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Surname: Sheridan

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous....

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Gov. Perier and Bienville

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now While the English east of the Alleghany mountains were adopting active, but secret measures, to stop the progress of French colonization on the banks of the Mississippi river, their traders were meeting the French traders every where among the southern Indians, and their mutual animosity and competition causing frequent quarrels, oft terminating in collisions, in which the unfortunate Indians always became involved on the one or the other side. But the French, at an; early day had excited the animosity of the Chickasaws by failing to...

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Moravian Massacre at Gnadenbrutten

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In the early part of the year 1763 two Moravian missionaries, Post and Heckewelder, established a mission among the Tuscarawa Indians, and in a few years they had three nourishing missionary stations, viz: Shoenbrun, Gnadenbrutten and Salem, which were about five miles apart and fifty miles west of the present town of Steubenville, Ohio. During our Revolutionary War their position being midway between the hostile Indians (allies of the British) on the Sandusky River, and our frontier settlements, and therefore on the direct route of the...

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The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a...

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Massacre at Howard’s Well and Other Depredations – Indian Wars

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Closely following the outbreak of the┬áCherokees and half -breed renegades at Whitemore‘s, Barren Fork, came on attack by a similar party of Indians, half breeds, and Mexicans combined, on a train of supplies, en route to Fort Stockton, at Howard’s Well, near old Fort Lancaster. The facts of this one of the most inhuman massacres in history were reported to the “War Department, by Col. Merritt, through General Angua, under date of April 29th, 1872. We give the report as written: On the 20th inst, I arrived with the cavalry of my command at Howard’s Well, a few hours too late to prevent one of the most horrible massacres that has ever been perpetrated on this frontier. A Mexican train, loaded with United States commissary and ordinance stores, on its way from San Antonio to Fort Stockton, was attacked by Indians, plundered and burned. All the people with the train, seventeen souls in all, were killed or wounded, except one woman. My command buried eleven bodies, and brought three wounded men and one woman into this post. Before arriving at the burning train, the first intimation we had of the horrible disaster were the charred and blackened corpses of some of the poor victims, but no one was alive to tell the horrors of the affair....

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General History of the Western Indian Tribes 1851-1870 – Indian Wars

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Up to 1851, the immense uninhabited plains east of the Rocky Mountains were admitted to be Indian Territory, and numerous tribes roamed from Texas and Mexico to the Northern boundary of the United States. Then came the discovery of gold in California, drawing a tide of emigration across this wide reservation, and it became necessary, by treaty with the Indians, to secure a broad highway to the Pacific shore. By these treaties the Indians were restricted to certain limits, but with the privilege of ranging, for...

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William Cody – “Buffalo Bill” His Life and Adventures – Indian Wars

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now One of the best known, and since the death of the renowned Kit Carson, probably the most reliable guide on the Western frontier, is William Cody, otherwise known as “Buffalo Bill.” His exploits have been the theme of a dozen novelists, and in the year just past (1870-72) his movements have been as accurately and frequently chronicled by the daily press throughout the country as they would have been had he been an official magnate of the highest degree. There is something especially attractive in the...

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Biography of Arthur Sheridan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Arthur Sheridan is one of the live and enterprising real estate men of Champaign, and has been broker and agent for some extensive blocks of central Illinois farm lands and has handled a number of important transactions in that field. He is also well known in local politics and is one of the citizens of Champaign who can be counted upon for effective exertion of public spirited service. Mr. Sheridan was born in Champaign, September 16, 1874, a son of Patrick and Catherine (Sullivan) Sheridan. His father was a native of County Mayo and his mother of County Cork, Ireland. Patrick Sheridan came to America about 1850, living in New York State for several years and in 1854 coming to Champaign County. He was long and successfully identified with mercantile pursuits in this county and died here in November, 1892. His widow survived him until March, 1894. They had seven children: John, Maria and William, all deceased; Anna, custodian of the State Home at Geneva, Illinois; Dominick and Elizabeth, deceased; and Arthur. Arthur Sheridan grew up in Champaign, attended St. Mary’s Parochial School, but at the age of fifteen gave up his studies and books to earn his own living. For three years he worked on a farm, and for about four years was connected with...

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