Surname: Strickland

Muster Roll of Captain John D. Barnard’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain John D. Barnard’s Company of Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the sixth day of March, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the twenty-eighth day of March, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

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A History of Waterloo New York Newspapers

The pioneer printer of Seneca County was George Lewis, who, in the year 1815, started in the village of Ovid a small sheet entitled the Seneca Patriot. The office of publication was located on Seneca Street, in the upper story of a building on whose site the engine-house now stands. At the close of a single volume, Mr. Lewis changed the name of his paper to The Ovid Gazette, and when Elisha Williams secured the removal of the County seat to Waterloo, Lewis removed hither with his press in May, 1817, and continued the issue of his paper as...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Slave Narrative of Aunt Laura Bell

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Laura Bell Location: 2 Bragg Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 73 An interview with Laura Bell, 73 years old, of 2 Bragg Street, Raleigh, North Carolina. Being informed that Laura Bell was an old slavery Negro, I went immediately to the little two-room shack with its fallen roof and shaky steps. As I approached the shack I noticed that the storm had done great damage to the chaney-berry tree in her yard, fallen limbs litterin’ the ground, which was an inch deep in garbage and water. The porch was littered with old planks and huge tubs and barrels of stagnant water. There was only room for one chair and in that sat a tall Negro woman clad in burlap bags and in her lap she held a small white flea-bitten dog which growled meaningly. When I reached the gate, which swings on one rusty hinge, she bade me come in and the Carolina Power and Light Company men, who were at work nearby, laughed as I climbed over the limbs and garbage and finally found room for one foot on the porch and one on the ground. “I wus borned in Mount Airy de year ‘fore de Yankees come, bein’ de fourth of five chilluns. My mammy an’ daddy Minerva Jane an’ Wesley ‘longed ter Mr. Mack Strickland an’ we lived on his...

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Slave Narrative of Anderson Furr

Interviewer: Sadie B. Hornsby Person Interviewed: Anderson Furr Location: Broad Street, Athens, Georgia Anderson Furr’s address led the interviewer to a physician’s residence on Broad Street, where she was directed to a small frame house on the rear of the lot. The little three-room cottage has a separate entrance from Pulaski Street. Three stone steps lead from the street to the narrow yard which is enclosed by a low rock coping. Anderson rents only one room and the remainder of the house is occupied by Annie Sims and her husband, George, who works at the Holman Hotel. Reclining comfortably in a cane-backed chair, with his walking stick conveniently placed across his knees, Anderson was enjoying the shade of a wide spread oak tree in the tidy yard. His costume consisted of a battered old black felt hat, a dingy white shirt, dark gray pants, and scuffed black shoes. Asked if he remembered the days when the North was fighting the South for his freedom, Anderson replied: “‘Member fightin’! Why, Lady! Dey ain’t never stopped fightin’ yit. Folks has been a-fightin’ ever since I come in dis world, and dey will be fightin’ long atter I is gone. “I dis’members what was de name of de town whar I was borned, but it was in Hall County. Lydia and Earl Strickland was my Ma and Pa. All of deir chillun...

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T. G. Strickland

Merchant Marine. Born in Johnston County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Strickland. Husband of Mrs. Rosa Strickland. Entered the service Aug. 2, 1918, at Smithfield, N.C. Was sent to Boston, Mass. Mustered out at Norfolk, Va., Dec. 1,...

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Larry S. Strickland

Q. M. Cook, Hdqrs. Co. Born in Wilson County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Strickland. Husband of Mrs. Ethel Strickland. Entered the service at Rocky Mount, N.C., Aug. 28, 1918. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and from there to Camp Sevier, S. C. Mustered out at Camp Sevier, S. C., Dec. 19,...

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John H. Strickland

1st Class Private, 119th Inf., 30th Div., Co. K. Born in Nash County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Strickland. Husband of Mrs. Nellie Strickland. Entered the service June 24, 1916, at Wilson, N.C. Was sent to Camp Glenn, N.C., and from there to Camp Royster, Goldsboro, N.C. On bridge duty three months at Weldon, N.C. Sailed for France May 12, 1918. Fought at Ypres, Belgium, Bellicourt, France, Premont, Busigny, St. Souplet. Returned to USA April 2, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 7, 1919. Served on the Mexican border eight...

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Decision Rendered Mary and Roy Strickland

Office Of The Assistant Attorney-General Washington, D. C., December 28, 1905 The Secretary Of The Interior SIR: I received by reference of October 10, 1905, the report from the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes of September 25, 1905, stating his inability to reconcile the decisions of the Department in the Cherokee citizenship cases of Mary and Roy Strickland, March 17, 1904 (I. T. D., 934 and 21GO 1904); January 4, 1905 (I. T. D., 30201904), and May 25, 1905, and of Ora M. Bonds, nee Camp, March 25, 1903 (I. T. D., 14181903). The Commissioner states two specific points, which he asks may be referred to me for opinion, and requests instructions thereon, viz: 1. In adjudicating the right to enrollment of applicants who had not reached their majority on September 1, 1902, and who, prior to that date, had neither an actual nor a constructive residence in said nation, what distinction, if any, is to be made between said applicants admitted to citizenship by an act of the Cherokee national council, commission on citizenship, or supreme court and those admitted to Cherokee citizenship by the Dawes Commission under the act of June 10, 1896, as in case of Roy Strickland, supra? 2. In adjudicating the right to enrollment of applicants who during their minority were duly admitted to Cherokee citizenship, what distinction, if any, is to be...

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