Surname: Todd

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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The Settlers of Narraguagus Valley Maine

A glance at the map of the western part of Washington County will show that any treatment of the early settlement upon the Narraguagus River, necessarily involves more or less of the histories of Steuben, Milbridge, Harrington and Cherryfield. Steuben was formerly township “No. 4, East of Union River,” and No. 5 comprised the territory now included in the towns of Milbridge and Harrington. The town of Cherryfield is composed of No. 11, Middle Division, Brigham Purchase, and of the northeastern part of what was formerly Steuben. All that part of Cherryfield lying south of the mills on the...

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Genealogies of the First Settlers of Passaic Valley

Passaic Valley in New Jersey was first settled in the early 1700’s, primarily by families from Long Island, New York and Connecticut. The Family records, or, Genealogies of the first settlers of Passaic Valley and vicinity above Chatham provides genealogies of these early settlers from family records when they could be obtained, otherwise the author used family members to provide the information. Since some of the information comes from memory of individuals, one should validate what is written before relying on it to greatly.

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Dahlonega Georgia in 1848

Dahlonega, Georgia, April, 1848 The Cherokee word Dah-lon-e-ga signifies the place of yellow metal; and is now applied to a small hamlet at the foot of the Alleghany Mountains, in Lumpkin County, Georgia, which is reputed to be the wealthiest gold region in the United States. It is recorded of De Soto and his followers that, in the sixteenth century, they explored this entire Southern country in search of gold, and unquestionable evidences of their work have been discovered in various sections of the State. Among these testimonials may be mentioned the remains of an old furnace, and other works for mining, which have been brought to light by recent explorations. But the attention of our own people was first directed to this region while yet the Cherokees were in possession of the land, though the digging of gold was not made a regular business until after they had been politely banished by the General Government. As soon as the State of Georgia had become the rightful possessor of the soil (according to law), much contention and excitement arose among the people as to who should have the best opportunities for making fortunes; and, to settle all difficulties, it was decided by the State Legislature that the country should be surveyed and divided into lots of forty and one hundred and sixty acres, and distributed to the people by...

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Lincoln Township

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Ahrendsen, Herman. Wf. Annie; ch. Lawrence, Arthur, Alta. P. O. Manning, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 7; O. 80 ac., sec. 8. (9.) Aikman, Geo. R. Wf. Mae; ch. Ethel M. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 26. (38.) Aikman, R. F. Wf. Jennie; ch. Vera, Floyd, Olive, Donald and Myron. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 24. (34.) Asmus, Fred. Wf. Edith; ch. Dwight, Hazel and Harry. P. O. Audubon, R. 1....

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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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Todd Family Genealogy

This huge dataset depicts the descent from Christopher Todd (1637-1919), being an effort to give an account, as full as possible of his descendants in America.

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Biographical Sketch of Levi Todd

Levi Todd, born in Rindge, N. H., in 1797 or ’98, was educated in the common schools of his neighborhood, and came to Hinsdale when about twenty-one years of age. He was a shoemaker by trade, and built the first shoe shop in the town, and about six months after he came he married Nancy Corey. of Ashburnham, Mass. He followed his trade several years, then gave his attention to manufacturing brick, his brick-yard being the first in the town. He finally bought the farm now occupied by his son “alter C., where he found excellent clay beds. He continued to manufacture brick in all about twenty-five years, then he sold his brick-yard and gave his whole attention to farming. He died in 1873, aged seventy-six years. Mrs. Todd died in 1872, aged seventy-three years. They were the parents of six children, only two of whom are living-Nancy A. (Mrs. James Boyce), of Keene, and Walter C., as previously...

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Biographical Sketch of Hon. Caleb Todd

Hon. Caleb Todd, or “Esq.” Todd, as he was more familiarly known, was for many years one of the most prominent and influential citizens of Hinsdale. He was born in Wallingford, Conn., March 16, 1785, resided and did business in Cooperstown, N. Y.. a few years, taking up his abode in Hinsdale in 1815. Here he was one of the pioneer manufacturers, and was widely known as a manufacturer of woolens for a great number of years. At his death, May 21, 1871, he was the oldest citizen of Hinsdale. Mr. Todd was twice married and reared eight children, five of whom, with his second wife, survived him. Of these children, Henry Day, born November 8, 1809, was for twenty-five years connected with the Boston Custom House; John Douglass, born March 11. 1814, was for several years a successful woolen manufacturer at Hinsdale, of the firm of Haile & Todd; and Jehiel, born November 4, 1818, was also for many years interested in the manufacture of woolens, at Lowell, Mass., but subsequently became a wholesale dealer in spices, coffee, etc., at Worcester, Mass., where he now resides. “Esq° Todd was an active citizen, and filled all the principal offices in the gift of his townsmen, being several times returned to the legislature. He was an ardent lover of our country, strongly conservative, in early days a Whig, and later...

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Biographical Sketch of George C. Todd

Todd, George C.; railroad division supt.; born, Flushing, O., June 7, 1867; started as telegraph operator with the C. L. & W. Ry., in August, 1883; train dispatcher, October, 1887, to September, 1889; train dispatcher, Northern Pacific Ry., September, 1889, to Jan. 1, 1890; from that date to April, 1902, train dispatcher N. Y. S. & St. L. Ry.; chief train dispatcher, 1902 to 1907; chief dispatcher to April, 1908; train master to June, 1912; supt. telegraph to date; now division superintendent same...

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Jonathan Todd of Guilford CT

Jonathan Todd4, (Jonathan3, John2, Christopher1) born March 20, 1713; d. Feb. 24, 1791; married Jan. 9, 1735, Elizabeth, dau. of Capt. Samuel Couch, of Fairfield, Conn., who was born 1710, died Dec. 14, 1783. No children. Ordained pastor of the church in East Guilford, now Madison, Connecticut, Oct. 24, 1733, where he remained until his death in 1791, an exceptionally long pastorate of 58 years, all spent in one place. Graduated from Yale, 1732. “He was a distinguished scholar, and a judicious critic in the learned languages: had given considerable attention to philosophy, and had thoroughly studied history, both ancient and modern…..Assiduous in his application to reading, and preparations for the sanctuary, making the sacred oracles his guide, he fed his hearers with knowledge and understanding…Christ Jesus and him crucified was the sum and substance of his preaching. He had a happy talent at conversation. In times of uncommon sickness and mortality he devoted almost the whole of his time to visiting, and praying with the sick and dying, and administering consolation to the afflicted. A clear discernment and sound judgement made him an able counsellor. He was singularly mild and amiable in his disposition, clothed with humility and plainness. At his death, not one of the sacred order in the State had been of so long standing in it. Not one head of a family was then living,...

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Sybil Todd Wheeler

WHEELER, Sybil Todd5, (Daniel4, Daniel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born 1753, died May 11, 1777, married July 10, 1776, John, son of Capt. James and Sarah (Johnson) Wheeler who married second Nov. 19, 1777, Sarah Johnson, by whom he had (1) Elijah, b. 1778; (2) Samuel; (3) Sybil, b. 1783. Child: John Todd, b. May 4, 1777, d. 1868. His father soon removed to the West, and left him in the care of his grandparents in Derby, Conn. He settled in Seymour, Conn., where he became an enterprising merchant. He married in 1797, Sally Clark, of Woodbridge, (Conn.?), and had John Clark, b. 1799, d. Feb. 8, 1881. He m. Charlotte, daughter of Joel and Ruth (Stoddard) Chatfield, and sister to Oliver Stoddard Chatfield. He was a manufacturer of paper and augers; removed to New York City where he died. They had Henry, b. 1815, m. Nancy Hotchkiss of New Haven, Ct., who was b. 1819, had six children Frances, b. 1817, m. O. C. Putnam, of New York City, had four children Howard, b. 1819, d. 1828; (4) John, b. 1821, m. Alice Stanley, of New York City, where they afterward resided, they had four children Sarah, b. 1825, m. Charles E. Converse, and resided in New York City, they had three children Charlotte Mary Elizabeth, d. aged 2...

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