Surname: Stevenson

Genealogy of the Goff Family of Attleboro, Mass.

MAJ. WILLIAM HUNT GOFF, one of Attleboro’s well known citizens and leading public men, is a native of the Old Bay State, born in the town of Rehoboth, April 10, 1845. He is a descendant of one of the oldest families of Rehoboth, where the Goffs have figured more or less prominently, as well as in the nearby towns in Rhode Island, since about 1720, the date of which there is record of the families of Richard and Samuel Goff. From these two men have sprung a number whose names have been written high on the roll of fame in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, as well as men in the humbler walks of life who, nevertheless, have proved themselves honorable and useful citizens. Among the best known of the name may be mentioned the late Darius Goff, of Pawtucket, and his sons, Lyman B. and Darius, of the same city; Rufus Burr Goff, of Providence; Jeremiah Goff; the late Gen. Nathan Goff of Civil war fame; the late Albert Goff, of Attleboro, and his sons, Major William Hunt Goff and Frederic Erford Goff, all men of ability and upright living. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN...

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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History of Seneca County New York

This history of Seneca County, New York published in 1876, provides a look at the first 75 years of existence for this county, with numerous chapters devoted to it’s early history. The value of this manuscript may be found in the etched engravings found throughout of idyllic scenes of Seneca County including portraits of men, houses, buildings, farms, and scenery. Included are 35 biographies of early settlers, and histories of the individual townships along with lists of men involved in the Union Army during the Civil War on a township by township basis.

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Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to...

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Seneca County New York Cemeteries

The amount of information available for Seneca County New York cemeteries online is restricted to the number of volunteers willing to photograph and transcribe the records. There does not appear to be any one website which has a complete listing, and in fact, I would say overall there is still a lot of work to be done photographing and transcribing within Seneca County is any of you care to volunteer. The following is, however, the most complete listing available of online transcriptions and photographs.

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Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Cattaraugus Reservation, in Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Erie Counties, New York, as delineated on the map, occupies both sides of Cattaraugus creek. It is 9.5 miles long on a direct east and west line, averages 3 miles in width at the center, dropping at is eastern line an additional rectangle of 2 by 3 miles. A 6-mile strip on the north and 2 “mile blocks” at diagonal corners are occupied by white people, and litigation is pending as to their rights and responsibilities. The Seneca Nation claims that the permit or grant under which said lands were occupied and...

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Abstracts of Wills on File in the City of New York Surrogate’s Office 1660-1680

Abstracts of wills on file in the surrogate’s office city of New York 1660-1680. From May 1787 to the present, county surrogate’s courts have recorded probates. However, the court of probates and court of chancery handled estates of deceased persons who died in one county but who owned property in another. An 1823 law mandated that all probates come under the jurisdiction of the county surrogate’s courts. Each surrogate’s court has a comprehensive index to all probate records, including the unrecorded probate packets. Interestingly enough, there are wills existing and on record at the Surrogate’s Office in New York City for the time-span of 1660-1680. Genealogical extracts of these wills have been provided below.

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Slave Narrative of Mom Jessie Sparrow

Interviewer: Annie Ruth Davis Person Interviewed: Jessie Sparrow Date of Interview: September 1937 Location: Marion, South Carolina Age: 83 “No, honey, dere ain’ not a soul live here but me. Man stay in dat other room dere just to be a little bit of company for me when night come. He ain’ not a speck of kin to me, not a speck. Oh, he pay me a little somethin, but it not much. Mostly, I does want him for protection like. Ain’ got but just dis one room for myself cause dat part out dere does be just like out in de yard. Dis Miss Mary Watson house en she tell me stay on here dat de house ain’ worth no fixin. Don’ know how long I be here. No, honey, I ain’ got no property only just myself. Ain’ got not a bit. Ain’ got nothin, child. I can’ do no work dese days but dat little bit of washin dat Miss Betty have en dat ain’ nothin to depend on. Just try to do a little somethin to help myself along. Nothin worth to speak bout though.” “Miss Betty say we bout one age. My daddy belonged to Miss Betty father en dat how-come she know dere ain’ much difference in us age. My mammy was de house ‘oman on old man Sam Stevenson plantation en dat...

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Slave Narrative of Mom Jessie Sparrow

Interviewer: Annie Ruth Davis Person Interviewed: Jessie Sparrow Date of Interview: May 1937 Location: Marion, South Carolina Age: 83 “I dunno, child, I don’ ‘member nuthin more den I tell yuh de udder time. Is yuh been to see Maggie Black yet? I dunno how old she, but I know she been here. No, child, Maggie ain’ dead. She lib right down dere next Bethel Church. She move ‘way from Miss Mullins house when Gus die. Coase I ain’ ne’er been in she house a’ter she move dere, but dey say she hab uh mighty restful place dere. Dat wha’ dey tell me. Maggie oughta could tell yuh aw ’bout dem times. I ain’ know nuthin more to tell yuh. Don’ tell yuh aw I know.” “Who my mammy wuz? My mammy been Sallie Stevenson ‘fore she marry en den a’ter she marry, she waz Sallie Bowens. Don’ know whey dey ge’ de Bowens from cause my pa been b’long to be uh Evans. Dat how come Miss Betty know so much ’bout me. She say we mighty nigh de same age. Coase I don’ never ‘spute Miss Betty word, but I don’ t’ink so.” “No, child, I dunno. Dunno how many chillun my mammy is hab. Dey aw been die sech uh long time dat I don’ forgot. Coase George, de carpenter, my brother. He been train up...

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Slave Narrative of Mom Genia Woodberry

Interviewer: Annie Ruth Davis Person Interviewed: Genia Woodberry Date of Interview: June 1937 Location: Britton’s Neck, South Carolina Age: 89 “Glad to see yunnah. Who dese udder wid yah? Who yuh? Lawd, I glad to see yunnah. I nu’se aw Miss Susan fust chillun. Ne’er nu’se dem las’uns. Sicily been yo’ mamma nu’se. Nu’se Massa Ben Gause child fust en den I nu’se four head uv Miss Susan chillun a’ter she marry Massa Jim Stevenson. Sleep right dere wid dem chillun aw de time. Miss Susan ne’er didn’t suckle none uv dem chillun. I tell yunnah dis much, Massa Jim Stevenson was good to aw uv his colored people en Miss Susan wuz good to me. I sho’ born right down yonner to Massa Ben Gause plantation. Gade Caesar en Mary Gause wuz my parents. Yas’um, I is glad to see dese chillun cause yuh know whey white folks hab feeling fa yah, it sho’ make yuh hab feeling fa dey chillun. I ole now en I can’ ‘member eve’yt’ing but I ain’ ne’er forge’ wha’ good times dem wuz.” “My Lawd! Yas, my Lawd, de peoples lib well dere to Massa Jim Stevenson plantation. De white folks hab big house dere wid eve’yt’ing ’bout it jes lak uh town. I couldn’t tell yunnah how many colored peoples dey hab dere but I know dis, I hear em say...

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Slave Narrative of Mom Jessie Sparrow

Interviewer: Annie Ruth Davis Person Interviewed: Jessie Sparrow Date of Interview: May 1937 Location: Marion, South Carolina Age: 83 “Honey, my white folks been well-to-do peoples. Dey ain’ been no poor white trash. Dey hab ‘stonishing blood in dey vein. I been b’long to Massa Sam Stevenson wha’ lib right down dere ‘cross Ole Smith Swamp. Dey ain’ hab no chillun dey own, but dey is raise uh poor white girl dere, Betty. Dey gi’e (give) she eve’yt’ing she ha’e en dey school she too.” “De ole man, he mind ain’ been zactly right when he die. Dey say he bury some o’ he money down dere on he place jes ‘fore he die. Coase I dunno nuthin ’bout it, but dats wha’ dey tell me. Dey say dey never is find dat money a’ter he been dead. Reckon it dere yet, I dunno. Peoples use’er aw de time be plough up kegs en box full o’ money en va’uables wha’ de well-to-do folks been hide dere.” “De white peoples use’er bury dey silver en dey money en aw dey va’uables late on uh evenin’ er early on uh mornin’ when de Yankees come ’bout. De Yankees ‘stroy aw us white peoples va’uables wha’ dey is see. Um——dem Yankees sho’ was ‘structive whey dey is went.” “My ole mammy been Sally Stevenson ‘fore she marry en den she wuz...

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Will of John Stevenson – 1670

JOHN STEVENSEN, Newtown. Leaves to sister Mary, wife of Patrick Harris, house and land, with a share of salt meadow lying by John Borroughs. “The rest of the upland and the meadow at ye South Sea, to my brother, Edward.” To brother Thomas. “my meadow before John Lorrison’s.” Makes brother Thomas executor. Dated December 13, 1670. Witnesses, Francis Doughty, Sam’1 Moore. Thomas Stevens confirmed as executor, March 2, 1670/1. LIBER 1-2, page...

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Will of Thomas Stevenson – 1668

Robert Coe and Daniel Denton, of Jamaica, Long Island, are appointed Administrators of the estate of THOMAS STEVENSON, and guardians of his children. July 9, 1668. Ri. Nicolls. LIBER 1-2, page 25 Robert Coe resigns his appointment as Administrator of estate of THOMAS STEVENSON July 9, 1668, and Anthony Waters, of Jamaica, is appointed in his place. August 15, 1668. LIBER 1-2, page...

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