Surname: Smyser

Biography of William Gardner Smyser

William Gardner Smyser, now living retired at Topeka, is one of the interesting citizens of the capital city both on account of his individual experiences and his long service as a railroad and constructing engineer, and also because of his family lineage. Ho is connected by family ties with a number of notable Americans. The Smysors came out of Germany and settled in Pennsylvania early in the eighteenth century. The cause of their coming to America was participation in some revolutionary movement in Germany. The original name of the family was Bowemund. The Bowemunds and others had some part in a local rebellion, and as they failed to accomplish their purpose they had to flee the country, and all of them changed their names. The Bowemund immigrant changed his name to Schmeisser, a word meaning in German a person who delivers a blow or a striker. The name had since been changed to its present form. William G. Smyser’s grandfather was George Smyser, who was born in York County, Pennsylvania, and spent his life in that state, largely as a banker. For a number of years he served as an associate judge. He died at Gettysburg. He had served loyally with the American army in the War of 1812. The maiden name of his wife was Catherine Gardner, who was a lifelong resident of Pennsylvania. Daniel M. Smyser, father...

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Biography of William Christee Smyser

William Christee Smyser, who died at Sterling, Kansas, August 9, 1917, had been for thirty-five years a resident of that section of the state. Few men have assumed and carried out to such a successful conclusion the larger responsibilities of business affairs. One of the outstanding characteristics of big business men is a quiet efficiency of performance that handles a great volume of work with a notable absence of noise and confusion. This quiet efficiency was a mark of Mr. Smyser’s entire career. Under his direction large affairs were transacted and things got themselves done in the form of concrete results, but in such a way as to attract little notice to the source of the power and energy. The foundation of his business success was laid during his connection with the broom corn industry of Western Kansas. For a number of years he was one of the most extensive dealers in this crop, buying in carload lots. After he gave this up he concentrated all his time upon the buying and feeding of sheep, and was undoubtedly one of the biggest producers of mutton and wool in the State of Kansas. He amassed a large property in farm land and always lived in close touch with the soil. He was a student of farming from its scientific as well as practical point of view. He knew and understood...

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Biographical Sketch of George W. Smyser

Smyser, George W. of the firm of J. A. T. Dixon & Co., located on a homestead near Dorrance, in 1871 and farmed three years. He then served as County Treasurer four years, then into general hardware trade at Russell two years, then farmed two years south of the latter village, then went into business at Bunker Hill. Born in York County, Pa., in 1832, where he was raised and educated. Married in 1854 to Mary Hunes of the same place. They have three children: Leila J. Emma E. and Martin B. He is a member of the A. O. U. W and I. O. O. F He enlisted in 1864 in Company C, One Hundred and Sixty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Re-enlisted in 1864 in Company I, Two Hundred and Ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Participated in all the battles of his command. Mustered out in Alexandria, Va. in May...

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