Surname: Riley

The Descendants of Franklin Mary Noyes Rowe of Humboldt County, Iowa

Franklin Rowe, son of Lucy Stillwell and Lucian Rowe, was born in Onondaga County, New York, possibly at Manlius as his parents were married there March 16, 1826. Franklin was the youngest and eighth child, born December 30, 1836. He was the grandson of Ebenezer and Mary Rowe, his grandfather was born in 1772 and died February 16, 1828 and is buried in Christ Church cemetery at Manlius, New York, his name is in the 1820 census but not in that of 1810 so he must have come to Onondaga County between those dates but diligent search has not been rewarded with further information regarding the lineage of Franklin Rowe. He had the following brothers and sisters, whose names may not be given in order of birth: Elihu, Thaddeus, Charlotte, Caroline, Mary, Martha, and Lucy.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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A History of Interlaken New York Newspapers

The following information is an attempt to provide details into not only the history of the 8 Interlaken New York newspapers, but also the sources available online and offline for the genealogist and historian to access the newspapers, or transcriptions therefrom. Newspapers remain a vital source of material for genealogists. They often provide vivid insight into the lives of our ancestors unlike other factual records.

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