Surname: Vaughn

Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

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Descendants of John Washburn of Duxbury, MA

The Washburn name in this country is a distinguished one. Perhaps it is as yet only a tradition that John Washburn, the ancestor of the Washburns here considered, was he who first served as secretary of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Several governors of our States have borne the Washburn name and at one and the same time four of the name occupied seats in the United States Congress. And the branch of the Massachusetts Washburns seated in Middleboro and vicinity have borne no small part in the annals of the Old Colony and later Commonwealth. Capt. Amos Washburn was in command of a company in the American Revolution; one of his sons, a graduate of Harvard, was a talented lawyer at Middleboro; Edward Washburn, brother of Capt. Amos, was another patriot in the Continental army; and his son, Gen. Abiel Washburn, was one of the leading men of his time in Middleboro, the acknowledged leader of the Federal party, and for thirty-six years held commissions through the different grades of office in the State militia; while Luther, Cyrus and the late Bradford Sumner Washburn, in turn, were substantial citizens of the town, and the latter’s son, Judge Nathan Washburn, lawyer and present Justice of the Courts of Plymouth county, is giving a good account of himself.

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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1863 Settlers to Beaverhead County, Montana

William B. Carter, born in Ohio April 23, 1840. At the age of 223 years he came to Montana with a horse-team, and established himself on Alder Creek, freighting goods from Salt Lake for 4 or 5 years, in company with E. C. Bennett, who came with him from Ohio. Bennett died. Carter married Anna B. Selway in 1868, and settled at Dillon. Frederick Temple, born in Germany Aug. 14, 1840, came to America an infant and lived in Ohio and Missouri until 20 years of age, then went to Colorado, following the rush to Montana in 1863. Mined in Alder gulch and Prickly Pear Valley until 1866, when he went to Indian Creek. In 1867 he took a farm near Radersburg, and married Sorate Richards in 1874. Archie Macumber, born in New York Dec. 1, 1838, removed to Mich, when a boy, and resided there till 1859. Went from Colorado to New Mexico, and returning, went to the Salmon River mines. Made some valuable discoveries, and spent the winter of 1862 in Salt Lake, retuning to Virginia City in 1863, and going into freighting for two years, then selling groceries. Went to the Lemhi mines when they were discovered, and finally settled at merchandising, but sold out and secured a farm of 320 acres near Radersburg. In 1870 he married Mrs Martha Kennon. John Brady, Bowlder Valley, born...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles S. Vaughn

Charles S. Vaughn, editor, was born in Medina, Ohio, September 18, 1815. He received an academic education in his native town. In the spring of 1863 he joined Battery F, Fourteenth New York Artillery. Was in the army of the Potomac under Burnside. He was captured at the battle of Weldon Railroad, and confined as a prisoner of war for four months at Pemberton, Libby and Belleville prisons. He was recaptured at Fort Steadman, but was held only six days. After the war he engaged in the stock business in Wisconsin. In 1873 came West and homesteaded in Jewell County, and in August, 1881, in conjunction with his brother, established the Western Advocate at Omio, a small town and without railroad communication, but the paper in size and matter would seem to come from a large railroad city. They are deserving of great credit for their ably conducted...

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Biographical Sketch of S. F. Vaughn

S. F. Vaughn, brother of C. S. Vaughn, was born in Calumet County, Wis., in 1854. With a limited common school education, he commenced the printing business, an excellent school, at the age of fourteen. Established the Black Creek (Wis.) Journal in 1877, and the Northern Wisconsin News in 1879. Came West in August 1881, and with his brother established the Western Advocate at...

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Biography of George W. Vaughn

George W. Vaughn. Constructive enterprise in America had had its most notable triumphs in railroad building. In that field American ingenuity, indomitable energy and resourcefulness, have been displayed at their best. The history of railway building on this continent had many splendid names, and some of the greatest of them belong to Kansas. Not least among them was the late George W. Vaughn, or Major Vaughn, as he was more generally known, who died at Leavenworth February 3, 1916. He had a national reputation in engineering circles, and was a man, who, from the common walks of life, attained wide fame. He was born in Genesee County, New York, in the Town of Perry on November 24, 1829. It will not be inappropriate to recall the fact that at the time of his birth there was hardly a mile of railroad construction in the United States. His life spanned the entire period of railroad progress not only in America but practically in the world, since even in England Stephenson and his associates were only making experiments with locomotion by means of railroads. He was reared on a farm. His educational opportunities were confined to the public schools. This lack of schooling was more than equalized by an intellect of a superior order. He was particularly gifted in mechanics, not merely with the skilled operation in handling of tools, but...

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Vaughn, Freda Mae – Obituary

Union, Oregon Freda Mae Vaughn, 79, of Union, died July 14 at a local care home. A graveside service will be conducted at 2 p.m. Friday at the Union Cemetery. Mrs. Vaughn was born on Nov. 2, 1926, to Harry David and Ruth Irene Scott Fisher in Enterprise. The family moved to Union County when she was a child. On July 2, 1948, she married Guy Vaughn. She worked as a teller for First National Bank in Union for many years before she and her husband purchased Reuter’s Hardware Store in Union in 1966. They operated the store until they sold it in 1986. Mrs. Vaughn enjoyed nature and especially enjoyed bird watching and watching the wildlife in her yard. She was an avid sports fan and loved her dogs. She was an active member of the VFW Auxiliary. Survivors include her daughter-in-law, Connie Johnson of Stanfield; two grandchildren, a sister, Carlene Earley of Alaska, and other relatives. Her husband and a son, Kenneth D. Johnson, died earlier. Memorials may be made to the VFW in care of Daniels Chapel of the Valley, 1502 Seventh St. The Observer Online, Obituaries for the week ending July 22, 2006 – Published: July 27,...

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Biography of Armon P. Vaughn

Armon P. Vaughn. The condition and the high standards of the public schools of Rosedale reflect the power and efficiency of Armon P. Vaughn as an educator and an educational leader. Mr. Vaughn for the past four years had been city superintendent of schools there, and had two more years to serve in his present term. He came to Rosedale in 1907 and for four years was principal of the Columbian School and for two years was principal of the high school before his election to his present office. The enrollment in the public schools of Rosedale is 1,725 students, while the number of teachers is 48. Ten years ago when Mr. Vaughn first came in touch with educational conditions there were 26 teachers and an enrollment of 1,225. Though the schools are now much crowded the students are much better provided with educational facilities than they were ten years ago. There are more teachers to the number of pupils, and in many ways the standard of educational efficiency had been kept rising. Ten years ago there were only three teachers in the high school, while now the staff numbers nine. Manual training is an important feature of high school work, and in the manual training department are opportunities for learning the fundamentals of several mechanical trades, while the domestic science department fills an important need with the girl...

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Benjamin J. Vaughn Decisions Rendered

Office Of The Secretary Washington, D. C., April 1, 1905 Commission To The Five Civilized Tribes Muscogee, Ind. T. GENTLEMEN: On October 27 and 31, 1904, respectively, you transmitted the papers in the matter of the dismissal of the applications of Benjamin J. Vaughan for enrollment as a citizen by intermarriage, and for the enrollment of his children, Edward A., Grover Cleveland, and Oscar S. Vaughan as citizens by blood of the Chickasaw Nation. The principal applicant, Benjamin J. Vaughan, claims enrollment by intermarriage with Emily Burney, a recognized citizen by blood of said nation. The other applicants herein are the children of this marriage. It is claimed on behalf of all the applicants that their names are borne upon the rolls of the Chickasaw Nation. That this is true so far as the names of the children of Benjamin J. Vaughan are concerned is seen from your report of October 11, 1904, relative to certain persons whose names appear upon the tribal rolls of the Choctaw and Chickasaw nations, concerning whom your Commission and the United States courts exercised jurisdiction under the act of Congress approved June 10, 1896 (29 Stat, 321). On September 20, 1904, you dismissed the application of Benjamin J. Vaughan from your records, and on September 23, 1904, you took like action concerning the other applications, deeming your Commission without jurisdiction as to any...

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Biographical Sketch of Albert B. Vaughn

ALBERT B. VAUGHN. – This leading man of the younger generation of our state was born at Cottage Grove, Lane county, August 16, 1857, his father, J.W. Vaughn, being the proprietor of a mill located there. Our subject remained with his father until he was twenty-one years of age, receiving a common-school education. In 1878 he removed to Rock creek, and three years later came to Arlington, Oregon, and has made that flourishing town his home until the present time, conducting a remunerative business. In 1889 he was elected a member of the city council, and occupies that position to the present time. he is a man of growing influence, and one held in great esteem by all who know...

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