired farmer living in great comfort in the pleasant Town of Riley, is Jesse White, an honored veteran of the Civil war. For almost sixty years his home had been in the Sunflower State and he had done his part in aiding in its agricultural, religious and educational progrees. He was born July 10, 1844, in Jackson County, Indiana. His parents were Jesse and Naney (Kinlon) White. From their native state, North Carolina, the parents of Jesse White removed to Indiaua in 1842, and thence to Kansas, arriving at Manhattan, May 14, 1857. They settled on Mill Creek, fifteen miles northwest of Manhattan, and on the farm then chosen spent the remainder of their days, the father dying in 1861, when aged sixty years, and the mother passing away in 1864, at the age of fifty-three years. Farming was the father’s occupation. He was an anti-slavery man but was a Jacksonian democrat. Both he and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. They were good, virtuous, worthy people; none better ever came to Riley County. To them were born children as follows: David R., who is deceased; Richard F., who died in Indiana; Ellen E. and Sarah A. are both deceased; Nehemiah, who died while a soldier in the Union army, a member of Company G, Eleventh...

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