Surname: Richardson

A History of Swan’s Island, Maine

Upon the very threshold of this historical sketch we find ourselves quite destitute of early public records for Swan’s Island. For over half a century from the settlement of this island until its organization as a plantation no municipal records were kept. But we are fortunate that H. W. Small saw purpose in bringing to light many private family records, old deeds showing what lots were occupied by the pioneer settlers; and written mutual agreements, which seem to have been often the result of arbitration on any disputed point where different claims to land conflicted with one another.

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1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to...

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History of the Methodist Church at Norwich Vermont

Prior to the year 1800, Methodism had scarcely gained a foothold in Vermont. The first Methodist society in the State is said to have been formed at Vershire by Nicholas Suethen in 1796. Two years later, only one hundred church members were returned as residents in the Vershire Circuit, then including the whole of eastern Vermont. Zadock Thompson, in the first edition of his Gazetteer of Vermont, published in 1824, gives the number of preachers, traveling and local, at that time as about one hundred, and the number of societies much greater. Probably no religious body ever made so...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Biography of Amos Richardson

Amos Richardson, an influential resident of Cornish, was born here, November 27, 1817, son of Amos and Sophia (Cummings) Richardson. He is a descendant of Dr. Amos Richardson, who was a physician of note in Pelham, N.H. Dr. Amos’s son, Joseph, was grandfather of the subject of this sketch. Joseph’s children were: Miriam, Joseph, David, Josiah, Sarah, Mercy, Rebecca, and Amos. Miriam, now deceased, was the wife of Joshua Wyman, of Pelham, and the mother of seven children; Joseph married Polly Hilliard, of Cornish, and had a family of twelve children; David, now deceased, married Sarah Ford, and was the father of seven children; Josiah, who was unmarried, is deceased; Sarah married John Huggins, and is now deceased; Mercy, who married Aaron Hibbard, had no children, and is now deceased; Rebecca, who never married, lived to be eighty-two years of age. Amos Richardson, Sr., a native of Pelham, born in November, 1785, moved to Cornish with his parents when only four years of age. After finishing his education, which was obtained in the town schools, he went to Massachusetts; but after a while, at the urgent request of his parents, he came back to carry on the farm, the present homestead of his son. He was very prominent in the town, and was much interested in town affairs. He was Tax Collector for a number of years, also Selectman;...

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Biography of Oscar F. Richardson

Oscar F. Richardson, a wellknown citizen of Concord, was born at Southbridge, Vt., January 2, 1835, son of Hazen and Zilby (Whitcomb) Richardson. Hazen Richardson was a native of the State of New Hampshire, and was a carpenter by trade. He removed to Whitehall, N.Y., quite early in life, and passed most of his 1860, at the age of about seventy years. He and his wife, Zilby Whitcomb Richardson, had eight children; namely, Delilah, Dequesna, Lillian, Cornelia, Oscar F., Henrietta, Jeffers O., and Alice, of whom Delilah, Dequesna, Lillian, Jeffers O., and Alice are now deceased. Oscar F. Richardson, after being educated in the district schools of Stockbridge, Vt., first found employment in the woollen-mills of that town, where he continued for the next five years. He then went to Massachusetts, where he remained for about two years. At the end of that time he came to Concord, to take charge of the finishing-rooms in the mills of Messrs. B. F. & D. Holden, which have since been incorporated as the Concord Manufacturing Company; and he remained in their employ some seven years. He was subsequently appointed a station agent for the C. & C. Railroad, which position he held for more than six years. He was then employed at the Concord Water Works at West Concord, and was also appointed superintendent of Penacook Park. He was also connected...

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Biography of Hon. Samuel A. Richardson

Samuel A. Richardson was born in Anderson county, Kentucky, July 26, 1826. He was the second son of Colonel John C. Richardson, who was a native of Virginia, but in early life moved from that State to Anderson county, Kentucky, and in the spring of 1831, with his family, moved to Missouri and settled in the Missouri River bottom, above Camden, in Ray county, and afterwards removed to near Lexington. The family are descendants of the numerous family of Richardsons, from Virginia and Kentucky. Judge Nathaniel Richardson, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, moved from Kentucky and settled in Lewis county, this State; and Samuel Arbuckle, grandfather on his mother’s side, also moved from Kentucky to Missouri at an early day and located in Ray county. They both lived to an advanced age and left large families in their respective localities. Samuel A. Richardson was a robust, healthy boy, inured to all the hard-ships of frontier life, and with his elder brothers and the assistance of four negro boys, helped his father in opening up and improving three farms in the Missouri bottoms. He became proficient as a prairie-breaker and ox-driver, and broke hemp, split rails, and was especially fond of hunting. Up to his fifteenth or sixteenth year he attended school but little, his father needing his assistance. Afterward he attended the Richmond, Missouri, high school, and...

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Biography of Alfred Richardson

MARTIN CO. (Cullen Jude) In the year 1864, during the conflict between the North and South, a new citizen was added to the town of Warfield. His name was Alfred Richardson, a colored man. Heretofore the people would not permit negroes to live in Warfield. Richardson was in a skirmish at Warfield and was listed among the northern people as missing. His leg was injured and he was in a serious condition. The good people living at Warfield had their sympathies stirred up by his condition and took him in and gave him food and medical attention until he was able to work. At first the people thought they had done a Samaritan Act, but as soon as Alf had a chance to prove himself, he was considered a blessing and not a curse. He became the paper hanger for the town. Then someone wanted to have his hair cut and Alf proved to be an excellent barber. He rented a shop and went into the barber business and made a success. He owned considerable land, and other property when he died. He lived and died at Warfield Kentucky, and was considered one of its most up to date...

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1867 Plymouth County Massachusetts Directory, Oil and Candle Manufacturers to Pump Makers

Oil and Candle Manufacturers  Judd L. S., Marion Organ Manufacturers Reynolds P., N. Bridgewater Marston A. B. Campello, Bridgewater Oysters and Refreshments (See Eating Houses) Nash J. E. Abington Douglas W. East Abington Gilman A. N., Bridgewater Fuller John, Bridgewater Hull J. C., Bridgewater Tripp B. F., Middleboro Union Saloon, Middleboro Grover R. B., No. Bridgewater Washburn and Richardson, No. Bridgewater Ballard S. D., Plymouth Dodge J. E., Plymouth Painters Carriage  Peirce Wm. M., Abington Ford B. F. East Abington Bates Asa, South Abington Hersey David A. Hingham Sprague Joseph T., Hingham Eldridge David, Kingston Boomer B. L., Middleboro Southworth Rodney E., Middleboro Sparrow J. G., North Bridge water Jones John B., North Bridge water Sargent Samuel, Bridge water Thomas William E., Bridge water Jones Charles L., Plymouth Young Charles, Scituate Young Edw., Scituate Painters (House and Sign) Davis W. H.. Abington French Joseph, Abington Ford B. F., East Abington Gilson L. C., East Abington Lawrence Thomas R., East Abington Lincoln S. B., North Abington Harding J. S., South Abington Beed Philip, South Abington Alden James S., Bridgewater Braman H. F. & J. G., Bridgewater Chandler Alden, Duxbury Hathaway Joshua W., Duxbury Sampson Alfred, Duxbury Grow & Wentworth, East Bridgewater Bonney E. P., Halifax Cook John, Halifax Bailey Melzer, Hanover Bryant Snow, Hanover Corbin Frank, Hanover Eells John P., Hanover Sturtevant George, Hanover Roberts John C., Hanson Cobb David, Hingham Cross and...

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Slave Narrative of Candus Richardson

Interviewer: Harry Jackson Person Interviewed: Candus Richardson Location: Indiana Place of Residence: 2710 Boulevard Place Age: 90 Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Harry Jackson EX SLAVE STORY MRS. CANDUS RICHARDSON [HW: Personal Interview] Mrs. Candus Richardson, of 2710 Boulevard Place, was 18 years of age when the Civil War was over. She was borned a slave on Jim Scott’s plantation on the “Homer Chitter river” in Franklin county, Mississippi. Scott was the heir of “Old Jake Scott”. “Old Jim Scott” had about fifty slaves, who raised crops, cotton, tobacco, and hogs. Candus cooked for Scott and his wife, Miss Elizabeth. They were both cruel, according to Mrs. Richardson. She said that at one time her Master struck her over the head with the butt end of a cowhide, that made a hole in her head, the scar of which she still carries. He struck her down because he caught her giving a hungry slave something to eat at the back door of the “big house”. The “big house” was Scott’s house. Scott beat her husband a lot of times because he caught him praying. But “beatings didn’t stop my husband from praying. He just kept on praying. He’d steal off to the woods and pray, but he prayed so loud that anybody close around could hear, ’cause he had such a loud voice. I...

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Slave Narrative of Martha Richardson

Interviewer: Stiles M. Scruggs Person Interviewed: Martha Richardson Location: Columbia, South Carolina Place of Residence: 924 Senate Street, Columbia, SC Date of Birth: 1860 Martha Richardson, who tells this story, lives at 924 Senate Street, Columbia, S.C. Her father was an Indian and her mother a mulatto. She was born in Columbia in 1860 and was five years old, when General W.T. Sherman’s Federal troops captured and burned the city in 1865. “When I gits big ‘nough to pick up chips for de cook stove, we was livin’ in de rear of Daniel Gardner’s home, on Main Street, and my mammy was workin’ as one of de cooks at de Columbia Hotel. De hotel was run by Master Lowrance, where de Lorick & Lowrance store is now. “My daddy, like de general run of Indians, love to hunt but de game not bring much cash in. My mammy often give him some change (money) and he not work much but he always good to mammy and she love him and not fuss at him, much. I soon learn dat if it had not been for mammy, we wouldn’t a had much to eat and wear. We go ‘long lak dat for a good while and my mammy have friends ‘nough dat she seldom had to ask for a job. “De game was so scarce dat my daddy sometimes make...

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