Surname: Robinson

1867 Plymouth County Massachusetts Directory, Oil and Candle Manufacturers to Pump Makers

Oil and Candle Manufacturers  Judd L. S., Marion Organ Manufacturers Reynolds P., N. Bridgewater Marston A. B. Campello, Bridgewater Oysters and Refreshments (See Eating Houses) Nash J. E. Abington Douglas W. East Abington Gilman A. N., Bridgewater Fuller John, Bridgewater Hull J. C., Bridgewater Tripp B. F., Middleboro Union Saloon, Middleboro Grover R. B., No. Bridgewater Washburn and Richardson, No. Bridgewater Ballard S. D., Plymouth Dodge J. E., Plymouth Painters Carriage  Peirce Wm. M., Abington Ford B. F. East Abington Bates Asa, South Abington Hersey David A. Hingham Sprague Joseph T., Hingham Eldridge David, Kingston Boomer B. L., Middleboro Southworth Rodney E., Middleboro Sparrow J. G., North Bridge water Jones John B., North Bridge water Sargent Samuel, Bridge water Thomas William E., Bridge water Jones Charles L., Plymouth Young Charles, Scituate Young Edw., Scituate Painters (House and Sign) Davis W. H.. Abington French Joseph, Abington Ford B. F., East Abington Gilson L. C., East Abington Lawrence Thomas R., East Abington Lincoln S. B., North Abington Harding J. S., South Abington Beed Philip, South Abington Alden James S., Bridgewater Braman H. F. & J. G., Bridgewater Chandler Alden, Duxbury Hathaway Joshua W., Duxbury Sampson Alfred, Duxbury Grow & Wentworth, East Bridgewater Bonney E. P., Halifax Cook John, Halifax Bailey Melzer, Hanover Bryant Snow, Hanover Corbin Frank, Hanover Eells John P., Hanover Sturtevant George, Hanover Roberts John C., Hanson Cobb David, Hingham Cross and...

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Abstracts of Wills on File in the City of New York Surrogate’s Office 1660-1680

Abstracts of wills on file in the surrogate’s office city of New York 1660-1680. From May 1787 to the present, county surrogate’s courts have recorded probates. However, the court of probates and court of chancery handled estates of deceased persons who died in one county but who owned property in another. An 1823 law mandated that all probates come under the jurisdiction of the county surrogate’s courts. Each surrogate’s court has a comprehensive index to all probate records, including the unrecorded probate packets. Interestingly enough, there are wills existing and on record at the Surrogate’s Office in New York City for the time-span of 1660-1680. Genealogical extracts of these wills have been provided below.

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Slave Narrative of Joe Robinson

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Joe Robinson Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Mason County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1854 Place of Residence: 1132 Cornell Avenue Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE JOE ROBINSON-EX-SLAVE 1132 Cornell Avenue Joe Robinson was born in Mason County, Kentucky in 1854. His master, Gus Hargill, was very kind to him and all his slaves. He owned a large farm and raised every kind of vegetation. He always gave his slaves plenty to eat. They never had to steal food. He said his slaves had worked hard to permit him to have plenty, therefore they should have their share. Joe, his mother, a brother, and a sister were all on the same plantation. They were never sold, lived with the same master until they were set free. Joe’s father was owned by Rube Black, who was very cruel to his slaves, beat them severely for the least offense. One day he tried to beat Joe’s father, who was a large strong man; he resisted his master and tried to kill him. After that he never tried to whip him again. However, at the first opportunity, Rube sold him. The Robinson family learned the father had been sold to someone down in Louisiana. They never heard from, or of him, again. Interviewer’s Comment Mr. Robinson lives...

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Slave Narrative of Henrietta Jackson

Interviewer: Virginia Tulley Person Interviewed: Henrietta Jackson Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana Virginia Tulley District #2 Fort Wayne, Indiana EX-SLAVE OF ALLEN COUNTY [MRS. HENRIETTA JACKSON] References: A. Ft. Wayne News Sentinel November 21, 1931 B. Personal interview [TR: There are no ‘A’ and ‘B’ annotations in the interview.] Mrs. Henrietta Jackson, Fort Wayne resident, is distinguished for two reasons; she is a centennarian and an ex-slave. Residing with her daughter, Mrs. Jackson is very active and helps her daughter, who operates a restaurant, do some of the lighter work. At the time I called, an August afternoon of over 90 degrees temperature, Mrs. Jackson was busy sweeping the floor. A little, rather stooped, shrunken body, Mrs. Jackson gets around slowly but without the aid of a cane or support of any kind. She wears a long dark cotton dress with a bandana on her head with is now quite gray. Her skin is walnut brown her eyes peering brightly through the wrinkles. She is intelligent, alert, cordial, very much interested in all that goes on about her. Just how old Mrs. Jackson is, she herself doesn’t know, but she thinks she is about 105 years old. She looks much younger. Her youngest child is 73 and she had nine, two of whom were twins. Born a slave in Virginia, record of her birth was kept by the master. She...

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Slave Narrative of Belle Robinson

Interviewer: Eliza Ison Person Interviewed: Belle Robinson Location: Garrard County, Kentucky Place of Birth: Garrard County, Kentucky Date of Birth: June 3rd, 1853 I found Aunt Belle sitting on the porch, dressed nice and clean with a white handkerchief pinned on her neck. When I went to her and told her who I was and the reason for my visit her face beamed with smiles and she said “Lawdy, it has been so long that I have forgot nearly everything I knew”. Further investigation soon proved that she had not forgotten, for her statements were very intelligent. She was working on a quilt and close investigation found that the work was well done. Aunt Belle tells me “I was born June 3rd, 1853 in Garrard County near Lancaster. My mother’s name was Marion Blevin and she belonged to the family of Pleas Blevin. My father’s name was Arch Robinson who lived in Madison County. Harrison Brady bought me from Ole Miss Nancy Graham and when Mr. Brady died and his property was sold Mrs. Brady bought me back; and she always said that she paid $400 for me. I lived in that family for three generations, until every one of them died. I was the only child and had always lived at the big house with my mistus. I wore the same kind of clothes and ate the same...

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Slave Narrative of Isaac Stier

Interviewer: Edith Wyatt Moore Person Interviewed: Isaac Stier Location: Natchez, Mississippi Date of Birth: Jefferson County MS “Miss, my name is Isaac Stier, but folks calls me ‘Ike.’ I was named by my pappy’s young Marster an’ I aint never tol’ nobody all o’ dat name. It’s got twenty-two letters in it. It’s wrote but in de fam’ly Bible. Dat’s how I knows I’ll be one hund’ed years old if I lives ’til de turn o’ de year. I was born in Jefferson County ‘tween Hamburg an’ Union Church. De plantation joined de Whitney place an’ de Montgomery place, too. I b’longed to Marse Jeems Stowers. I don’t rightly ‘member how many acres my Marster owned, but ’twas a big plantation wid eighty or ninety head o’ grown folks workin’ it. No tellin’ how many little black folks dey was. “My mammy was Ellen Stier an’ my pappy was Jordon Stier. He was bought to dis country by a slave dealer from Nashville, Tennessee. Dey traveled all de way through de Injun Country on afoot. Dey come on dat Trace road. Twant nothin’ but a Injun Trail. “When dey got to Natchez de slaves was put in de pen ‘tached to de slave markets. It stood at de forks o’ St. Catherine Street an’ de Liberty road. Here dey was fed an’ washed an’ rubbed down lak race hosses....

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Will of Thomas Robinson – 1671

Whereas THOMAS ROBINSON, late of Newtown, died intestate, leaving two sons, his only children, namely, Thomas and Josyas, the care of whom for the present is committed by the officers of the town to Jacob Reade, their uncle. He is appointed administrator, September 23, 1671. LIBER 1-2, page...

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Slave Narrative of Charlie Robinson

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Charlie Robinson Location: Winnsboro, South Carolina Age: 87 Ex-Slave 87 Years Old Charlie Robinson lives nine miles northwest of Winnsboro, S.C., on lands of Mr. R.W. Lemmon. There is one other occupant in the four-room house, John Giles, a share cropper. The house has two fireplaces, the brick chimney being constructed in the center of the two main rooms. The other two rooms are shed rooms. Charlie ekes out a living as a day laborer on the farm. “They been tellin’ me to come to de social circle and see ’bout my pension but I never is got dere. It been so hot, I hate to hotfoot it nine miles to Winnsboro and huff dat same distance back on a hot summer day. “Glad you come out here but sorry of de day, ’cause it is a Friday and all de jay-birds go to see de devil dat day of de week. It’s a bad day to begin a garment, or quilt or start de lye hopper or ‘simmon beer keg or just anything important to yourself on dat day. Dere is just one good Friday in de year and de others is given over to de devil, his imps, and de jay-birds. Does I believe all dat? I believes it ‘nough not to patch dese old breeches ’til tomorrow and not start...

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Slave Narrative of Harriett Robinson

Person Interviewed: Harriet Robinson Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Bastrop, Texas Date of Birth: September 1, 1842 Age: 95 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph Vann bought him, so he never did learn to talk much Cherokee. My mammy was a Cherokee slave, and talked it good. My husband was a Cherokee born Negro, too, and when he got mad he forgit all the English he knowed. Old Master Joe had a mighty big farm and several families of Negroes, and he was a powerful rich man. Pappy’s name was Kalet Vann, and mammy’s name was Sally. My brothers was name Sone and Frank. I had one brother and one sister sold when I was little and I don’t remember the names. My other sisters was Polly, Ruth and Liddie. I had to work in the kitchen when I was a gal, and they was ten or twelve children smaller than me for me...

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Biographical Sketch of Presley B. Robinson

PRESLEY B. ROBINSON, Postmaster of Kirkmansville, was born May 3, 1844, in Christian County, Ky. His parents were Harvey and Elizabeth (Thompson, Grant) Robinson, both natives of Christian County, Ky. The father was a farmer and a highly respected pioneer settler of his county. He with his wife were devoted members of the Baptist Church. The mother died August, 1845, at the age of thirty-one years. The father died November 25, 1876, aged sixty-nine years. Our subject began for himself without anything in the way of finances, at the age of nineteen years. He began farming and continued that sixteen years. He then began in the mercantile business in a store in Kirkmansville, styled “P. B. Robinson’s Store.” He continued in that business five years, when he sold to Mr. Gates. He continues in the store clerking, and serving as Postmaster. He owns one among the nicest dwellings in the town, also ten acres of ground with the store-house and lot. He is a successful business man and his outlook encouraging. He was married October 19, 1864, to Miss Eliza A. Griffin, of this county. James H., Frank T. and Carrie T. are their children. Both parents are members of the Christian Church. Mr. Robinson is a member of the Masonic...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Leroy S. Robinson

(See Grant) George Ella, daughter of R. A. and Edith Caroline (Rogers) Prather, was born on Beatties Prairie, January 15, 1869; was educated in Delaware District and the Female Seminary, graduating June 28, 1894. She married at Vinita October 29, 1895, Leroy S., son of William and Malinda Robinson. They are the parents of LeElla, born in April 1900; Carleton, born February 15, 1902, and Leroy Prather Rogers, born April 5, 1905. Leroy S. Robinson died April 26, 1911. Mrs. Robinson is a member of the Methodist church. LeElla Robinson graduated from the Vinita High School and the Northeastern State Normal at Tahlequah. She attended the Collies Agricultural College at Fort Collies, Colorado, where she was a member of the Kappa Delta Sorority. She married on December 24, 1919, Chesley H. Harris. Nancy Downing married Charles Rogers zed they had two children; Pleasant and Eliza Rogers who married John Seabolt. Nancy’s second husband was Thomas Fields and their seven children were, consecutively: Sallie Elizabeth, who married James Hildebrand; Rachel Jane, married William Stiff and Henry Richard Fields married Rachel Goss; Margaret Wilson married Robert Mosby French; Josiah Foreman died in California, December 13, 1852, and Caroline Matilda Rogers Fields married William Penn Boudinot. Pleasant Rogers was the father of Mrs. Edith Caroline (Rogers)...

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Biography of Samuel R. H. Robinson

In the history of railroad building throughout the American continent the name of Samuel Roland Hiland Robinson figures prominently. For many years he was accorded and executed most important contracts of that character, being associated with the construction of many of the most important times west of the Mississippi as well as in Canada and in Mexico. He developed splendid executive ability, and his administrative direction of his affairs showed him to be a man of keen insight and wide vision. For many years he maintained his home in St. Louis and was regarded as one of its most valued citizens. He was born in the county of Gray, Ontario, Canada, November 22, 1860, his parents being Thomas Argo and Sarah (Scott) Robinson, both natives of the north of Ireland. He acquired a common school education in Ontario and in 1872 obtained a position as water boy on the Hamilton Northwestern Railroad of Canada. Later he occupied various railroad positions and also worked in lumber camps in Michigan. In 1882 he took up railroad building as a contractor and was superintendent and manager of the Minnesota & Arizona Construction Company, building railroads and canals in Arizona. From 1898 until 1900 he was superintendent of construction of the Vera Cruz al Pacifico Railroad in Mexico. Through the succeeding two years he engaged in the building of the Arizona & Southwestern...

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Biography of William I. Robinson

Mr. Raymond practiced his profession at Chippawa until the close of the rebellion in 1838, acting as a soldier during that exciting period, and then moved to St. Catharines, where he continued his practice and his connection with the military, being promoted, step by step, to a Captaincy in the 5th Lincoln, Lieut. Colonel John Clark, commander. From 1845 to 1853 he again resided in Chippawa; and returning to St. Catharines he remained there until the separation of the Counties of Lincoln and Welland in 1856, when he was appointed Clerk of the Peace for Welland, and removed to his present home. Subsequently he was appointed County Attorney, and still holds both offices, continuing, meantime, his legal practice, and doing a good business in the several Courts. He is a careful lawyer, very attentive to his business, prompt and perfectly reliable. Mr. Raymond has often served as a trustee of the Grammar School, and has occasionally acted as chairman of that Board, being ready at all times, we understand, to cooperate with his fellow citizens in promoting the educational interests of this the county town, whose schools have a high reputation. Mr. Raymond is a member of the Church of England; has served as warden a number of years, and has been a delegate to the Synod at sundry times. In October, 1855, Miss Mary Jane Cochrane, of St....

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Biographical Sketch of James Robinson

James Robinson was born on the 13th of February, 1834; is a native of this town, and one of the leading manufacturers and business men of Markham. His father, John Robinson, a native of Toronto, and a tanner by trade, is still living in Markham. His great-grandfather was from the county of Tyrone, Ireland, settling in Pennsylvania, and his grand-father, William Robinson, a United Empire Loyalist, settled at Queenston, Ontario, a short time after the American Revolution, and was at Toronto during part of the war of 1812-14, dying in Markham in 1824. The wife of William Robinson was a Wilson, from New Jersey, dying at Markham about 1810. The mother of our subject, before her marriage, was Hannah Armstrong, from the county of Cumberland, England, she died in 1844. Mr. Robinson received an ordinary English education in the local schools; learned his father’s trade, and has been a leather manufacturer since 1855, doing, on an average, a business of about $20,000 a year. He has also a well improved farm adjoining the village, some of it in the corporation. He grows different kinds of small grain, usually of a very fine quality. His wheat crop in 1875 averaged forty-seven bushels to the acre. Mr. Robinson was deputy reeve in 1866; reeve from 1868 to 1879, except one year; was warden of the county of York in 1877, and...

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