Surname: Sheppard

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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Sons of Quebec 1778-1843

The Sons of Quebec (Fils de Qu├ębec) were written by Pierre-Georges Roy and published in 1933 in a four volume set. They provide a series of short biographies of one to three pages of Quebec men from 1778-1843. Warning… this manuscript is in French!

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Slave Narrative of Morris Sheppard

Person Interviewed: Morris Sheppard Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Date of Birth: November, 1852 Age: 85 Old Master tell me I was borned in November 1852, at de old home place about five miles east of Webbers Falls, mebbe kind of northeast, not far from de east bank of de Illinois River. Master’s name was Joe Sheppard, and he was a Cherokee Indian. Tall and slin and handsome. He had black eyes and mustache but his hair was iron gray, and everybody liked him because he was so good-natured and kind. I don’t remember old Mistress’ name. My mammy was a Crossland Negro before she come to belong to Master Joe and marry my pappy, and I think she come wid old Mistress and belong to her. Old Mistress was small and mighty pretty too, and she was only half Cherokee. She inherit about half a dozen slaws, and say dey was her own and old Master can’t sell one unless she give him leave to do it. Dey only had two families of slaves wid about twenty in all, and dey only worked about fifty acres, so we sure did work every foot of it good. We git three or four crops of different things out of dat farm every year. and something growing on dat place winter and summer. Pappy’s name was Caesar Sheppard and Mammy’s name was...

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Henrietta Todd Bradley

BRADLEY, Henrietta Todd6, (Josiah5, Abner4, Ithamar3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Sept. 6, 1810, married Oct. 12, 1830, Walter G., son of Jabez Bradley, of Hamden, Conn., who was born Nov. 16, 1808. Children: I. Jabez, b. Sept. 5, 1832, d. Aug. 24, 1867, unmarried. II. Dan, b. June 21, 1834, m. Emma, daughter of Calvin King, who was born April 20, 1841. He was a farmer and lived near King Ferry, N. Y. III. Antoinette, b. Nov. 20, 1836, d. July 1, 1872, m. May 14, 1863, Walter B., son of George A. Sheppard. He was a farmer. IV. Victoria, b. June 9, 1836, unmarried. V. Samuel Carlyle, b. Feb. 28, 1842, m. April 1, 1864, Julia Gertrude, tenth child of Dr. Wyans and Julia Ann (Loomis) Bush, of Branchport, Yates County, N. Y. He enlisted in the Union Army as private; later he was promoted to First Lieutenant. He lives at King Ferry, N. Y. VI. Cornelia Esther, b. Feb. 6, 1851, m. Sept. 27, 1870, Charles E., son of Ezra C. and Caroline A. (Waltron) Slocum, of King Ferry, N....

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Canton Asylum, 1910, List of Patients

In 1898, Congress passed a bill creating the only ‘Institution for Insane Indians’ in the United States. The Canton Indian Insane Asylum, South Dakota (sometimes called Hiawatha Insane Asylum) opened for the reception of patients in January, 1903. Many of the inmates were not mentally ill. Native Americans risked being confined in the asylum for alcoholism, opposing government or business interests, or for being culturally misunderstood. A 1927 investigation conducted by the Bureau of Indian Affairs determined that a large number of patients showed no signs of mental illness. The asylum was closed in 1934. While open, more than...

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Biography of Henry Sheppard

Henry Sheppard, among the early people of Greene county, was the man who made and left the best impression. He was born in Cumberland county, New Jersey, on November 8th, 1821, of the seventh generation from the original settler of his name. His father was a quiet man of moderate means who gave to his sons what education he could in schools and at home taught them, by precept and by example, industry, self-reliance and truth. The mother was a deeply religious woman. Henry, the oldest son, an ambitious and independent boy supported himself from the age of fifteen. He was trained in business in an old-fashioned Philadelphia firm; and he learned well their lessons of judgment and labor. During these years of youth his chief recreation were a literary society and the volunteer fire company to which he belonged. Often after a hard day in the store he would run miles with his engine and work for hours at night, sometimes in stations of danger. A vent for his superabundant energy was necessary, and he found it in this innocent excitement. During this period he joined the church of Dr. Albert Barnes, whose influence on his life was great and good. Leaving Philadelphia with the savings of his salary and full credit on his late employers’ book, he went in 1843 to Camden, Ark., where he remained about...

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