Surname: Robertson

Bloody Scenes in Alabama and Georgia

At this period, some exciting scenes occurred in the region now known as North Alabama. We have already followed a party of emigrants to the Cumberland. Many others flocked to that country, and it soon became well settled, for a wild country. The Upper Creeks and Cherokees continually made war upon these Cumberland people. The French, upon the Wabash, had, for a long time, carried on a commerce, near the sites of the present towns of Tuscumbia and Florence. So long as M. Viez was at the head of this trade, the Cumberland people were not harassed; but, recently, he had been succeeded by others, who supplied the Indians with arms, and encouraged them to attack the American settlements. The latter had only acted upon the defensive, but it was now determined to advance upon the frontier towns of the Indians. June 1 1787: One hundred and thirty men assembled, from different parts of the Cumberland region, and marched, under Colonel James Robertson, to the Tennessee river, piloted by two Chickasaws. David Hays was dispatched from Nashville with boats, laden with provisions, destined for the Muscle Shoals. Descending the Cumberland, he was furiously attacked by the Indians, at the mouth of Duck River, and, after some of his men had been killed and others wounded, he returned to Nashville with his boats. Owing to this the horsemen were without...

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English Settlement on the Holsten River

In the meantime, the wild region upon the Cumberland river was explored, and some temporary establishments formed at the bluff, on which is now situated the city of Nashville. Captain James Robertson was the hero of these bold adventures, and had several times, with a small party of men, cut his way from extreme East Tennessee to that country, passing over the lofty Cumberland mountains and through dangerous Indian settlements. Returning to the Holston, after having made several of these trips, he raised a large company of emigrants, and built boats at Long Island. When they were nearly ready to be launched, he placed himself at the head of a horse party, and set out over the mountains for the Cumberland, intending to leave signs upon the trees at the head of the Muscle Shoals, after going from Nashville to that place. These signs he intended for the purpose of letting the voyagers know whether it would be practicable for them to disembark at the Muscle Shoals and go to the Cumberland by land. A large number of flat boats, filled with emigrants and their effects, began the voyage from Long Island, upon the Holston. Those recollected will be mentioned, for the gratification of descendants. The large Donaldson family, who, after reaching the Cumberland, settled upon Stone’s river, and became connected by affinity with General Andrew Jackson, all embarked...

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Extreme Perils and Suffering of the Natchez Refugees

During the siege of Pensacola, a series of events, of an interesting and romantic character, began at Natchez, and afterwards ended, with unparalleled sufferings, in the vast Indian wilderness, which extended from thence to the Ogechee River, in the distant province of Georgia. Some citizens of the Natchez district, the most prominent of whom were Philip Alston, Colonel Hutchens, John Alston, Captain Thaddeus Lyman, Thompson Lyman, Jacob Blomont, and Jacob Winfrey, put themselves at the head of a large party of royalists, for the purpose of seizing Fort Panmure, and expelling there from the Spanish troops, who had held it since September, 1780. They had learned that a powerful British fleet was off the Florida coast, whose object was the re-occupation of the country, and, believing that Don Galvez had already been defeated at Pensacola, they resolved immediately to anticipate what they supposed would be the desire of their King. Having assembled a large body of Choctaws, the insurgents assumed a position upon an eminence, above the town of Natchez, in full view of the fort. At night they advanced and planted their artillery so as to bear upon the works; but, when day approached, the Spanish cannonade compelled them to retire. During the succeeding twenty-four hours, the firing continued between the parties. Apr. 29 1781: The commandant sent a flag to Colonel Hutchens, representing the danger of rebellion,...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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Biography of John Evans Robertson

John Evans Robertson, a wellknown ice dealer of Concord, was born May 9, 1843, in Warner, N.H., son of Harrison D. and Sarah C. (Evans) Robertson, both of Warner. The families of both parents were old residents of Merrimack County, New Hampshire. The maternal ancestors originally came from Newburyport, Mass., where Grandfather Benjamin Evans officiated as Sheriff, being also a prominent business man. John E. Robertson attended the public schools of Warner, and subsequently fitted for college in the academy at Henniker, N.H. However, after leaving school at the age of eighteen, he did not go to college. In 1864 he went to Montreal, and there engaged in the produce business, under the firm name of Buck, Robertson & Co. Six years later, on account of ill health, he returned to Warner, where he conducted a country store until 1874, when he came to Concord. Here he was assistant cashier of the National Savings Bank for eight years. Beginning in 1882 he dealt in coal, wood, and ice until 1888, when he sold out on account of failing health. Three years later he resumed the ice business, which he still carries on. He is a trustee and the assistant treasurer of the National Savings Bank. When the institution went into liquidation in 1877, he was appointed assignee by the court. He is also a trustee of the Guarantee Savings...

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Biographical Sketch of Judge A. E. Robertson

(See Ghigau, Foreman, Riley and Conrad).—Arthur Evans son of Evans Price and Sarah Ellen (Spears) Robertson was born at Hulbert, Cherokee Nation, Tuesday, September 18, 1888. He was educated in the Cherokee National Schools, Henry Kendall College of Muskogee, graduating from the preparatory department; St. Charles Military College, St. Charles, Missouri; University of Tulsa, from which he graduated; University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and University of Paris, Paris, France. He served in the A. E. F. in France with the 143rd Infantry, 36th Division. His Cherokee name is Wah-la-seee and he belongs to the Bird Clan. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and the Knights of Pythias fraternity. Reverend Evans Price, son of Wade Hampton, and Diana (Hair) Robertson was born at Tahlequah, October 10, 1855. Married at Tahlequah, June 24, 1883 Sarah Ellen, daughter of Eli and Elizabeth (Hall) Spears, born at Catchertown, Tahlequah District, April 3, 1855. Wade Hampton Robertson a native of McMinn County, Tennessee. A member of Company E Second Indian Home Guards. He was killed in a skirmish at Tahlequah on March 28, 1863, originally buried in the Cherokee Capitol square but later removed to the city cemetery. Arthur Evans Robertson was elected County Judge of Cherokee County, November 2,...

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Montgomery Co., Ky

MONTGOMERY CO. (Gladys Robertson) In this community most of the slaves were kept on farms and each family was given a well constructed log house. They were fed by provisions given them by their white masters and they were plentiful. They were clothed by their masters. These clothes were made by the colored women under the direction and supervision of their mistress, the white woman cut the clothes for both men and women, and the colored women did the sewing of the garments. The men did the manual labor on the farm and the women the domestic. Each white woman and girl had a special servant for her own use and care and each white man had his colored man or valet. There are no records of a big slave trade in this county. When a slave was sold it was usually to a friend or neighbor and most masters were very considerate and would not sell unless a family could go together. For instance from the diary of Mrs. Wliza[TR: Eliza?] Magowan 1853-1871, we read this: “Lina and two children Scott and Dulcina sold to J. Wilkerson.” Also another item: “Violet married to Dennie” showing that care was taken that marriages were made among the negroes. The darkies had suppers in their own quarters and had much merrymaking and laughter. Illness among the darkies were cared from among...

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Slave Narrative of Jim Allen

Interviewer: Mrs. Ed Joiner Person Interviewed: Jim Allen Location: West Point, Mississippi Age: 87 Jim Allen, West Point, age 87, lives in a shack furnished by the city. With him lives his second wife, a much older woman. Both he and his wife have a reputation for being “queer” and do not welcome outside visitors. However, he readily gave an interview and seemed most willing to relate the story of his life. “Yas, ma’m, I ‘members lots about slav’ry time, ’cause I was old ‘nough. “I was born in Russell County, Alabamy, an’ can tell you ’bout my own mammy an’ pappy an’ sisters an’ brudders. “Mammy’s name was Darkis an’ her Marster was John Bussey, a reg’lar old drunkard, an’ my pappy’s name was John Robertson an’ b’longed to Dr. Robertson, a big farmer on Tombigbee river, five miles east of Columbus. De doctor hisself lived in Columbus. “My sister Harriett and brudder John was fine fiel’ hands an’ Marster kep’ ’em in de fiel’ most of de time, tryin’ to dodge other white folks. “Den dere was Sister Vice an’ brudder George. Befo’ I could ‘member much, I ‘members Lee King had a saloon close to Bob Allen’s store in Russell County, Alabama, and Marse John Bussey drunk my mammy up. I means by dat, Lee King tuk her an’ my brudder George fer a whiskey debt....

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Slave Narrative of Jane Wilson

Interviewer: G. Leland Summer Person Interviewed: Jane Wilson Date of Interview: June 9, 1937 Location: Newberry, South Carolina Age: 77 “I am daughter of Billy Robertson and Louisa Robertson; was born about 77 years ago in Newberry, on Marse Job Johnstone’s place. My father lived with Judge Job Johnstone as his extra man or servant. He lived in the house with him, slept in his room and waited on him when he became old; and, too, was the driver of his carriage. He drove him to other courthouses to hold court. After the war, my father was janitor at Newberry College, and he was liked by professors, students, and everybody who knew him as ‘Uncle Billy’. At commencement, he always made a speech at night on the campus, which the students enjoyed. He told about his travels from Virginia to Newberry before the war. Judge Johnstone never wanted anybody else to be with him when he traveled. “I belonged to the Avelleigh Presbyterian Church in Newberry, and was christened in the church by the preacher, the Rev. Buist. Colored people were allowed to be members and set in the gallery when they went to church. “After the war, a colored man named Amos Baxter was killed by the Ku Klux at the old courthouse. My father was on Judge Johnstone’s farm a few miles away. He was sent for...

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Slave Narrative of Alexander Robertson

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Alexander Robertson Location: White Oak, South Carolina Age: 84 Ex-Slave 84 Years Old Alexander Robertson lives as a member of the household of his son, Charley, on the General Bratton plantation, four miles southeast of White Oak, S.C. It is a box-like house, chimney in the center, four rooms, a porch in front and morning glory vines, in bloom at this season, climbing around the sides and supports. Does Alexander sit here in the autumn sunshine and while the hours away? Nay, in fact he is still one of the active, working members of the family, ever in the fields with his grandchildren, poke around his neck, extracting fleecy cotton from the bolls and putting it deftly into the poke. He can carry his row equally as well as any of the six grandchildren. He has a good appetite at meal time, digestive organs good, sleeps well, and is the early riser in the mornings. He says the Negro half of his nature objects to working on Saturday afternoon, and at such times his tall figure, with a green patch cloth over the left eye, which is sightless, may be seen strolling to and fro on the streets of Winnsboro. “Well, well! If it ain’t de youngun dat use to sell me sugar, coffee, fat back and meal, when he clerk for Calvin...

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Slave Narrative of Harriett Robinson

Person Interviewed: Harriet Robinson Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Bastrop, Texas Date of Birth: September 1, 1842 Age: 95 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph Vann bought him, so he never did learn to talk much Cherokee. My mammy was a Cherokee slave, and talked it good. My husband was a Cherokee born Negro, too, and when he got mad he forgit all the English he knowed. Old Master Joe had a mighty big farm and several families of Negroes, and he was a powerful rich man. Pappy’s name was Kalet Vann, and mammy’s name was Sally. My brothers was name Sone and Frank. I had one brother and one sister sold when I was little and I don’t remember the names. My other sisters was Polly, Ruth and Liddie. I had to work in the kitchen when I was a gal, and they was ten or twelve children smaller than me for me...

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Slave Narrative of Betty Robertson

Person Interviewed: Betty Robertson Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Age: 93 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph Vann bought him, so he never did learn to talk much Cherokee. My mammy was a Cherokee slave, and talked it good. My husband was a Cherokee born Negro, too, and when he got mad he forgit all the English he knowed. Old Master Joe had a mighty big farm and several families of Negroes, and he was a powerful rich man. Pappy’s name was Kalet Vann, and mammy’s name was Sally. My brothers was name Sone and Frank. I had one brother and one sister sold when I was little and I don’t remember the names. My other sisters was Polly, Ruth and Liddie. I had to work in the kitchen when I was a gal, and they was ten or twelve children smaller than me for me to look after, too. Sometime Young Master Joe and the other...

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Slave Narrative of Isabell Henderson

Interviewer: Mrs. Edith S. Hibbs Person Interviewed: Isabell Henderson Location: 1121 Rankin St., Wilmington, North Carolina Age: 83-84 Story Of Isabell Henderson, Negro I’ll be 84 years old come August 9. My gran’-daughter can tell you what year it was I was born I don’ ‘member but we has it down in the Bible. I lived near the “Clock Church” (Jewish Synagogue)[8], 4th and Market. We had a big place there. My gran’mother did the cookin’. My mother did the sewin’. I was jus five years old when the men went away. I guess to the war, I don’ know. Some men came by and conscip’ dem. I don’ know where they went but I guess dey went to war. I was such a little girl I don’t ‘member much. But I does know my Missus was good to me. I used to play with her little boy. I was jes’ one of the family. I played with the little boy around the house’ cause I was never ‘lowed to run the streets. They was good to me. They kept me in clothes, pretty clothes, and good things to eat. Yes’m we was slaves but we had good times. Interviewer: “What did you eat?” Isabell: “Oh I don’t ‘member ‘special but I et jes what the family et.” Maybe my father was killed in the war maybe he run...

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Biography of David Robertson, M.D., M.P.P.

David Robertson, the leading physician and surgeon in Milton, and a member of the Ontario Legislature for Halton, is a native of this county, and was born in the Township of Esquesing, July 9, 1841. His father, Alexander Robertson, was from Perthshire, Scotland; his mother, whose maiden name was Nancy Moore, from New England. The father of our subject, born in Perthshire, 1785, was the grandson of Colonel Donald Robertson, of Woodshiel, who commanded the Clan Robertson at the battle of Culloden, April 16, 1746, in which he was severely wounded. On recovering he made his escape to France, and saved his head but lost his property. Prince Charles thought so highly of him that he procured a Colonel’s commission for him in the French Army, in which he served for more than a quarter of a century. While in that country he married a French lady, greatgrandmother to our subject. Alexander Robertson entered the British Army when quite young, and obtained an officer’s commission, serving in the Peninsular war, where he was so seriously wounded that he was obliged to retire from the service. After a few years’ residence in the West Indies, he came to Canada and settled in Esquesing in the County of Halton, among the pioneers in this locality. At first he followed surveying and school teaching, and subsequently farming, and was one of the...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel Robertson

Samuel Robertson, banker, is a native of Glasgow, Scotland, dating his birth, March 31, 1831. His father, James Robertson, was a weaver in that city, and his grandfather had to flee from Scotland to Ireland at one time on account of political troubles. The mother of Samuel was Marion Harvie, also Scotch. In May, 1841, the family came to Upper Canada, and our subject went on the farm of Henry Widdefield, three miles from Newmarket, where he spent between one and two years, doing chores, and attending school three months; spent two and a half years in the village of Newmarket as an apprentice in a woolen factory; then entered the store of M. P. Empey (then warden of North York), in the same village, and was with him until 1848, when he removed to Toronto. After clerking in that city a few months, Mr. Robertson went to Schomberg, in the same county, clerked there three years, then became a partner of Asa Moore, of the same place, and one year later came to Hollen, township of Maryborough, in the county of. Wellington, where he was in the mercantile trade for fifteen years. The health of Mr. Robertson failing at the end of that period, he deemed it best to have a change, and more out door exercise, he therefore moved on a farm which he owned at Hollen,...

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