Surname: Riley

Colonel Dodge Reaches Villages of Western Indians

Trailing through broad and verdant valleys, they went, their progress often arrested by hundreds of acres of plum trees bending to the ground with tempting fruit; crossing oak ridges where the ground was covered with loaded grapevines, through suffocating creek-bottom thickets, undergrowth of vines and briars, laboring up rocky hillsides and laboring down again, the horses picking their way through impeding rocks and boulders, until on the twenty-ninth of the month, two hundred miles from Fort Gibson, General Leavenworth and his staff reached Captain Dean’s camp, a mile or two from the Washita, where there were quartered two companies of the Third Infantry from Fort Towson. Reports of sickness among the men were alarming. They were dying daily, and failure of the expedition was threatened. General Leavenworth, who had intended to send the command on from the Washita in charge of Colonel Dodge, announced that he himself would proceed in charge to the Wichita country. It was not until the first day of July that the regiment came dragging into camp with forty-five men and three officers ill from exposure, the surgeon said, brought on by marching through the heat of the day. A contributing cause was the strange diet to which these untrained, undisciplined men gave themselves, and the sudden and intemperate indulgence of their appetite in abundant buffalo meat. On arrival at the Washita, seventy-five horses and...

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Greeley Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Adair, C. W. Wf. Bertha; ch. Florence, Maxine, Don. P. O. Exira, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 24. (37.) Anderson, E. H. Wf. Christina; ch. Russell. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. R. 153.91 ac., sec. 5. (20.) Owner, J. F. Mortinson. Artist, Dan’l. Wf. Sarah; ch. Ada, Sadie, George, John, Elmer, Anna, Clara, Madge, Robert. P. O. Exira, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 2.5; O. 40 ac., sec. 36. Artist, John H. Wf. Mamie; ch. Homer, Hugh, Helen,...

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A History of Waterloo New York Newspapers

The pioneer printer of Seneca County was George Lewis, who, in the year 1815, started in the village of Ovid a small sheet entitled the Seneca Patriot. The office of publication was located on Seneca Street, in the upper story of a building on whose site the engine-house now stands. At the close of a single volume, Mr. Lewis changed the name of his paper to The Ovid Gazette, and when Elisha Williams secured the removal of the County seat to Waterloo, Lewis removed hither with his press in May, 1817, and continued the issue of his paper as...

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A History of Interlaken New York Newspapers

The following information is an attempt to provide details into not only the history of the 8 Interlaken New York newspapers, but also the sources available online and offline for the genealogist and historian to access the newspapers, or transcriptions therefrom. Newspapers remain a vital source of material for genealogists. They often provide vivid insight into the lives of our ancestors unlike other factual records.

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Murdock Family of Norwich Vermont

Hon. Thomas Murdock removed to Norwich from Preston, Connecticut, as early as 1767 (in which year he was recorded a voter in town), and located on the farm a little north of Norwich Plain and subsequently occupied by Jared Goodell, George Blanchard, Harvey Knights, and now by Judd Leonard. He married Elizabeth Hatch (sister of John and Joseph Hatch, early settlers in Norwich), to whom were born: Asahel, Constant, Jasper, Thomas, Jr., Anna, who became the wife of Ebenezer Brown, Esq., the first lawyer to locate in Norwich, and Margaret, who married Elisha Partridge, November 14, 1765. Mr. Murdock was prominent in both state and local matters, the offices held by him being noticed in other chapters of this book. He died Dec. 5, 1803, followed by his wife in 1814. Asahel, the eldest son, was a voter in Norwich as early as 1782. He married Elizabeth Starkweather in 1779, and they became the parents of six children. He returned to Connecticut in 1800. Constant was a voter in Norwich as early as 1784. By his first wife, Sarah Jewett, he had one child, and by his second wife, Lucy Riley, he had eight children. His home was in the fine residence now occupied by Albert Davis, on the hill a little north of Norwich village. He died in Norwich in 1828, aged 67 years. His first wife died...

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Coal County Oklahoma Cemeteries

Most of these Coal County Oklahoma cemeteries are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we provide the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Coal County OKGenWeb Archives Byrd’s Prairie Cemetery Cairo Cemetery Centrahoma Cemetery Coalgate Cemetery Globe Cemetery McCarty Cemetery Pine Cemetery Pleasant Grove Cemetery Hosted at Coal County OKGenWeb Byrds Prairie Cemetery Centrahoma Cemetery Coalgate Cemetery Lonestar Cemetery McCarty Cemetery Moore Cemetery Ninas Cemetery Nixon Cemetery Panther Creek Cemetery Plesant Grove Cemetery Wilson Cemetery Woodman Cemetery Hosted at Coal County Oklahoma ALHN Boiling Springs Cemetery Byrds Prairie Cemetery Cairo Cemetery...

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Postmasters and Postal Service in Norwich Vermont

It was fifteen years after the admission of Vermont into the Federal Union, and forty years after the settlement of the town, before Norwich had a post office. The first post office was established at Norwich Plain, July 1, 1805, and Jacob Burton was appointed postmaster. Postmaster Burton kept the office in his harness shop on the main street of the village, nearly opposite the present residence of Mrs. William E. Lewis. Probably the duties of the office were not so great as to interfere much with the prosecution of his trade. It is doubtful if Mr. Burton had...

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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that...

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Genealogy of the Cherokee Riley Family

Instructions on how to interpret this information 11 Samuel Riley. Gu-lu-sti-yu and Ni-go-di-ge-yu        |A55 1112 Nannie Riley. John McNary 2 Richard Riley. Diana Campbell 3 Mary Riley. Samuel Keys 4 Elizabeth Riley. Isaac Keys 5 John Riley. Susan Walker 6 Nellie Riley. Charles Coody 7 Sallie Riley. William Keys 8 Lucy Riley. Owen Brady 9 Louisa Riley. Dennis Biggs 10 Loony Riley. Rachel Stuart 11 Rachel Riley. Daniel Milton and James McDaniel _______ 12 James Riley. Jennie Shields and 13 Catherine Riley. Andrew Lacey 14 Martha Riley. John Hall 15 Madison Riley* 16 Nelson Riley. Elizabeth Thompson and Mary Cordell nee 111213 Margaret McNary. James Thompson 112213 Jennie Riley. David Carter                                       |A45 OK 2 Elizabeth Riley. Wright Romine and Jacob Bushyhead 113213 Anariah Keys. Benjamin Price 2 Richard Keys. Mary A. Hayes OK 5 Evaline Keys. Theodore McCoy 4 Samuel Riley Keys. Mary Easter Hanna 5 James Madison Keys. Mary Etta Smith 6 Mary Keys. Stephen Bruner 114213 Nannie Keys. Thomas Bertholf 2 Riley Keys. Eliza Gunter, Esther Lee and Minerva Nave 3 Leroy Keys. Jennie Gunter and Nannie Melton 4 Letitia Keys. Edward Gunter and Jackson Tyner 5 Lydia Keys* John King | 6 George Washington Keys* | 7 Thomas Jefferson Keys* A55. Samuel Riley, a White man, married Gu-lu-sti-yu and Ni-go-di-geyu. They were sisters and belonged to the Long Hair clan. A45. David Carter born in 1807....

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