Surname: Taylor

Biography of Captain Oliver Hazard Perry Taylor

Oliver Hazard Perry Taylor was the youngest son of Commodore William Vigneron Taylor of the United States navy. He was born at Newport, Rhode Island, September 14th, 1825. He entered the Military Academy at West Point July 1st, 1842, before he had reached the age of seventeen, and graduated July 1st, 1846. On the day of his graduation he was appointed Brevet 2nd Lieutenant, First dragoons, but did not enter immediately upon his duties. The company to which he was assigned was serving in New Mexico against hostile Indians, and it was there he joined it on October 25th,...

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Taylor Brothers

John and Solomon Taylor, composing the term of Taylor Bros., who operate the Prairie City Roller Mills, are natives of that grand old commonwealth Ohio. The older brother, John, became a resident of the county in 1862, and for a number of years was engaged in mining on Canyon creek. In 1881, on the arrival of his brother they became engaged in farming three miles from Prairie City, and today have 640 acres under cultivation, all of it being highly improved. Their home being one of the nicest in the county. In 1891 they bought the mill property which is a complete up-to-date fifty barrel seven boater mill, with the necessary purifiers, scalper, scourer, smutted, etc. They have a fall of 21 feet in their waterpower and operate the year round. It has proven a most beneficial enterprise to the farmers near at hand, who are enabled to obtain a good price for their wheat with the advantage of a short haul, a saving to them of a good many dollars annually. A feature of their trade is a large exchange business with the farmers, exchanging for wheat its manufactured products. Their patronage has grown to such all extent that they have made arrangements to enlarge by adding an 18×30 three-story building. Mr. Sol. Taylor is at present one of the county...

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Letter from Col. Robert Love to Thomas Dillard Love – 27 July 1813

Waynesville (N.C.) July 27th, 1813. Dear Thomas: I have heard nothing from you latterly; What are your reasons for not writing more to me? I am at a loss to conjecture. The last account was by Robert Love(Who is he?-F.D. Love), and at that time you had scarcely recovered from your illness. Currency is given to a report which reached this place about two weeks ago; that Samuel had enlisted himself as a common soldier. Great God? what a delirium or delusion has his mind gotten into, if that is the case; for let a man’s patriotism or love of country, be what it may, he ought first to study his individual situation, for what benefits could our common Country derive from anything that he could do that would counter-balance against the evils which must inevitable flow from a separation from a helpless family, such as his is, independent of his inability as to bodily strength to undergo the fatigues of an army. Those are considerations which ought to enter into the minds of every person before he engages into the army. I cannot describe to you the astonishment is excited in my mind on hearing the report, & in fact, it has measurably rendered me unfit for any kind of business; for my mind is so strongly agitated that I cannot shake it off, or relieve my mind...

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Biographical Sketch of Richard L. Taylor

(Halfbreed and Ghigau)-Richard Lee, son of William and Elizabeth (Grimmett) Taylor was born in 1854. Married in 1880 Margaret Elminr Paden, born in 1856. They are the parents of: Nannie C. married Felix N. Holland; Annie Almira, married W. A. Corley; Mary Amelia, married Thomas E. Holland; Susie Bunch, married Claude Doherty; Richard Lee; William Benjamin, deceased, and Martha Catherine living, married Tiny Hill, deceased. Richard Lee Taylor was elected Sheriff of Flint District August 1, 1887; August 5, 1889 and August 1, 1893. Elected Senator from the same district August 3, 1903. Elected County Commissioner of Adair County November 3,...

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Biographical Sketch of James L. Taylor

(See Foreman)- James Lincoln Taylor, born on the Cherokee reservation in North Carolina September 7, 1860, educated locally. Married at Pryor April 21, 1895, Dora B. Carty, daughter of Charles and Marie Carty, born Feb. 21, 1872, in Benton County, Ark. They are the parents of: Nellie B., born Feb. 10, 1896, married C. F. Conner; Alice, born March 9, 1899, Marguerite, born Oct. 5, 1902, married L. N. Logsden; William, born August 1, 1905 and Charles Henry, born August 7, 1915. Mr. Taylor is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias. He was postmaster of Pryor from 1894 to 1898 and was elected Solicitor of Cooweescoowee District August 2, 1897. James Madison, son of David and Mary Ann (Bigby) Taylor married Addie Manchester and they were the parents of James Lincoln...

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Biographical Sketch of John M. Taylor

(See Foreman) –John Manchester, son of James Madison, born April 18, 1818, and died January 7, 1907, and Addle (Manchester) Taylor was born Aug. 14, 1860, in Cherokee County, North Carolina, and was educated in the Cumberland Presbyterian College, Louden, Tennessee, and at Atlanta, Georgia. Married at Claremore, Thursday, February 23, 1893, Bertha E. McCutchan, daughter of Samuel and Margaret McCutchan, born November 29, 1872, at Redoak, Charlotte County,Virginia and was educated in Missouri. They are the parents of Blaine Samuel, born June 25, 1894; Robert Clinton, born July 24, 1897; served during the World war in the Medical Corps; Florence Thelma, born August 17, 1902; McCutchan, born November 28, 1904; Oklahoma, born November 6, 1906, and John Manchester Taylor, born November 8, 1909. David Taylor, born December 16, 1791, to Orange County, Virginia, married Mary Ann Bigby, born August 9, 1802, and they were the parents of James Madison Taylor, who married Addie Manchester, a native of Providence, R.I. John Manchester Taylor, whose Cherokee name is Katahya, is a thirty-second degree Mason, Shriner and Elk. Attorney for the Cherokees, Creeks and Seminoles. Was U. S. Deputy Marshal for the Fort Smith Court for twenty-three years; Indian Police twelve years; Deputy Sheriff five years; Postal Inspector three years; Assistant Solicitor of Cooweescoowee District eight years; United States Commissioner 4 years and Master in...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Louisa J. Taylor

(See Foreman)-Louisa Jane, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Moon) Dinsmore, was born in Tenn. in 1863. Married in 1878, James Elbert, son of Thomas Jefferson and Martha Ann (Bradley) Taylor, born Sept. 10, 1855. He died in 1918. They were the parents of. Lenora May, born May 17, 1883, married Robert F. Auten; Dora Jessie, born November 17, 1884, married John Julian Buster; Samuel Cornelius, born December 25, 1886, married Beulah Wynatt; Clyde Elizabeth, born September 13, 1888, married Robert J. Rogers; Xenaphon Elbert, born February 13, 1890; Bertha Belle, born November 3, 1891; Emma Iola, born August 18, 1893, married Daniel Henry Bell; Walter A., born August 19, 1897; Mary Imo, born January 4, 1900, and Bernard Dinsmore Taylor, born March 3, 1904. Mary Ann, daughter of James and Catherine (Foreman) Bigby, was born August 9, 1802. Married David Taylor, born in Orange County, Virginia, December 16, 1791. They were the parents of Thomas Jefferson Taylor, who married Martha Ann...

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Thomas Dillard Love and Anna Taylor – Descendants

Thomas Dillard Love, son of Robert Love and Mary Ann Dillard, b. on Friday 6th, day of May 1785; m. Anna Taylor Daughter of General Nathaniel Taylor, of Carter County, East Tennessee, June 16th, 1812; d. in Carter County, East Tennessee, November 16th, 1832. The children of this marriage are as follows: Descendants 1) Nathaniel Taylor Love, B. Monday May 10th, 1813, at 12 o’clock in the day; d. Sunday 21st day of December 1823 at 10 o’clock in the night. 2) Robert Andrew Jackson Love, b. Monday 7th, March, 1815, at 11 o’clock in the night; d. Saturday 22nd, August 1818 at 9 o’clock in the morning. 3) James Patton Taylor Love, b. January 16th, 1817 on Thursday at daylight; d. Monday 4th, day of November 1833 at 9 o’clock in the morning. 4) Robert Love, b. April 25th, 1819; m. Sarah Mitalda Alexander, daughter of James Michell Alexander and Nancy(Foster) Alexander, of Buncombe County, North Carolina, May 25th, 1848; d. September 1st a.m., 1876, at Johnson City, Washington County, East Tennessee. 5) Mary Ann Love, B. Monday February 26th, 1821 at 11 o’clock at night; m. Robert Dulaney, and by him had one son-Alcaney Robert Dulaney, and died between 1835 and 1843, leaving this son, died a bachelor. 6) Lorina Elizabeth Love, b. July 13th, 1823 at 4 o’clock in the evening; d. April 23rd, 1838, age...

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Andrew Taylor – Descendants

Genealogy of the Taylor Family, taken from the old Taylor Family Bible, now in the possession of the only oldest surviving members, (William Carter Taylor & George Duffield Taylor) on Buffalo Creek, Carter County, East Tennessee. Andrew Taylor, b.______; m. Ann Wilson; d. 1787; and by her had several children, one of whom was Nathaniel Taylor, who was born on the 4th, day of February 1772, in Rockbridge County, Virginia. He married Marry Patton, daughter of James and Sarah Patton, of Rockbridge County, Virginia on November 15th, 1791. She was born in the same County on the 15th, day of November 1772. Nathaniel Taylor went from Carter County, East Tennessee on horse-back for his wife; married her and brought her back from Virginia behind him to the home of his Father, Andrew Taylor, on Buffalo Creek, near the confluence of Buffalo Creek and Powder Branch. The old HOME was located on a small eminence near the site of the Present Taylor Homestead. Only a few stones mark the site of the old HOME. Back of the old HOME, on the top of the hill a little to the South East, lies the Grave Yard where all the Taylors for the past two generations are buried, as well as a great many of the Loves. Nathaniel Taylor’s grave is covered with a large marble slab. ——-o—- Nathaniel Taylor and Mary...

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Alfred Wilson Taylor and Elizabeth Duffied – Descendants

Alfred Wilson Taylor and Elizabeth Duffield Descendants. 1) William Carter Taylor, b. 12th December Friday Night 15 minutes past Nine o’clock, 1823; died Saturday December 2nd 1905 at 5:30 p.m.; never married, (and is still living on the old Taylor Homestead, Buffalo Creek, Carter County, Tennessee). 2) Nathaniel Macon Taylor, b. Friday morning 23rd day of September 1825; m. Miss Mollie K. Jones of Richmond, Virginia, _________ and by her had several children (a) Hgh D. Taylor, b. 1870, d 1890; (b) Mary, who married Jack Winston and by him has three, Nathaniel Taylor Winston and Alfred Wilson Taylor. And another by the name of Jack Hasting Winston Jr. They live in Bristol, Tennessee, and Mr. Winston is a practicing lawyer (c) Jaunita Taylor, who married Bunting English. They live in Bristol also. (d) Elizabeth Taylor, who married Thomas Davis. They live in Bristol also. Nathaniel Macon Taylor died on Sunday 17th day of April 1898 at his home in Bristol, Tennessee. He leaves a widow, three daughters and three grandchildren. He was a very prominent lawyer. 3) George Duffield Taylor, B. Saturday Night the 23rd day of January 1829 15 minutes before three o’clock. “This man after the death of my Father became my guardian, and the guardian, and the guardian for all of the Father’s children and acted as such till, the youngest (myself) became of age....

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Slave Narrative of Victoria Taylor Thompson

Person Interviewed: Victoria Taylor Thompson Age: 80 My mother, Judy Taylor, named for her mistress, told me that I was born about three year before the war; that make me about 80 year old so they say down at the Indian Agency where my name is on the Cherokee rolls since all the land was give to the Indian families a long time ago. Father kept the name of ‘Doc’ Hayes, and my brother Coose was a Hayes too, but mother, Jude, Patsy, Bonaparte (Boney, we always called him), Lewis and me was always Taylors. Daddy was bought by the Taylors (Cherokee Indians); they made a trade for him with some hilly land, but he kept the name of Hayes even then. Like my mother, I was born on the Taylor place. They lived in Flint District, around the Caney settlement on Caney Creek. Lots of the Arkansas Cherokees settled around there long times before the Cherokees come here from the east, my mother said. The farm wasn’t very big, we was the only slaves on the place, and it was just a little ways from a hill everybody called Sugar Mountain, because it was covered with maple sugar trees, and an old Indian lived on the hillside, making maple sugar candy to sell and trade. Master Taylor’s house had three big rooms and a room for the loom,...

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Slave Narrative of Sarah H. Locke

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Sarah H. Locke Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Woodford County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1859 Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. SARAH H. LOCKE-DAUGHTER [of Wm. A. and Priscilla Taylor] Mrs. Locke, the daughter of Wm. A. and Priscilla Taylor, was born in Woodford County, Kentucky in 1859. She went over her early days with great interest. Jacob Keephart, her master, was very kind to his slaves, would never sell them to “nigger traders.” His family was very large, so they bought and sold their slaves within the families and neighbors. Mrs. Locke’s father, brothers, and grandmother belonged to the same master in Henry County, Kentucky. Her mother and the two sisters belonged to another branch of the Keephart family, about seven miles away. Her father came to see her mother on Wednesday and Saturday nights. They would have big dinners on these nights in their cabin. Her father cradled all the grain for the neighborhood. He was a very high tempered man and would do no work when angry; therefore, every effort was made to keep him in a good humor when the work was heavy. Her mother died when the children were very young. Sarah was given to the Keephart daughter as a wedding present and taken to her new home....

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Obituary of Albert Davis

Funeral services for Albert Davis, 90 of Bronson, who died Tuesday at a hospital after a long illness, will be at 1:20 p.p. Thursday at Elliott Creek Presbyterian church at Bronson. Rev. Walter Smith will officiate. Burial will be in Logan Park Cemetery in Sioux City under direction of the W. Harry Christy Morningside funeral home. He was born 1 May 1867 in Hamburg, Iowa. He married Rhoda Smith in 1892 in Blair, Nebraska. The couple resided in Walhill, Nebraska before coming here in 1921. They resided most recently in Bronson. Mr. Davis was a member of Elliott Creek Presbyterian church in Bronson. His wife died in 1827 in Sioux City, Iowa. He also was preceded in death by a daughter, Bessie, who died in 1928 in Sioux City and a son Ivan, who died in 1920 in Excelsior Springs, Missouri. Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. Harriet Taylor of Sioux falls, south Dakota; four sons, Clyde, Harold, Bud and Everett, all of Sioux City, Iowa; a brother, Willie of Modale, Iowa, seven grandchildren and 11...

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Slave Narrative of George Taylor Burns

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: George Taylor Burns Location: Evansville, Indiana Ex-Slave Stories District #5 Vanderburgh County Lauana Creel THE LIFE STORY OF GEORGE TAYLOR BURNS [HW: Personal Interview] Ox-carts and flat boats, and pioneer surroundings; crowds of men and women crowding to the rails of river steamboats; gay ladies in holiday attire and gentleman in tall hats, low cut vests and silk mufflers; for the excursion boats carried the gentry of every area. A little negro boy clung to the ragged skirts of a slave mother, both were engrossed in watching the great wheels that ploughed the Mississippi river into foaming billows. Many boats stopped at Gregery’s Landing, Missouri to stow away wood, for many engines were fired with wood in the early days. The Burns brothers operated a wood yard at the Landing and the work of cutting, hewing and piling wood for the commerce was performed by slaves of the Burns plantation. George Taylor Burns was five years of age and helped his mother all day as she toiled in the wood yards. “The colder the weather, the more hard work we had to do,” declares Uncle George. George Taylor Burns, the child of Missouri slave parents, recalls the scenes enacted at the Burns’ wood yards so long ago. He is a resident of Evansville, Indiana and his snow white hair and beard bear testimony that...

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Slave Narrative of Jim Taylor

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Jim Taylor Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Talbot County, Maryland Date of Birth: 1847 Place of Residence: 424 E. 23rd St., Baltimore, Maryland Age: 89 Reference: Personal interview with Jim Taylor, at his home, 424 E. 23rd St., Baltimore. “I was born in Talbot County, Eastern Shore, Maryland, near St. Michaels about 1847. Mr. Mason Shehan’s father knew me well as I worked for him for more than 30 years after the emancipation. My mother and father both were owned by a Mr. Davis of St. Michaels who had several tugs and small boats. In the summer, the small boats were used to haul produce while the tugs were used for towing coal and lumber on the Chesapeake Bay and the small rivers on the Eastern Shore. Mr. Davis bought able-bodied colored men for service on the boats. They were sail boats. I would say about 50 or 60 feet long. On each boat, besides the Captain, there were from 6 to 10 men used. On the tugs there were more men, besides the mess boy, than on the sail boats. “I think a man by the name of Robinson who was in the coal business at Havre de Grace engaged Mr. Davis to tow several barges of soft coal to St. Michaels. It was on July 4th when we arrived at Havre de...

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