Surname: Swain

Ancestors of Frederick Macy of New Bedford Massachusetts

The Macy family of New Bedford is among the oldest and most prominent families of Nantucket, the name having been identified with the business interests of New Bedford for the past seventy years. The first American ancestor of the family was Thomas Macy, clothier merchant, who came, it is said, from the county of Wilts, England, and was in Newbury, Mass., a proprietor; he was a freeman of Sept. 6, 1639. He removed to Salisbury and was town officer and deputy. He removed about 1659 from there to Chilmark; his was the first family on Nantucket island. He was...

Read More

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Read More

Genealogies of the First Settlers of Passaic Valley

Passaic Valley in New Jersey was first settled in the early 1700’s, primarily by families from Long Island, New York and Connecticut. The Family records, or, Genealogies of the first settlers of Passaic Valley and vicinity above Chatham provides genealogies of these early settlers from family records when they could be obtained, otherwise the author used family members to provide the information. Since some of the information comes from memory of individuals, one should validate what is written before relying on it to greatly.

Read More

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Read More

News from New England – King Phillip’s War

Being a true and last account of the present Bloody Wars carried on betwixt the infidels, natives, and the English Christians, and converted Indians of New England, declaring the many dreadful battles fought betwixt them: As also the many towns and villages burnt by the merciless heathens. And also the true number of all the Christians slain since the beginning of that War, As it was sent over by a factor of New England to a merchant in London. Licensed Aug. 1. Roger L’Estrange. London. Printed for J. Corners, at the sign of the Black Raven in Duck-Lane, 1676. 1The following tract is of exceeding rarity; so much so that, not long since, but one was known to be in this country. This is reprinted from a copy of one in the library of John Carter Brown Esq., of Providence. To the politeness of this gentleman we are indebted for permission to make a transcript. The original is, without exception, one of the worst printed tracts of the day in which it appeared. The type on which it was printed was wretched, especially the Italic; some of the letters in many of the words not being distinguishable, and others entirely wanting. I have adhered, in this reprint, as closely to the original, in respect to orthography, capitals, and italics, as possible. Of its comparative value, in an historical point...

Read More

The Original Grantees of Norwich Vermont

The following is a list of men who received grants of land in the future town of Norwich Vermont on 5 July 1761. Most of these men resided in and around Mansfield Connecticut. Many of the men never set foot in the actual town of Norwich, choosing at some point not to accept Eleaer Wales Daniel Welch Abner Barker Ebenezer Wales Ebenezer Heath William Johnson ye 3d Gideon Noble James West Daniel Baldwin Calvin Topliff Samuel Johnson Elisha Wales Seth Wales Amos Fellows Jedidiah Brinton John Fowler Nathan Strong Robert Turner William Johnson Samuel Root Solomon Wales Joseph Blanchard Josiah Root Adoniram Grant George Swain Samuel Root junr Benja Jennings Moses Holmes Benjamin Sheapard Elisha Carpenter Lemuel Holmes Abner Barker Jr. Nathaniel Harriman Samuel Long Ebenezer Smith John Johnson Thomas Welch Joseph Storrs Samuel Cobb Judah Heath James Russell Hezekiah Johnson Jonathan Hatch Samuel Slafter Benja Whitney James Bicknall Jacob Fenton Moses Barnard AleazerWest Andrew Crocker Eliphas Hunt Stephen Palmer Eleazr Warner Abijah Learned The Hon. Theodore Atkinson Esq. Richard Wilbird Esq. Henry Sherburne Esq. Mr. Andrew Clarkson Clement March Esq. John Shackford Mesheck Weare Esq. Rev. Mr. Samuel Havem Peter Gilman...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Rebecca M. Swain

(See Thompson and Riley)-Joseph Polstrom, born February 11, 1834, in Birmingham, Alabama; married November 16, 1863 in Bayou Menard, Susan Rebecca Wilson, who was born July 19, 1846, at Fort Gibson. They were the parents of Rebecca McNair Polstrom, born August 19, 1864 on Bayou Menard, and was educated in the Female Seminary at Tahlequah. She married December 27, 1879, John son of George and Nancy (Cramer) Swain, born October 5, 1833 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. He served in the Union Army during the Civil War in Company E, Fourth California Infantry. He died April 6, 1920. Mr. Swain was a charter member of the Vinita Lodge No 5, A. F. & A. M. and a 32nd degree Mason. Mrs. Swain is a member of the Congregational Church; and Grand Matron of the Order of the Eastern Star of the Indian Territory, having held that position in 1895-6. She is also a member of the Woman’s Civic League, Delphian and Premier Worthwhile Clubs. Mrs. Swain’s Cherokee name is Quaitsia, and she is a member of the “Long Hair”...

Read More

R. H. Swain

Wagoner, Med. Corps., 321st Co., 81st Div., 306th San. Tr.; of Guilford County; son of V. M. and Mrs. C. Swain. Entered service June 26, 1917, at Winston-Salem, N.C. Sent to Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., transferred to Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C., then to Camp Mills, L. I. Sailed for France Aug. 7, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne Front, St. Mihiel. Drove ambulance while in France with the 31st Ambl. Corps. Returned to USA June 17, 1919, at Newport News, Va. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 26,...

Read More

J. E. Swain

Private, Q. M. C., Co. 3. Born in Washington County, N.C., Feb. 27, 1898; son of C. F. and Mrs. Lucria Swain. Husband of Mary Swain. Entered the service Dec. 10, 1917, and sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky., and then transferred to Camp Meiggs. Mustered out of the service at Camp No. 22, Rich Col, Va., Dec. 10,...

Read More

Author R. Swain

Corpl., Hdqrs. Co., 30th Div., 60th Inf. Brigade. Son of S. A. and Roella Swain, of Davidson County. Entered service May 28, 1915, at Thomasville, N.C. Was sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., transferred to Camp Merritt, N. J. Sailed for France June 5th; landed at Calais. Fought at Ypres Sector July 16th to September 3rd; Ypres-Lys offensive August 19th to November 11th; engaged in operation August 19th to September 3rd; Sommes offensive August 8th to November 11th, 1918; engaged in operation September 27th to October 19th, 1918. Arrived in USA April 10, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 14,...

Read More

Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of...

Read More

Biography of Samuel Swain

SAMUEL SWAIN. The old citizenship of Madison County had no better representative than the late Samuel Swain, who was born in Fall Creek Township in the decade of the forties, and who died on the 9th of September, 1913. He had been continuously identified with this section of the County throughout practically all the years that intervened since the pioneer period. Mr. Swain was an infant when the first railroad was brought through the County and in the vicinity of his old homestead, he was a boy in his teens when the Civil war broke out, and he witnessed practically every innovation and improvement which has been the teacher in a great civilization of a nation during the last half of the nineteenth century. Samuel Swain was born February 14, 1848. It was his distinction, such as is possessed by comparatively few of the residents of Madison County, to have been born in a log cabin. That log cabin was situated on the farm where he made his home at the time of his death. A log cabin at that time was not necessarily a sign of poverty nor shiftlessness, but was rather a representative habitation, consistent with the period of development through which the country was then plying. As a matter of fact Samuel Swain belonged to one of the thrifty and substantial Quaker families which settled in...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest