Surname: White

Biography of Curtis White

Curtis White, a retired carpenter of Concord, was born at Bow, N.H., April 4, 1861, son of Daniel White, of that place. The grandfather, Isaac White, who was an early settler of Bow, went there from Pembroke, and converted a grant of land into a good farm home for himself and his family. Daniel, the youngest son, was a blacksmith and stone worker. He purchased a farm opposite his father’s, and there carried on stone work as well as some farming. His death occurred March 16, 1825, after a lingering and painful illness, in the course of which he was obliged to undergo several and painful surgical operations. He married Mary Carter, daughter of Moses Carter, of the old Concord family of that name. They had three children besides Curtis. William, the eldest, died in October, 1826. Their daughter, Mary Ann, is also deceased; and the second son, Daniel C., is a practising dentist in Alton, Ill. Curtis White, who was the second-born of his parents’ children, followed various lines of business throughout his active period. After leaving the district school, he worked at farming for a time. He also did some black-smithing and carpentry, and for a while he was employed in a saw and grist mill. For many years Mr. White was a carpenter in Concord, and for about ten years he was engaged in carriage-building in...

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Biographical Sketch of George White

George White, the well known implement dealer and auctioneer of Newman, was born near Glasgow, Barren County, Kentucky, August 18, 1842, and is a son of M. L. and Mary (Biby) White. Middleton White was born in Barren County, Kentucky and moved to Edgar County, Illinois, where he was married. His wife was also from near Glasgow. Kentucky. ‘They are both dead and buried in the Paris cemetery. George White came to Newman and located in business in about 1874, since which time his business has steadily grown until he is known as one of the most successful and extensive implement dealers in the entire County. He also handles the Mitchell wagon and several makes of buggies and carriages. His sales run from $25,000 to $35,000 annually. In 1844 Mr. White was united in marriage to Miss Della Clark, who is a native of Kentucky. They have two children: Henry W., who will graduate from the Chicago Homeopathic School of Medicine in March, 1901, and Fred, who is in business with his father. George White has here held the office of township supervisor and while he resided in Edgar County held the same office. In 1861 he volunteered in Company E, Twelfth Illinois Infantry and served through the entire Civil war. During the month of February especially his services are in great demand as a public auctioneer. He is...

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Biography of Sulvanas J. White

SULVANAS J. WHITE is a well known resident of Union county, near the town of Lagrande, having been identified with the industrial life of that city for some time and having also operated in the mercantile business here, being attended with success and also manifesting his characteristic ability and integrity during his residence here, while also he is one of the pioneers of the northwest, as his father was also, and has wrought for many years in the development and for the progress of this and adjoining states. Charles F. and Elizabeth (Buchanan) White are the parents of our subject, who was born to them in Stark county, Illinois, on January 6, 1846. It was in 1851 that the parents determined to try their fortunes in the west, and accordingly fitted out the requisite conveyances and ox teams and started on the long and dreary journey across barren plain and rugged mountains infested with dangers of savages and wild beasts, besides the lurking disease that was then sweeping across the country. In due time they landed in Portland, having lost some from the train by accident and one by the Indians. The savages charged toll for crossing the streams, and had the train not been large doubtless would have massacred them all. Captain Dray piloted them in safety to their destination, and after one winter spent there the father...

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Biographical Sketch of Esquire William White

Esquire William White settled in Montgomery County in 1836. He is a brother of Benjamin White, who lives near Danville. He married Anna Fletchrall, of Maryland, and their children were John, Daniel, Ann, William, Benjamin, Stephen, Mary, Dorcas, and Elizabeth. Elizabeth, a sister of William White, Sr., married William Smith and settled near...

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Biographical Sketch of Benjamin White, Sr.

Benjamin White, Sr., was a native of Wales. He married Elizabeth Smith, and their son Benjamin, Jr., married Rebecca Chesell. They all lived in Montgomery Co., Md. Benjamin, a son of Benjamin White, Jr., was born November 4, 1796. He was married in 1821 to Rebecca Darby, who died, and in 1831 he married Lucy Scott. In 1837 they came to Missouri and settled in Montgomery County. Their children were Edward G., William H.., Richard G., Benjamin, Susan, Mary A., and Sarah E., all of whom are married and -living in’ Montgomery...

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Biographical Sketch of Matthew L. White

Matthew L. White was born and raised in Virginia, but removed to East Tennessee, from there to Alabama, and in 1829 he settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., and entered the land upon which the celebrated Pinnacle Rock stands. He married Rhoda Stagdon, and they had Nancy, William, Thomas S., James H., Isaac M., John R., Mary J., Rebecca, Samuel M., Margaret A., and Martha...

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Abstracts of Wills on File in the City of New York Surrogate’s Office 1660-1680

Abstracts of wills on file in the surrogate’s office city of New York 1660-1680. From May 1787 to the present, county surrogate’s courts have recorded probates. However, the court of probates and court of chancery handled estates of deceased persons who died in one county but who owned property in another. An 1823 law mandated that all probates come under the jurisdiction of the county surrogate’s courts. Each surrogate’s court has a comprehensive index to all probate records, including the unrecorded probate packets. Interestingly enough, there are wills existing and on record at the Surrogate’s Office in New York City for the time-span of 1660-1680. Genealogical extracts of these wills have been provided below.

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. L. C. White, Dr.

(See Ward). Nancy Louisa, daughter of Burges Gaither and Ann Eliza (Gunter) Chandler was born in Delaware District, July 30, 1884, and was educated in Willie Halsell College, Vinita. graduating in 1900. Married at Vinita, May 22, 1907, Dr. Lee Carl, son of Dr. George W. and Georgia A. (Adair) White, born December 25, 1873 in Warren County, Kentucky. He graduated from Kentucky University in 1905 and is an alumni of the Louisville University. He is a Mason and an Odd Fellow. They are the parents of Carl Chandler White, born March 9, 1919. Mrs. White is a member of the Methodist church and is a Rebecca. She is the youngest sister of Hon. T. A. Chandler, Congressman from the First District of Oklahoma. Dr. White enjoys a lucrative practice at...

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Biographical Sketch of Daniel White

Daniel White, son of Samuel White, was born near the city of Richmond, in Madison County, Kentucky, February 26, 1831. He remained in his birthplace until he was about twenty-one years of age, during which time he was engaged in farming and working for his father. After becoming of age he was engaged in farming for two years, and then worked in a mill three years. August 9, 1862, he was enrolled in Company F, Seventh Kentucky Cavalry, and was in the service during the war, being in several battles and skirmishes. After the war Mr. White moved to Tazewell County, Illinois, where for seven years he was engaged in farming. He then moved to Piatt County, Illinois, where he was farming for six years. In 1816 he moved to Caldwell County, Missouri, where he farmed two years. In 1880 he came to Daviess County, Missouri, where he purchased a farm and has since been living. In 1857, Mr. White was married to Miss Mary S. Cruise. They have six children: William S., Martin V., Mary T., James A., Eliza and...

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Biography of Jesse White

A widely known and universally esteemed citizen of Riley County, a retired farmer living in great comfort in the pleasant Town of Riley, is Jesse White, an honored veteran of the Civil war. For almost sixty years his home had been in the Sunflower State and he had done his part in aiding in its agricultural, religious and educational progrees. He was born July 10, 1844, in Jackson County, Indiana. His parents were Jesse and Naney (Kinlon) White. From their native state, North Carolina, the parents of Jesse White removed to Indiaua in 1842, and thence to Kansas, arriving at Manhattan, May 14, 1857. They settled on Mill Creek, fifteen miles northwest of Manhattan, and on the farm then chosen spent the remainder of their days, the father dying in 1861, when aged sixty years, and the mother passing away in 1864, at the age of fifty-three years. Farming was the father’s occupation. He was an anti-slavery man but was a Jacksonian democrat. Both he and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. They were good, virtuous, worthy people; none better ever came to Riley County. To them were born children as follows: David R., who is deceased; Richard F., who died in Indiana; Ellen E. and Sarah A. are both deceased; Nehemiah, who died while a soldier in the Union army, a member of Company G, Eleventh...

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Slave Narrative of Amelia Jones

Interviewer: Perry Larkey Person Interviewed: Amelia Jones Location: North London, Kentucky Place of Birth: Manchester, KY Age: 88 Concerning slaves of this section of the country, I will quote experiences and observation of an old negro lady who was a slave, Mrs. Amelia Jones, living in North London, Kentucky. “Aunt Amelia” as she is known around here is eighty-eight years of age, being sixteen years of age at the close of the Civil War. Mrs. Jones says, “I will tell as best I can remember, I was born eighty-eight years ago in Manchester, Ky. under a master by the name of Daw White. He was southern republican and was elected as congressman by that party from Manchester, Ky. He was the son of Hugh White, the original founder of Whitesberg, Ky. Master White was good to the slaves, he fed us well and had good places for us to sleep, and didn’t whip us only when it was necessary, but didn’t hesitate to sell any of his slaves, he said, “You all belong to me and if you don’t like it, I’ll put you in my pocket” meaning of course that he would sell that slave and put the money in his pocket. The day he was to sell the children from their mother he would tell that mother to go to some other place to do some work...

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Slave Narrative of Phillip Johnson

Interviewer: Guthrie Person Interviewed: Phillip Johnson Location: Poolesville, Maryland Ref: Phillip Johnson, R.F.D. Poolesville, Md. The subject of this sketch is a pure blooded Negro, whose kinky hair is now white, likewise his scraggy beard. He is of medium size and somewhat stooped with age, but still active enough to plant and tend a patch of corn and the chores about his little place at Sugarlands. His home is a small cabin with one or two rooms upstairs and three down, including the kitchen which is a leanto. The cabin is in great disrepair. Phillip John is above the average in intelligence, has some education and is quite well versed in the Holy Scriptures, having been for many years a Methodist preacher among his people. He uses fairly good English and freely talks in answer to questions. Without giving the questions put to him by this writer, his remarks given in the first person and as near his own idiom are as follows: “I’ll be ninety years old next December. I dunno the day. My Missis had the colored folks ages written in a book but it was destroyed when the Confederate soldiers came through. But she had a son born two or three months younger than me and she remember that I was born in December, 1847, but she had forgot the day of the month. “I was...

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Slave Narrative of Uncle Dave White

Interviewer: Samuel Addison Person Interviewed: Dave White Location: Congaree, South Carolina Date of Birth: (about) 1842 Age: 91 There Was No God But Mossa An’ Missus “My pa name was Nat White who tell me dat I was bo’n about 1842. My ma was name Jane White. My pa use to carry all de votes from McClellanville to Charleston. He come from Tibbin, South Carolina. He also been all ’round de United States. My Ma’s Ma bin name Kate. I had sense to know ’em all. “I know a heap o’ sojus had on nice buttons an’ had plumes in dere hats. Dey wus singin’ an’ playin’ on a flute dis song, ‘I wish I wus in Dixie,’ an’ dey went in de big house an’ broke up ebery thing. Dey say to me, ‘you are as free as a frog,’ an’ dey say to my pa, ‘all your chillun are free.’ Dey say ‘little niggers is free as a frog’ an’ we holler much. “I aint nebber do no work, but I kin ‘member I use to wear a pant you call chambery. Ma cook a pot o’ peas an’ weevils wus always on de top. Ma would den turn mush an’ clean a place on de floor, she make a paddle an’ we eat off de floor. She use to bake ash cake too. I didn’ know...

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Will of John White, – 1670

JOHN WHITE, Southampton, L. I. Leaves to only son John all houses and lands. “If he die without issue then to my daughter Elizabeth. If she die without issue then to my wife Hannah, for life, and then to the eldest son of my brother James White. If he die without issue then one half to my two nephews, John Topping and Thomas Topping. The other half to be divided amongst my four youngest sisters” [not named]. Wife to have use of property till son comes of age. Makes wife Hannah executrix, and “my loving friends, Francis and Daniel Sayre, and my brother-in-law, Thomas Topping” over-seers and guardian of children. Dated May 9, 1670. Witnesses, Thomas Cooper, Thomas Cooper, Jr. The execution of will was comfirmed May 30, 1670, before us, Henry Pierson, John Jessop, Richard Howell, Isaac Halsey. “Thomas Topping of Southampton, testifyes that the will is, and was, the very will of John White, deceased, and that hee, this deponent, wrote ye said will for him, and see him sign and seale ye same, as is also testifyed by ye other witnesses, July 1, 1670. Henry Pierson, Clerk of Court of Sessions.” Inventory taken by John Howell, Henry Pierson, Edward Howell, John Jennings. House and £50; allotment, £55. LIBER 1-2, page...

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Slave Narrative of Tena White

Interviewer: Martha S. Pickney Person Interviewed: Tena White Location: Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina Everybody in the town of Mt. Pleasant, Christ Church Parish (across the Bay from Charleston) knows “Tena White, the washer,” “Tena, the cook,” “Maum Tena” or “Da Tena, the nurse”—the same individual, accomplished in each art, but best as a nurse. The house where Tena lives is the second in a row of Negro houses. The writer, calling from the gate, was answered by Tena, a middle-sized woman of neat figure. As the writer ascended the steps a friendly cur wagged itself forward and was promptly reproved by Tena, who placed a chair, the seat of which she wiped carefully with her dress. The piazza was clean and on the floor a black baby slept on a folded cloth, with a pillow under its head. The writer was soon on friendly terms with Maum Tena, and was told: “As soon as my eye set on you, I see you favor the people I know. My people belonged to Mr. William Venning. The plantation was Remley Point. I couldn’t zactly member my pa’s name. I member when de war come though. Oh dem drum; I nebber hear such a drum in my life! De people like music; dey didn’t care nothing bout de Yankees, but dem bands of music! My mother name Molly Williams. My pa dead...

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