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Surname: Tracey

History of the Industries of Norwich VT

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Although the products of the industries in Norwich have not been of great magnitude they have been quite varied in character. Such information in regard to these callings as we have been able to obtain we will present to our readers, though not in strict chronological order. Among the earliest establishments coming under this head was a grist mill established as early as 1770, by Hatch and Babcock on Blood Brook, on or near the site of the grist mill now operated by J. E. Willard,...

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Postmasters and Postal Service in Norwich Vermont

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now It was fifteen years after the admission of Vermont into the Federal Union, and forty years after the settlement of the town, before Norwich had a post office. The first post office was established at Norwich Plain, July 1, 1805, and Jacob Burton was appointed postmaster. Postmaster Burton kept the office in his harness shop on the main street of the village, nearly opposite the present residence of Mrs. William E. Lewis. Probably the duties of the office were not so great as to interfere much...

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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic;...

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Biography of Charles Tracey

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now CHARLES TRACEY A REPRESENTATIVE Albanian whose sterling qualities of the head and heart have brought him into popular favor, and who has already been honored by the bestowal of responsible political positions, is the Hon. Charles Tracey, our present congressman from this district. He is descended from a long and influential line of Irish ancestry. Born at No. 757 Broadway, Albany, on the 27th of May, 1847, he has thus passed his forty-third year, and is in the vigor of manhood, possessing the capabilities of performing efficiently the active and onerous duties of life. In 1838 his father, John Tracey, removed to this country from Canada, in consequence of the native rebellion then existing in that country. He lived in Albany till his death on the 12th of July, 1875. He was a man of high character, having served as a trustee in many local organizations, both financial and charitable; was once a candidate for state senator; was a most respected and excellent citizen, and his departure was deeply and widely regretted by his fellow-citizens. His wife, Maria Tracey, survived him five years, dying in 1880. The benevolent and charitable disposition of Mr. and Mrs. John Tracey will long be remembered by the citizens of Albany. Charles Tracey, the subject of our present sketch, was sent...

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