Surname: Vincent

Allen Genealogy of New Bedford Massachusetts

The Allen family of New Bedford Massachusetts is descended from George Allen who’s children and descendants would eventually settle in Old Dartmouth and New Bedford Massachusetts. This is an extensive genealogy of five sons of the fourteen children of James Allen and Sarah Howland of New Bedford MA, including the ancestry of James Allen back to George Allen.

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Pierce Family of North Bridgewater, MA

The Pierce families of this country are and have long been very numerous. Early in the settlement of New England came representatives from England, most of them not related, so far as now known. Among them were Abraham, of Plymouth, 1623, who became one of the original purchasers of Bridgewater in 1645; Daniel, of Newbury, blacksmith, who came from Ipswich, County of Suffolk, in 1634, aged twenty-three years; John, of Dorchester, mariner from Stepney, Middlesex, before 1631; another John, of Dorchester and Boston; John, of Watertown, 1638; Capt. Michael, of Hingham and Scituate; Richard, of Portsmouth, R. I.; Robert, of Dorchester; Thomas, of Charlestown, who was admitted to the church there in 1634; and Capt. William, of Boston, who was a distinguished shipmaster of his time.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Muster Roll of Captain James Clark’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain James Clark’s Company of Light Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service “by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twentieth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Bangor, Maine, to the eleventh day of May, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Seneca County New York Biographies

In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and linked each edition to the PDF file. Once you’ve found the biography you...

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Cushman Family of Norwich Vermont

The Cushman family in New England dates from the year 1621, the first after the landing of the Pilgrims from the Mayflower, when Robert Cushman, who was a prominent leader and organizer of the Plymouth Colony, brought from England the earliest recruits and supplies to the wasted and famishing settlement. A century and a half later Solomon Cushman, a descendant of Robert, in the sixth generation, born at Plympton, Mass., in 1745, having married Sarah Curtis, daughter of Simeon Curtis, at Lebanon, Conn., in 1768, removed to Norwich, probably in company with the Curtis family. Solomon Cushman (afterward known as Captain Solomon) was in those days a famous hunter and marksman, the terror of bears and catamounts. He once shot and killed a deer at a distance of seventy-two rods 11166 feet. In the war of the Revolution he served three years as lieutenant in the Norwich militia in the campaign of 1777 against Burgoyne, and the following two years on the northern frontier as captain of a company of Rangers in the regiment of Colonel Timothy Bedel of Haverhill, N. H. His health was much broken as a result of his service in the army. In 1784 he removed to Tunbridge, Vt., where he died in 1799, at the age of fifty-four. His son, Benjamin H. Cushman, born in Norwich, recently died at Tunbridge, upwards of ninety years...

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Massacre at Howard’s Well and Other Depredations – Indian Wars

Closely following the outbreak of the┬áCherokees and half -breed renegades at Whitemore‘s, Barren Fork, came on attack by a similar party of Indians, half breeds, and Mexicans combined, on a train of supplies, en route to Fort Stockton, at Howard’s Well, near old Fort Lancaster. The facts of this one of the most inhuman massacres in history were reported to the “War Department, by Col. Merritt, through General Angua, under date of April 29th, 1872. We give the report as written: On the 20th inst, I arrived with the cavalry of my command at Howard’s Well, a few hours too late to prevent one of the most horrible massacres that has ever been perpetrated on this frontier. A Mexican train, loaded with United States commissary and ordinance stores, on its way from San Antonio to Fort Stockton, was attacked by Indians, plundered and burned. All the people with the train, seventeen souls in all, were killed or wounded, except one woman. My command buried eleven bodies, and brought three wounded men and one woman into this post. Before arriving at the burning train, the first intimation we had of the horrible disaster were the charred and blackened corpses of some of the poor victims, but no one was alive to tell the horrors of the affair. I supposed, up to this time, that Capt. Sheridan, with the infantry of...

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Biography of Joseph K. Vincent

More than thirty-seven years have passed since Judge Vincent arrived in Idaho, and he is justly numbered among her honored pioneers and leading citizens. He has been prominently identified with her business life, being connected with mining, agricultural and commercial interests, and although he has rounded the psalmist’s span of three-score years and ten, and although the snows of many winters have whitened his hair, he has the vigor of a much younger man, and in spirit and interest seems yet in his prime. Old age is not necessarily a synonym of weakness or inactivity. It needs not suggest, as a matter of course, want of occupation or helplessness. There is an old age that is a benediction to all- that comes in contact with it, that gives out of its rich stores of learning and experience, and which, in its active connection with the affairs of life, puts to shame many a younger man, who grows weary of the cares and struggles and would fain shift to other shoulders the burdens which he should carry. Of such an honored type Judge Vincent, now in the evening of life, is a representative. A native of New England, he was born in Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, June 26, 1822, and is of Welsh and English ancestors, who were early settlers of Salem. His grandmother, his father and he himself were...

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Vincent , James Douglas – Obituary

Ukiah, Oregon James “Doug” Douglas Vincent, 73, of Ukiah, died April 7 in Gresham. At his request no services will be held. Burial was at the Ukiah Cemetery. Gresham Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements. Doug was born Oct. 17, 1934, to Cecil and Ruth (Dawson) Vincent in St. Louis. When Doug was 6, the family moved from Missouri to Tillamook where Doug was raised and educated. At 16, he purchased a log truck and moved to Eastern Oregon where he met and married the love of his life, Patsy Sheff, on Aug. 14, 1955. The couple had five children. Doug logged in Union, Wallowa and Umatilla counties. In 1964, they moved to Alaska where Doug owned and operated Specialized Truck Parts & Service. In 1984 Doug and Patsy moved back to Ukiah, where they opened and operated Dan’s Ukiah Service, a hunters’ travel stop. Doug bred and raised Healer dogs and rabbits. He loved the Ukiah valley and enjoyed caring for the local bird population and engaging in political discussions. Doug is survived by his wife of 52 years in Ukiah; three daughters, Dellena Levan of Wasilla, Alaska, Vonnie Ceja and Terrie Lockwood of Gresham; son, Daniel Vincent of Ukiah; sister, Rosemary Vincent of Boliver, Mo.; brother, John Vincent of Gresham; seven grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Doug was preceded in death by his son, Douglas Allen Vincent...

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Biographical Sketch of Ezekiel Vincent

Ezekiel Vincent, from Norwich, Vt., came to Morristown in 1843, and located upon the farm now owned by his adopted son, I. T. Vincent, on road 26, where he resided until his death, November 15, 1880, aged one hundred years, two months and eleven days. I. T. Vincent married Irene Haskell, by whom he had five children, two now living. For his second wife he married Caroline Green, who also bore him five children, two now living. His third wife, Adelia Foster, resides with him on the old...

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Biographical Sketch of Arthur S. Vincent

Arthur S., son of Charles B. and Maria (Bliven) Vincent, was born at Phelps, Ontario county, New York, December 20, 1862. He attended the public schools of Phelps, and the knowledge thus acquired prepared him for the activities of life. For a number of years he was very successfully engaged as a portrait artist, but at the present time is devoting his entire attention to the growing of fruit, having about two thousand fruit trees of different species, and is deriving there from a goodly income. He was elected a member of the village board of trustees, in which capacity he served three terms. He adheres to the tenets of the Presbyterian church, gives his political allegiance to the Republican party, and holds membership in the Phelps Business Men’s Club, of which he is secretary. having held that office since the club was organized. He is an exempt fireman, having been one of the charter members of the Redfield Hook & Ladder Company of Volunteer Firemen. Mr. Vincent married Mattie A.. daughter of Lyman A. and Eunice (Nearing) Baker, of Knowlesville, Orleans county, New York. Children: Elizabeth, Helen, Marie,,...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles B. Vincent

Charles B. Vincent, son of Benjamin Vincent, was born at Phelps, Ontario county, New York. After completing his studies in the common schools of the neighborhood, he served an apprenticeship at the trade of foundryman, and throughout his active career followed that occupation. He was a man of character and integrity, active in all that pertained to the welfare of the community, and won and retained the confidence of all with whom he was brought in contact. He married Maria Bliven. Their children were: Russell. deceased: Emma, deceased: Charles: Arthur S. (see elsewhere) ; Nellie: George,...

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