Surname: Vann

Biographical Sketch of D. W. Vann

(See Downing)-Daniel Webster, son of James and Elizabeth (Heaton) Vann was born October 12, 1845 in Cherokee Nation. Enlisted in Company M First Cherokee Mounted Volunteers, Confederate service July 12, 1862 and on reorganization in 1863 he joined company C the First Cherokee Mounted Rifles in which he served until the end of the war. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now He married Nancy Jane Riley, born Nov. 27, 1847. She died soon after their marriage and he married October 6, 1870 Clarinda Vann Rowe, born January 16, 1851. She died July 28, 1903. They were the parents of: Joseph Rowe, born June 1, 1871 and died April 13, 1890; Ada Archer born December 7, 1879 married Thomas Jackson McPherson, David Webster born January 24, 1883 married Mary Beatrice Alberty; Clarinda Alice born January 24, 1886 and William Claude Vann born August 23, 1888. Daniel Webster Vann was elected Councilor from Cooweescoowee District August 1, 1885 August 5, 1887 and August 5, 1895. His life has...

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Slave Narrative of Johnson Thompson

Person Interviewed: Johnson Thompson Place of Birth: Texas Date of Birth: December 1853 Just about two weeks before the coming of Christmas Day in 1853, I was born on a plantation somewheres eight miles east of Bellview, Rusk County, Texas. One year later my sister Phyllis was born on the same place and we been together pretty much of the time ever since, and I reckon there’s only one thing that could separate us slave born children. Mammy and pappy belong to W.P. Thompson, mixed-blood Cherokee Indian, but before that pappy had been owned by three different masters; one was the rich Joe Vann who lived down at Webber Falls and another was Chief Lowery of the Cherokees. I had a brother named Harry who belonged to the Vann family at Tahlequah. There was a sister named Patsy; she died at Wagoner, Oklahoma. My mother was born ‘way back in the hills of the old Flint District of the Cherokee Nation; just about where Scraper, Okla., is now. My parents are both dead now seems like fifty, maybe sixty year ago. Mammy died in Texas, and when we left Rusk County after the Civil War, pappy took us children to the graveyard. We patted her grave and kissed the ground,telling her good-bye. Pappy is buried in the church yard on Four Mile branch. I don’t remember much about my...

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Slave Narrative of Lucinda Vann

Place of Birth: Webbers Falls, Oklahoma Age: 92-100+ Yes, Sa. My name’s Lucinda Vann, I’ve been married twice but, that don’t make no difference. Indians wouldn’t allow their slaves to take their husband’s name. Oh, Lord, no. I don’t know how old I is; some folks say I’se ninety-two and some say I must be a hundred. I’se born across the river in the plantation of old Jim Vann in Webbers Falls, I’se born right in my marster and missus bed. Yes I was. You see, I’se one of them sudden cases. My mother, Betsy Vann, worked in the big house for the missus. She was weavin’ when the case came up so quick, missus Jennie put her on her own bed and took care of her. Master Jim and Missus Jennie was good to their slaves. Yes, Lord, yes. My missus name was Doublehead before she married Jim Vann. They was Cherokee Indians. They had a big, big plantation down by the river and they was rich. Had sacks and sacks of money. There was five hundred slaves on that plantation and nobody ever lacked for nothin’. Everybody had fine clothes, everybody had plenty to eat. Lord, yes, suer. Now I’se just old forgotten woman. Sometimes if I eat my bread this mornin’ none this evenin’. Seneca Chism was my father. He was a slave on the Chism...

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Slave Narrative of Harriett Robinson

Person Interviewed: Harriet Robinson Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Bastrop, Texas Date of Birth: September 1, 1842 Age: 95 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph Vann bought him, so he never did learn to talk much Cherokee. My mammy was a Cherokee slave, and talked it good. My husband was a Cherokee born Negro, too, and when he got mad he forgit all the English he knowed. Old Master Joe had a mighty big farm and several families of Negroes, and he was a powerful rich man. Pappy’s name was Kalet Vann, and mammy’s name was Sally. My brothers was name Sone and Frank. I had one brother and one sister sold when I was little and I don’t remember the names. My other sisters was Polly, Ruth and Liddie. I had to work in the kitchen when I was a gal, and they was ten or twelve children smaller than me for me...

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Slave Narrative of Betty Robertson

Person Interviewed: Betty Robertson Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Age: 93 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph Vann bought him, so he never did learn to talk much Cherokee. My mammy was a Cherokee slave, and talked it good. My husband was a Cherokee born Negro, too, and when he got mad he forgit all the English he knowed. Old Master Joe had a mighty big farm and several families of Negroes, and he was a powerful rich man. Pappy’s name was Kalet Vann, and mammy’s name was Sally. My brothers was name Sone and Frank. I had one brother and one sister sold when I was little and I don’t remember the names. My other sisters was Polly, Ruth and Liddie. I had to work in the kitchen when I was a gal, and they was ten or twelve children smaller than me for me to look after, too. Sometime Young Master Joe and the other...

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Slave Narrative of Phyllis Petite

Person Interviewed: Phyllis Petite Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Rusk County, Texas Age: 83 I was born in Rusk County, Texas, on a plantation about eight miles east of Belleview. There wasn’t no town where I was born, but they had a church. My mammy and pappy belonged to a part Cherokee named W. P. Thompson when I was born. He had kinfolks in the Cherokee Nation, and we all moved up here to a place on Fourteen-Mile Creek close to where Hulbert now is. ‘way before I was big enough to remember anything. Then, so I been told, old master Thompson sell my pappy and mammy and one of my baby brothers and me back to one of his neighbors in Texas name of John Harnage. Mammy’s name was Letitia Thompson and pappy’s was Riley Thompson. My little brother was named Johnson Thompson, but I had another brother sold to a Vann and he always call hisself Harry Vann. His Cherokee master lived on the Arkansas river close to Webber’s Falls and I never did know him until we was both grown. My only sister was Patsy and she was borned after slavery and died at Wagoner, Oklahoma. I can just remember when Master John Harnage took us to Texas. We went in a covered wagon with oxen and camped out all along the way. Mammy...

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Biography of Charles E. Vann

Charles E. Vann, one of the well known residents of Muskogee county, living at Webbers Falls, has long been identified with farming interests in this section of the state. He is a native son of Oklahoma, his birth having occurred near Preston, Texas, in Chickasaw Nation, on the 12th of November, 1863. He is a son of John S. and Elizabeth (Fields) Vann, both of whom were members of the Cherokee Nation. They had a family of five children, but Charles E. is the only one now living. In what is now Muskogee county Charles E. Vann spent the period of his boyhood and, youth and acquired his education in the schools of the locality and the Cherokee Male Seminary. After attaining his majority he turned his attention to farming and stock raising and through the intervening period has devoted his attention to agricultural interests. His labors’ have been wisely and carefully directed, and his industry and perseverance have brought to him a substantial measure of success. He is today the owner of two hundred and ten acres of rich and well improved land. He has brought his farm under a high state of cultivation and supplied it with all, modern equipment and accessories. In 1891 Mr. Vann was united in marriage to Miss Ada Raymond, who was born and reared in Muskogee county, and they have become parents...

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Brantley S. Vann

F. A., Btry. E, 9th Regt. Born in Cumberland County June 17, 1896; son of J. R. and Ida L. Vann. Entered the service at Fayetteville, N.C., July 28, 1918, and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., transferred to Camp Hill, Va. Mustered out of the service at Camp Jackson, S. C., June 28,...

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Junius Richardson Vann, Jr.

Capt., Med. Corps, 160th Inf., 40th Div. Born in Cumberland County Sept. 9, 1889; son of J. R. and Ida L. Vann. Entered the service at Fayetteville, N.C., July, 1917, and sent to Camp Greenleaf, Ga., and transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 11, 1918. Promoted to the rank of Lt. August, 1917, and to Capt. March 12, 1918. Landed in the USA July 29, 1919, and mustered out of the service at Camp Lee, Va., Aug. 15,...

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Walter Albert Vann

1st Class Private, Co. C, 83rd Div., 331st Inf.; of Duplin County; son of J. T. and Mrs. K. J. Vann. Entered service May 26, 1918, at Warsaw, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, transferred to Camp Wadsworth, then to Newport News, Va. Sailed for France Sept. 23, 1918. Returned to USA March 8, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson March 29,...

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Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of...

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