Surname: Read

The Fall River Branch of the Earle Family

EARLE (Fall River family). The Fall River branch of the Earles, the family there to which this article is devoted (to some of the descendants of the late Slade Earle, of Somerset, Mass.), springs from the earlier Portsmouth (R.I.) – Swansea (Mass.) family, one of some two hundred and seventy and more years’ standing in the section named; especial attention being given to the late Hon. Lloyd Slade Earle, who was through a long lifetime one of the prominent business men and useful citizens of his adopted city, and his son, the late Andrew Brayton Earle. The former was a descendant in the eighth generation from Ralph Earle, the first American ancestor of the family, from whom his lineage is through William, Thomas, Oliver, Caleb, Weston and Slade Earle, which generations in detail and in the order given

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Descendants of Francis Brayton of Fall River, MA

BRAYTON. The first in America by this name, one Francis Brayton, came from England to Portsmouth, Rhode Island, where, in 1643, he was received as an inhabitant, in 1655, became a freeman, and to him nearly if not all the Braytons of New England trace their origin. He early entered into the political life of the country, serving as a member of the General Court of Commissioners for the Colony, for many years as member of the Rhode Island General Assembly, and frequently during the later generations his descendants have held positions of responsibility and trust in the public...

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Archer Family of Fall River, MA

ARCHER (Fall River family). Through much of the nineteenth century the name opening this article was a most highly esteemed and respected one at Fall River, made so by the lives of the late Jason H. Archer, M. D., of the medical profession, and his son, the late John Jason Archer, Esq., for years one of the learned members of the Fall River bar. The home at least for a time of this Fall River Archer family was in the nearby town of Wrentham, in Norfolk county, where lived Amos Archer, father of Dr. Jason H. Archer and grandfather of the late John Jason Archer, Esq. While the Wrentham vital records do not show the Archers among the town’s early inhabitants the Archers as a family were here in Massachusetts in its early Colonial period. One Samuel Archer (name spelled in the early Essex county records Arehard) was living in Salem as early as 1630, as on Oct, 19th of that year he took the freeman’s oath there. He was born between 1602 and 1615, and was a carpenter. He was a member of the First Church before 1636; was constable of the town in 1657; and marshal from 1654 until his decease. He died in December, 1667. His wife Susanna survived him, and married (second) Richard Hutchinson in October, 1668. His children, born in Salem, Mass., were: Hannah,...

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Read Family of Massachusetts

(I) John Read, supposed son of William and Lucy (Henage) Read, was born in 1598, and it is said came to America with the great fleet in 1630. He is of record in 1637 in Weymouth, was in Dorchester the next year, and went from there to that part of Braintree now Quincy. In 1643 or 1644 he accompanied Rev. Mr. Newman and his church society to Rehoboth, where his name appears the third on the list of purchasers of the town. He was a man of large property for those times, and held the office of constable, which...

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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Ancestors of Warren A. Reed of Brockton Massachusetts

The Reed family of Brockton, Mass., a leading member of which was Judge Warren A. Reed, lawyer and jurist, who for over a third of a century had been one of the foremost citizens of Brockton, and during the greater part of that long period connected with the judicial, civic and financial interests of the city, district and State, is one of long and honorable standing in this Commonwealth, and one the forerunner of which came to these shores over two hundred and fifty years ago. Many members of this historic family have given good account of themselves, and many are there who have been prominent in the history of this country. An account of the branch of the family to which Judge Reed belongs is here given in chronological order, beginning with the earliest American ancestor.

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History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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Biographical Sketch of Robert Read

Robert Read, of the Dominion Senate, is the eldest son of Robert Read, senior, in his day an extensive farmer, in the county of Suffolk, England, and was born at Fressingfield, in that county, December 11, 1814. He was educated at Laxfield, in his native county; came to Canada in 1836, settled at Belleville, and engaged in general business, tanning, distilling, and agricultural pursuits, being an extensive farmer for twenty-five or thirty years; he has been a director of the Grand Trunk railway, and is one of the most energetic business men of that part of the Province of Ontario. His business now is agriculture. Mr. Read sat for “Quinte” division in the Legislative Council of Canada from October, 1862, until the union in 1867. He represented East Hastings in the House of Commons, from the union until called to the Senate, February 24, 1871, his politics being Conservative. In 1876 he moved the first resolution affirming the national policy, and in 1877 he introduced the Bill, prohibiting the carrying concealed fire arms on the person, a measure carried through by Mr. Blake. July 2, 1840, Mr. Read was married, at Montreal, to Miss Margaret Campion, and they have had six children, three of them now living. Adelaide Eliza is the wife of Albert Campion, of Belleville, and Caroline and Robert J. are at...

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Biographical Sketch of C. E. Read

C.E. Read, furniture dealer and undertaker, was born in March, Canada, Dec., 20th, 1826; moved to Toledo, O., in April, 1856; was engaged in the drug business four years; then moved to Huron County, Mich., where he was engaged in same business for three years. In Aug., 1865, he came to Sac City and engaged in contracting and building. He entered his present business in 1873; employs first-class cabinet-maker, and carries a fine stock of everything in his...

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Biographical Sketch of J. H. Read

J.H. Read, of the firm of J.H. Read & Co., bakers, grocers and confectioners, was born in Kendall County, Ill., in May, 1855; removed with his parents to Bureau County, and in 1868, came to Ia., and located in Cerro Gordo County; removed to Dunlap in 1878, and established his present business; has oyster and ice cream parlors in connection; has Vernon’s patent steam coffee and peanut roaster, and keeps constantly on hand new-made candies. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., and A.F. & A.M. lodges. He was married at Dunlap in Aug. 1879, to Miss...

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Read, Lu Mrs. – Obituary

The death of Mrs. Lu Read, wife of Dr. S.D. Read, of this city, occurred at the home of her parents, near Junction City, this state, at 3:40 a.m. Sept. 28. Mrs. Read had been in poor health for several weeks and in August she went down to the home of her parents in Marion county, with the hope that the change would do her good. For a time she appeared to be on the road to recovery, but soon had a relapse. Her husband went down the forepart of September and everything that medical skill and loving friends and relatives could do was of no avail and the end came Monday. The interment was in the Odd Fellows cemetery at Junction City, Tuesday after noon. Mrs. Read was a member of the Christian church and leaves a large circle of friends to mourn her untimely death and sympaathize with her husband in his sad bereavement. Elgin Recorder Friday October 2, 1903 Resolutions To Rock Wall Camp No. 700, W.O.W. Your committee on Resolutions of Condolence hereby submit the following for adoption: Silently and reverently we bow our heads in submission to the will of Prvidence in relieving of early care and suffering the late dearly beloved wife of Neighbor S.D. Read. While we believe that death is but the passing from this to a highter and better world,...

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