Surname: Rugg

Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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Abstracts of Wills on File in the City of New York Surrogate’s Office 1660-1680

Abstracts of wills on file in the surrogate’s office city of New York 1660-1680. From May 1787 to the present, county surrogate’s courts have recorded probates. However, the court of probates and court of chancery handled estates of deceased persons who died in one county but who owned property in another. An 1823 law mandated that all probates come under the jurisdiction of the county surrogate’s courts. Each surrogate’s court has a comprehensive index to all probate records, including the unrecorded probate packets. Interestingly enough, there are wills existing and on record at the Surrogate’s Office in New York City for the time-span of 1660-1680. Genealogical extracts of these wills have been provided below.

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Will of Roger Rugg – 1675

“Whereas ROGER RUGG, merchant, of this city, dyed lately without making any formal will, yet by a nuncupative will, before sufficient testimony, some short time before his decease, bequeathed his estate to Mr. John Rider and his wife of this city, and desiring Captain Nathaniel Davenport to be assisting unto them, and having made proof of the will before the Court of Mayor and Aldermen.” The said John Rider is made administrator, August 9, 1675. LIBER 1-2, page...

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Biographical Sketch of Daniel Rugg

Daniel Rugg, one of the early settlers of Hinsdale, came from Framingham, Mass., and located as a farmer in the northeastern part of the town, where Daniel Freeman now lives. Here he commenced his pioneer life, on a small clearing, and lived in a log cabin until he built the house now occupied by Mr. Freeman. He reared a family of nine children. none of whom are now living, and attained the age of over eighty years. Elijah, his oldest son, a farmer, located in Windham,. Vt. Nathan, the second son, remained on the homestead with his father, married Sally Gray and reared eleven children, six of whom are living, four in this vicinity, viz.: Mrs. Sarah A. Marsh, a widow, in the village; Hannah H. (Mrs. Erastus Butler), on River street; Fanny (Mrs. Elihu Blanchard). on Main street; and Levi G., a farmer near the town line in Winchester- Nathan Rugg attained the age of eighty-three years and died on the homestead. The other children of Daniel were Betsey, who married Harry Ide, and settled in town; Sally, who married Ivah Newton, a cooper, and also settled here; Daniel, who located in Salem, Mass., where he was a tallow chandler; John, who located in Portsmouth, N. H., also a tallow chandler; and Nellie, who married Pliny Smith, a farmer, and settled in Hinsdale. This family was noted for...

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