Surname: Ward

The family of Nelson Drake

The family of Nelson Drake; back to 1630, New York and Michigan pioneers, with genealogy supplement. Surnames: Allen, Barre, Bickford, Boyer, Bravender, Brosius, Brown, Christmas, Corner, Coey, Cozzi, Davis, Day, Diener, Drake, Dust, Engleberg, Fishel, Fookes, Gorton, Groce, Hawkins, Hewes, Hill, Hilton, Hirsch, Huddlestun, Kaiser, Kellogg, Langfield, Lear, Martinchak, McClellan, Point, Rae, Rayner, Ritter, Roehm, Rossi, Shilander, Smith, Soule, Stingley, Tucker, Ward, Wauvle, West, White, Wickham, and Wright.

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South Britain Connecticut Sketches and Records

This book contains much valuable genealogical data from local church records and cemeteries, and brief accounts of the following families : — Allen, Averill, Barnes, Bassett, Booth, Bradley, Bray, Canfield, Downs, Edmonds, French, Gilbert, Guthrie, Hann, Hayes, Hendryx, Hill, Mitchell, Pierce, Piatt, Post, Russell, Skeels, Stoddard, Tuttle, Wagner, Wakeley, Ward and Warner.

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Descendants of Lucius Reed, of Abington, Massachusetts

Lucius Reed, of Abington, Mass., was a descendant of (I) William Reade, who came to this country in the vessel “Assurance de Lo” in 1635, fifteen years after the arrival of the “Mayflower,” and settled in Weymouth, Mass. The line is through his son William Reed, who married Esther Thompson, of Middleboro, whose mother was Mary Cooke, daughter of Francis Cooke, who landed in 1620, from the “Mayflower.”

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A Genealogy of the Lake Family

A genealogy of the Lake family of Great Egg Harbour in Old Gloucester County in New Jersey : descended from John Lade of Gravesend, Long Island; with notes on the Gravesend and Staten Island branches of the family. This volume of nearly 400 pages includes a coat-of-arms in colors, two charts, and nearly fifty full page illustrations – portraits, old homes, samplers, etc. The coat-of-arms shown in the frontspiece is an unusually good example of the heraldic art!

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History of the township and village of Mazomanie, Wisconsin

The manuscript, History of the township and village of Mazomanie [Wisconsin] penned by William Kittle and published in 1900 collected information from a wide variety of sources, both documents, and living interviews. This book provides a general history of the township, and then presents a series of brief biographical sketches on the early settlers of Mazomanie. The links below will take you to the start of each historical section as detailed in the contents for the book, and then the specific pages of the book where each biographical sketch is contained. There is no index for the book, nor is there a list of biographical sketches contained within. We have taken the liberty of creating a biographical index for it.

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Descendants of William Brett of Bridgewater, MA

Ellis Brett, president of the Plymouth County Trust Company, of Brockton, and one of that city’s honored and respected citizens, is a worthy representative of historic New England ancestry, the Brett family having resided in this community since the first settlement of the mother town of Bridgewater, from which the town of North Bridgewater (now Brockton) was set off. Mr. Brett was born in the latter town Oct. 23, 1840, only son of Ephraim and Ruth (Copeland) Brett. The early history of the Brett family in America begins with William Brett, who came to Duxbury, Mass., in 1645, from Kent, England, and later became one of the fifty-four original proprietors and first settlers of the town of ancient Bridgewater, settling in the West parish of the town. He was an elder in the church, and often when the Rev. James Keith, the first ordained pastor of the church there, was ill, Mr. Brett preached to the people. He was a leading man in both church and town affairs, and was deputy to the General Court from the date of the in-corporation of ancient Bridgewater in 1656 to 1661. That he was well educated and intelligent is manifest from a letter to Governor Winslow, still extant, and he was much esteemed by his brethren and often employed in their secular affairs. He died Dec. 17, 1681, aged sixty-three years

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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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Expeditions of Fowler and James to Santa Fe, 1821

When Pike returned from his western expedition and related his experiences in Santa Fe and other places among the Spaniards, his accounts excited great interest in the east, which resulted in further exploits. In 1812, an expedition was undertaken by Robert McKnight, James Baird, Samuel Chambers, Peter Baum, Benjamin Shrive, Alfred Allen, Michael McDonald, William Mines, and Thomas Cook, all citizens of Missouri Territory; they were arrested by the Spaniards, charged with being in Spanish territory without a passport, and thrown into the calabazos of Chihuahua, where they were kept for nine years. In 1821, two of them escaped, and coming down Canadian and Arkansas rivers met Hugh Glenn, owner of a trading house at the mouth of the Verdigris, and told him of the wonders of Santa Fe. Inspired by the accounts of these travelers, Glenn engaged in an enterprise with Major Jacob Fowler and Captain Pryor for an expedition from the Verdigris to Santa Fe.

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Bolton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Bolton Massachusetts.

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Indians in Mason County Michigan 1880 Census

These 355 people were identified as Indians (I) in column 4 (color) of the 1880 census for Mason County Michigan. In order to have been enumerated they are believed to either have renounced tribal rule, and under state law, exercised their rights as citizens; or because they “mingled” with the white population of these Michigan towns were enumerated under the expanded definitions.

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