Surname: Stafford

Ancestry of the Jennings Family from Fall River, Massachusetts

Several persons bearing the name Jennings (variously spelled) located in Massachusetts in its early settlement. Richard Jennings put himself as apprentice to Robert Bartlett, of Plymouth, in 1635, for a period of years. He is said to have lived at Sandwich, whence he moved to Bridgewater, and had a family of children. The Jennings family was long prominent and highly respected in the town of Sandwich, but in time became practically extinct there. Thomas Jennings was an early settler in Portsmouth, R. I. It is, however, the purpose to refer here to the special Fall River family of the name the head of which was the late William H. Jennings. The latter was a descendant in the seventh generation from John Jennings of Sandwich, Mass., from whom his descent is through Isaac, John, Isaac, Isaac and Andrew M. Jennings. These generations follow in the order named.

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Ancestry of William Hartley Cary of Brockton, Massachusetts

William Hartley Cary was a prominent and respected citizen and business man of the city of Brockton, where his death occurred Dec. 9, 1899. As a citizen he enjoyed the esteem of the entire community, in which industrial center he had for nearly a quarter of a century been an influential and successful factor in the development of its business interests. Mr. Cary was born Jan. 10, 1852, in Charleston, Maine, son of William Harrison and Abigail (Ingles) Cary. His parents were both natives of Maine, although his earlier paternal ancestors were among the early settlers of North Bridgewater (now Brockton). A record of that branch of the Cary family through which Mr. Cary descended, which has been traced in direct line back in England to the year 1170, follows.

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Flint Family of Fall River, MA

JOHN DEXTER FLINT (deceased), merchant, trader, philanthropist and churchman, of Fall River, was in many ways a most remarkable man, one that perhaps crowded more into his three-score years of active business life in the city of his adoption than any of his contemporaries; among the foremost leaders in business lines of those who wrought with him, he no doubt was first in generous gifts to religious and church work and lines akin to it. Born April 26, 1826, in the town of North Reading, Mass., Mr. Flint was a son of Henry and Mary (Sanborn) Flint, most estimable people but of limited means. The Flints were of good Puritan stock, the North Reading family descending from (I) Thomas Flint, who, with his brother William, was here in New England probably before 1642. William became a large land owner in the vicinity of Flint street, Salem, while Thomas was one of the first settlers in that part of Salem Village which became Danvers, buying land there as early as 1662.

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1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Slave Narrative of Page Harris

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Page Harris Location: Camp Parole, Maryland Place of Birth: Charles County MD Date of Birth: 1858 Place of Residence: Campe Parole, A. A. C. Co., MD Reference: Personal interview with Page Harris at his home, Camp Parole, A.A.C. Co., Md. “I was born in 1858 about 3 miles west of Chicamuxen near the Potomac River in Charles County on the farm of Burton Stafford, better known as Blood Hound Manor. This name was applied because Mr. Stafford raised and trained blood hounds to track runaway slaves and to sell to slaveholders of Maryland, Virginia and other southern states as far south as Mississippi and Louisiana. “My father’s name was Sam and mother’s Mary, both of whom belonged to the Staffords and were reared in Charles County. They reared a family of nine children, I being the oldest and the only one born a slave, the rest free. I think it was in 1859 or it might be 1860 when the Staffords liberated my parents, not because he believed in the freedom of slaves but because of saving the lives of his entire family. “Mrs. Stafford came from Prince William County, Virginia, a county on the west side of the Potomac River in Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Stafford had a large rowboat that they used on the Potomac as a fishing and oyster boat as well...

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Biography of Rev. Michael Stafford

Rev. Michael Stafford, Priest of the Roman Catholic Church, Lindsay, is a native of the County of Lanark, Ontario, the son of a pioneer settler, Thomas Stafford, and was born March, 1, 1832. His father was from Wexford, Ireland; his mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth McGarry, from West Meath, same country. His family fought for Irish separation, and that was the reason Thomas Stafford came to Canada. Up to fourteen years of age our subject was educated at a district school near Lanark, his teacher, Robert Lees, still living, and filling the office of County Attorney of Carleton. The school house was an abandoned lumber shanty; the seats were made of basswood logs hewn flat on the upper side, and the desks were constructed by boring holes in the side of the house, driving in pegs and laying an unplaned board on the pegs. From that humble school house he was promoted to the district school in the town of Perth, where he spent two years; immediately afterwards gave one year to study at Chambly, then seven years at St. Therese College, and took his ecclesiastical course at Regiopolis College, Kingston, where he was a pupil of the late V. G. McDonnell, and a schoolmate of Rev. John O’Brien, now Bishop of Kingston. Mr. Stafford was ordained Priest in 1858, by the late Bishop Horan, and was Director...

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L. Clement Stafford

1st Lt., Inf., Co. F, 2nd Div., Regulars, 23rd Reg. Born in Guilford County; son of E. J. and Lula Stafford. Husband of Annie Fred Stafford. Entered service May 6, 1917, at Greensboro, N.C. Sent to Ft. Oglethorpe. Transferred to New York. Sailed for France Sept. 13, 1917. Fought at Champagne-Marne, Aisne, Marne-Sommes, Oise Aisne offensives. Verdun and St. Mihiel offensives. Gassed at Argonne offensives, Oct. 6, 1918. Sent to French Hospital No. 16, then Evacuation No. 3, then Base No. 2 at Neuilly, France. The 2nd Div. received six citations for which they are entitled to wear Regimental Legion of Honor. Holds Victory Medal with five bars for major...

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Stafford, Theodore – Obituary

Theodore Stafford, 75-year-old hermit, was found dead in his cabin on his homestead, 12 miles from Richland, on Wednesday of last week. Heart disease is given as the cause of death. The funeral was held in Richland. North Powder News Saturday, March 5,...

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Stafford Family Cemetery, Mc Kean, Pennsylvania

Stafford Family Cemetery located on Shadduck Road in McKean, Erie County, Pennsylvania. STAFFORD Amy, d. 14 Feb. 1867, ae. 74 yrs., 11 mos., 29 days. Wife of Jonas Stafford. Jonas, d. 31 July 1852, ae. 78 yrs. Husband of Amy Stafford. Approximate location based on street name: [map id=”map” z=”15″ lat=”41.977761″ lon=”-80.162616″] Decimal Degrees: Latitude: 41.977761 Longitude:...

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Biography of Stafford, William

William Stafford, one of the early settlers of Fort Bend County, was a native of Tennessee, but emigrated from that grand old State to that of Louisiana, where he engaged in raising cane and, making sugar. He was married twice; his first rife was Miss Donald, of Tennessee, and the second Miss Martha Cartwright, of Louisiana. In 1822 he came to Texas as one of the colonists of Stephen. F. Austin and first located near San Felipe, but later settled at what is now known as “Stafford’s Point” on Oyster Creek, in Fort Bend County, fifteen miles east of Richmond. Mr. Stafford, had two residences for convenience as to the seasons. The fall, winter and spring place was in the bottom at the farm on Oyster Creek at Stafford’s Lake. The summer place as in the prairie, a road being cut through the dense brush, timber and cane, nearly two miles, connecting the two places. His grant of land consisted of one and a half leagues, this surplus from the stipulated number of acres that each settler was to receive being added to his headright by General Austin for valuable services performed, in the affairs of the colony. At Stafford’s Point he put up a cane mill and made his own sugar, having planted the first cane and made the first sugar in fort Bend County. He also put...

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