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Surname: Rice

Biography of Danford Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Danford Rice, late a well-known farmer of Claremont, who died August 4, 1877, was born in this town, December 2, 1805. His grandfather, Ebenezer Rice, who was one of the earliest settlers of Claremont, coming with a little colony of pioneers from Tolland, Conn., bought considerable land in the village, but afterward removed to West Claremont. He was a carpenter by trade, and framed the old Union church at West Claremont. He was a Deacon of the church, and in the absence of a minister he used to read the services. A stanch patriot, he fought for American independence in the Revolution. His death occurred April 24, 1829. His children were: Joseph; Stephen; Ebenezer; and Phebe, who became Mrs. Timothy Grannis. His son Joseph was a prosperous farmer, a man of influence in the town, and one of the leading members of the Union Church. He married Lucy Barron, who was born June 14, 1772. He died April 24, 1829, his wife surviving him until August 28, 1847. They had a large family of children. Minerva, the eldest, born November 30, 1795, married Daniel Bond. Horace was born July 2, 1801. He died in Cambridge, Mass., in 1872. Franklin was born May 2, 1803; and Sanford and Danford, twins, were born December 2, 1805. Sanford was...

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Biography of William B. Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William B. Rice was a revolutionary soldier. Previous to his enlistment in the army he accompanied Daniel Boone on one of his expeditions to Kentucky. He married Rebecca Arlington, by whom he had David, William G., Benjamin, Samuel, Callier, and Sophia. Mr. Rice settled in Montgomery County in 1825, and died in his 95th year. His eldest son, David, married Elizabeth Henderson, by whom he had a daughter named Louisa, who married Judge William G. Shackelford, son of John Shackelford, of Virginia. The Judge was left an orphan at four years of age, and was raised by his uncle, Samuel Lawrence, who educated him for a lawyer. He came to Montgomery County in 1835, where he lost his wife, by whom he had six children. He afterward married Anna Rice, daughter of William G. Rice, by whom he had six other children. Judge Shackelford was Judge of the County Court of Montgomery County for twenty-one years. He was a successful farmer, also, but never had a cart or wagon on his place. His corn and other produce were gathered in baskets and carried to the barn.William G. Rice was married first to Mary Vandiver, by whom he had three children. His second wife was Sally Vandiver, by whom he had nine children. Mr. Rice was elected...

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Biography of John H. Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John H. Rice had the distinction of having made his mark in two states of the Union of widely different tendencies–Georgia and Kansas. He was born in Greene County, Tennessee, November 14, 1825, and his father, a native of Virginia, was surveyor of the county, named for twenty-six consecutive terms. Mr. Rice commenced his higher education at Tusculum College, in his native county, of which his maternal uncle, Dr. Samuel W. Doak, was president. He was admitted to the bar in 1845 and, a few months afterward, opened an office at Cassville, Georgia. In 1855, in addition to conducting a fair legal business, he became editor of the Cassville Standard. In the following year he was elected major general of the Twelfth Division of the Georgia State Militia, as the Union candidate, and in 1857 located at Atlanta. There he founded the Franklin Printing Company, which, under his management, had become a large book publishing concern at the time of its destruction in the Civil war. Always a consistent opponent of secession, General Rice was prevented from taking part in the War of the Rebellion on account of a stroke of paralysis which he suffered in 1861. In May, 1865, he was appointed purchasing agent for the Federal cavalry forces then operating in Georgia, and served...

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Biography of Rev. Cyrus R. Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Rev. Cyrus R. Rice, of Hartford, is one of the revered fathers of the Methodist Church in Kansas. He comes of a Tennessee family, and was himself born near Lebanon, that state, August 27, 1833. His father was a physician of many years’ practice in Tennessee and Missouri. The son also studied medicine, but his decided inclinations were toward the ministry, and in 1853 he united with the St. Louis Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The next year he was licensed to preach and appointed to the Thomasville Circuit, and in 1855 was sent as a missionary to Osawatomie, Kansas. In March, 1856, he returned to Patterson, Missouri, married Lucy A. McCormick, and spent most of his bridal trip on horseback with his wife, returning to Kansas. During the succeeding three years he organized various societies along the Neoshe River, at Fort Scott and Tecumseh, and in 1859 was assigned to the Shawneetown charge, where he ministered for two years. During the Civil war the Methodist Church, South, withdrew from Kansas and Mr. Rice was without regular appointment until March, 1865, when he united with the conference of the Methodist Episeopal Church and was assigned to the congregations at Centropolis and Prairie City. In 1867 he moved to Lyon County, and was the first...

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Slave Narrative of Phillip Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Caldwell Sims Person Interviewed: Philip Rice Date of Interview: May 7, 1937 Location: Kelton, South Carolina Occupation: Drove cattle “I’m living on Mr. Russel Emmitt’s place. I never did nothing but drive cows when I was a little boy growing up. Miss Cum and Miss Lizzie Rice was Marse Alex’s sisters. Marse Alex done died, and dey was my mistress. Dey tuck and sold de plantation afo dey died, here ’bout twenty years ago. Dat whar my ma found me and den she died. “My grandparents, Jane and Peter Stevens, brung me up. I was a little farm boy and driv cows fer de overseer, Jim Blalock. Miss Cum was really Miss Ann. Miss Ann had a hundred niggers, herself, and Miss Lizzie had might nigh dat many, asides dem what Marse Alex done left ’em. De overseer try to act rough out o’ Miss Ann’s sight, and she find it out and set him down a peg. “Miss Jane have our shirts made on de looms. She let us wear long shirts and go in our shirt tails, and us had to keep ’em clean, too, ’cause Miss Jane never like no dirt around her. Miss Jane have charge of de whole house and everything along wid it. “Us had three hundred hogs to...

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Slave Narrative of Jesse Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Caldwell Sims Person Interviewed: Jesse Rice Date of Interview: January 8, 1938 Location: Gaffney, South Carolina Stories From Ex-Slaves “My people tells me a lot about when I was a lil’ wee boy. I has a clear mind and I allus has had one. My folks did not talk up people’s age like folks do dese days. Every place dat I be now, ‘specially round dese government folks, first thing dat dey wants to know is your name. Well, dat is quite natu’al, but de very next question is how old you is. I don’t know, why it is, but dey sho do dat. As my folks never talked age, it never worried me till jes’ here of late. So dey says to me dat last week I give one age to de man, and now I gives another. Soon I see’d dat and I had to rest my mind on dat as well as de mind of de government folks. So I settled it at 80 years old. Dat gives me respect from everybody dat I sees. Den it is de truth, too, kaise I come along wid everybody dat is done gone and died now. De few white folks what I was contemperment (contemporary) wid, ‘lows dat I is 80 and dey is...

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Slave Narrative of Anne Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: G. Leland Summer Person Interviewed: Anne Rice Location: Newberry, South Carolina Place of Birth: Spartanburg County, SC Folk-Lore: Ex-Slaves “I was born in Spartanburg County, S.C., near Glenn Springs. I can’t ‘member slavery or de war, but my ma and pa who was Green Foster and his wife, Mary Posey Foster, always said I was a big gal when the war stopped, when freedom come. “We belonged to Seth Posey who had a big farm there. He was a good man, but sure made us work. I worked in the fields when I was small, hoed and picked cotton, hoed corn. They didn’t give us no money for it. All we got was a place to sleep and a little to eat. The big man had a good garden and give us something from it. He raised loads of hogs, to eat and to sell. He sold lots of them. The young fellows hunted rabbits, possums, squirrels, wild turkeys, partridges, doves, and went fishing. The Master’s wife, Miss Nancy, was good to us. She had one son, William. “Yes, I ‘member my ma telling us ’bout the padder-rollers. They would ride around, whipping niggers. “My ma said her step-mother sold her. Sometimes they would take crowds of slaves to Mississippi, taking away mothers from their...

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Biographical Sketch of John M. Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now JOHN M. RICE, farmer and miller, was born in 1845, in Muhlenberg County, Ky. His parents, M. M. and S. A. Rice, were born in Kentucky. The father is a farmer, living in Muhlenburg County, at the age of sixty-six years. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The mother died in 1872, at the age of forty-five years. She also was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. These parents had four boys and five girls, eight of whom are now living and members of the church. Our subject on arriving at majority, began for him-self at farming. He still continues in that business. He sold goods for himself in Kirkmansville for two years. He farmed in Texas in 1879-80, making two crops of cotton, corn and wheat. He went to Texas more especially on account of health. On regaining that he returned and has been running his mill and farm ever since. He has been quite successful in business. He now owns 100 acres of land, besides a town residence and mill property. He has been very successful and has an encouraging outlook. He was married October, 1866, to Miss Mary A. Butler of this county. Benjamin B., John H. and Eura are their children. Both parents and two children are members...

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Biographical Sketch of Abel Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Abel, son of Adonijah, settled in town; died July, 1800, aged forty-nine years. His three sons were Jonas, Joel and Asa. Jonas became owner of the farm where his grandfather Adonijah lived from 1786 to the time of his death. Joel, the next son, was a popular physician many years in town; represented the town many times, also a senator of Addison county. He moved West late in life and died at Madison, Wis. Asa, third son, is now living at the age of eighty-eight years. He always lived at the home where his father lived and died, his son, Jonas R. Rice, living with him. Abel H. Rice owns and lives at the home his father, Jonas, and his great-grandfather, Adonijah, lived and died...

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Biographical Sketch of Adonijah Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Adonijah Rice, who was claimed the first white male child born in the town of Worcester, Mass., was one of the sixty-four original proprietors of Bridport who received rights of land according to charter, and it is claimed was the only one of the above grantees who passed their last days in town. On a stone in the village cemetery reads, “Adonijah Rice died January 20, 1802, aged eighty-eight...

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Biographical Sketch of Beebe T. Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Rice, Beebe T., Cornwall, was born in Bridport, Addison county, Vt., on January 27, 1836, and is the youngest living son of Asa and Elizabeth (Turrell) Rice. He was educated in the common schools of Addison and the academy at Shoreham, and had fitted himself for and entered Middlebury College, when ill health compelled him to leave school. He taught school at Bridport and Shoreham, Vt., for several terms, and in the spring of 1857 he went to Minnesota and remained West most of the time till the fall of 1869. He was married on February 7, 1870, to Mara J. Allen, of Bridport. After marriage they again went West and settled in Kansas on a farm of 160 acres. They had one daughter born to them — CarrieE., born on November 17, 1871. Mrs. Rice died in the summer of 1873, and in the winter of 1875 Mr. Rice married Belle S. Merritt., of Putnam county, Ill., who died after being married one year. He then returned East, and in March, 1877, married Emma A. Johnson, a daughter of Ayres Johnson, a former well-known resident of Bridport, Vt. They have one adopted daughter and son — Lulu H. and Varney H. While in Kansas he was county commissioner of Butler county one term. On his...

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Biography of Edward N. Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Edward N. Rice, deputy superintendent at Racine for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, has been connected with the insurance business for a number of years. He was born in Kenosha June 11, 1876, a son of Nicholas and Nellie (Keenen) Rice, the latter also a native of Kenosha. The father was born in County Down, Ireland, and came to the United States in 1855, the year before James Buchanan was elected president. He settled in Kenosha, where he still makes his home, and he is now eighty-six years of age, his birth having occurred in August, 1830. His wife passed away in March, 1912. Edward N. Rice attended the schools of Kenosha but is largely self-educated, as he early started out to earn his living, but in the school of experience he has learned many valuable lessons. He was at first employed at the Allen tannery of Kenosha, with which he was connected for three years, and subsequently he spent six months with the Ringling Brothers circus as candy butcher. He afterward went to work for a portrait house to enlarge family portraits and continued in that connection for three months. He next began handling a crew for a portrait house and spent four years in that work in the central states. On the expiration of...

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Biography of Oscar Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Oscar Rice, who had lived in Fort Scott since he graduated from high school, is a typical Kansan in his enterprise and hustling business ability. For a number of years he was a traveling salesman. In 1910 he drew up the plans and promoted the organization of The Western Automobile Indemnity Association. This association is the oldest and financially the strongest mutual association writing automobile liability in America. Since the organization of the association its headquarters have been at Fort Scott and Mr. Rice had been secretary and manager. Mr. Rice was one of those to recognize this new field of insurance consequent upon the enormous development of the automobile, and it was to supply a highly specialized and exclusive service that he organized this association, which in the past six years had extended its policies to automobile owners in eight different states of the Mississippi Valley and had gained that prestige resulting from reliable protection at a moderate cost, together with a perfect fairness and reasonableness in the settling of all claims. The Western Automobile Indemnity Association was organized and is conducted solely for the purpose of furnishing insurance to owners of automobile vehicles. It is one of the few companies of the kind, and as already stated is the largest and financially the strongest....

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Biography of John Holt Rice

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Holt Rice was educated at Tusculum College in his native county. At that time his uncle, Dr. Samuel W. Doak was president of the school. In February, 1845, at the age of nineteen, John H. Rice was admitted to the bar. In the following May he located at Cassville, Georgia, where he took up an active practice. In 1855 he became editor of the Cassville Standard, carrying those responsibilities in addition to his legal practice. January 1, 1856, he was elected major general of the Twelfth Division of the Georgia State Militia. That election was important because of its bearing upon the issues then most prominent before the people in Georgia and all the South. John H. Rice was Union candidate for this office, and received a majority of 1,772 votes over Col. E. M. Gault, who was the Southern Rights candidate. The following year Major Rice removed to Rome, Georgia, where he remained a short time, and then went to Atlanta, where he founded the Franklin Printing Company. Under his able management this developed as a large book publishing concern, and it continued to grow until the war came on. During the war the plant was destroyed. The achievements of John H. Rice seems the more remarkable when it is recalled that for more...

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