Surname: Tyner

Biographical Sketch of Aaron Tyner

(See Carter)-James Fields, son of Lewis and Sallie (Parris) Tyner, married Quatie Charley and they were the parents of Delilah, born June 3, 1883; Aaron, born December 22, 1886; James, born March 26, 1888; Ralph, born February 19, 1891 and Minnie Christine Tyner. Aaron Tyner was educated in the Male Seminary. He married Susie Fields. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows fraternity and is a substantial farmer near Sperry. Lewis Tyner was born in 1837. Married Sallie, daughter of Moses and Mary (Langley) Parris, born in 1883. She died March 15, 1868 and he died October 10, 1894. They were the parents of James Fields...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas J. Tyner

(See Tyner)-Thomas Jefferson son of Carter Blackstone and Esther Jane (Piblow) Tyner was born March 1, 1878. Educated in the Cherokee Public Schools and Friends Mission at Skiatook. Married April 27, 1914 Carrie, daughter of Geo. W. Willits and Rachel (Connor) Willits born Dec. 23, 1883 in Wise County,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. George M. Tyner

(See Sanders) Nancy, daughter of George O. Saunders and Jennie Tail married Jefferson Tyner and their son George Marion Tyner was born April 10, 1883. Graduated from Male Seminary May 29, 1907. Married at Vinita June 16, 1916 Ethel, daughter of John Pleasant and Martha J. Marshall, born March 5, 1889 in Texas. They are the parents of George Marion Tyner, Jr. born August 24, 1917. Mr. and Mrs. Tyner are members of the Methodist Church. They taught school several years before their...

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Biography of Carter B. Tyner, Sr.

Carter B. Tyner, Sr., is a native son of Oklahoma and a representative in both the paternal and maternal lines of honored pioneer families of the state. He has reached the age of sixty-six years and is now living largely retired upon his ranch near Skiatook after many years of active connection with farming and stock raising interests of Washington county. He was born on Fourteen-Mile creek, near Tahlequah, October 17, 1855, his parents being Lewis C. and Sarah (Parris) Tuner, of Cherokee extraction, and natives of Indian Territory. During the Civil war the father took his family to the Choctaw Nation and served in that conflict as a soldier in the Confederate army. After the close, of hostilities he returned to his farm near Skiatook, in Washington county, and this he continued to operate until his demise in 1896. For many years he had survived the mother, who passed away in 1868. Her father, Moses Parris, was a man of high intellectual attainments and he assisted in framing the constitution of the Cherokee Nation. His death occurred in 1863. To Mr. and Mrs. Tyner were born seven children: Moses, Melisa, James F., Mary E., Bud, Sadie and Carter B. Mr. Tyner resides upon the old family homestead, situated in Washington county, six miles north of Skiatook, near the Osage county line, of which his father became the owner...

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Biography of William S. Tyner

William S. Tyner was one of the early settlers of Kansas, though he lived in the state only a few years, but founded a family which had become especially well known and prominent in Osage County. The Tyners were an old and prominent family of Indiana. William S. Tyner was one of seven sons and was born on a farm in Rush County, Indiana, September 20, 1820. His parents were John and Nancy (Sailors) Tyner, both Indiana people. William S. Tyner was a consin of James N. Tyner, who served as postmaster-general under President Hayes. The early education of William S. Tyner was acquired in the district school of Rush County. When he was nineteen years of age his family removed to Wabash County in that state. In 1842 William Hyner married Mary Washburn of Indiana. Six children were born to their union: Milton, deceased; Helen, Mrs. Hiza Wilson of Michigan Valley, Kansas; Jonas of California; Willis H. of Lyndon; Arminda, who lives on the old homestead in Indiana; Edgar, deceased; and Melvin of Arcadia, Tennessee. The Indiana home of William S. Tyner for many years was a 160-acre farm. There he and his wife reared their family. In 1869 he followed two of his older sons, Milton and Jonas, to Kansas, located on a farm of a quarter section in Douglas County. In Douglas County he became prominent...

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Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of...

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