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Surname: Ray

Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic;...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac...

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Slave Narrative of George Morrison

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Iris Cook Person Interviewed: George Morrison Location: New Albany, Indiana Place of Residence: 25 East 5t., New Albany, Indiana Place of Birth: Union County, Kentucky Iris Cook District 4 Floyd County STORY OF GEORGE MORRISON 25 East 5th St., New Albany, Ind. Observation of the writer (This old negro, known as “Uncle George” by the neighbors, is very particular about propriety. He allows no woman in his house unless accompanied by a man. He says “It jest a’nt the proper thing to do”, but he came to a neighbors for a little talk.) “I was bawn in Union County, Kentucky, near Morganfield. My master was Mr. Ray, he made me call him Mr. Ray, wouldent let me call him Master. He said I was his little free negro.” When asked if there were many slaves on Mr. Ray’s farm, he said, “Yes’m, they was seven cabin of us. I was the oldes’ child in our family. Mr. Ray said “He didn’t want me in the tobacco”, so I stayed at the house and waited on the women folk and went after the cows when I was big enough. I carried my stick over my shoulder for I wus afraid of snakes.” “Mr. Ray was always very good to me, he liked to play with me,...

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Biographical Sketch of Byron Ray

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Ray, Byron, Monkton, Monkton Ridge p. o., was born in Hinesburg, Vt,, in 1832, and settled in Monkton, Vt., in March, 1865, as a farmer dairyman, and stock dealer and breeder of fine horses and cattle. He has been selectman of the town for three terms and lister for three terms. He now owns a fine farm of 216 acres. He was married in 1864 to Carrie V. Ferguson, a daughter of Andrew and Mary Ferguson. They have had four children born to them — Elsie L., now Mrs. H. W. Clifford; Cora, a teacher; Daniel, and Rolla. Byron Ray was a son of Daniel and Orilla (Rounds) Ray. She was born in Monkton, Vt., and he was born in Rutland, Vt. They died in Hinesburg, Vt. They were early settlers in this...

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Biography of Jasper N. Ray

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now JASPER N. RAY. Jasper N. Ray belongs to that class of American citizens who are enterprising, thoroughgoing and industrious, and who rise in a few years from a condition of dependence to one of prominence and the possession of considerable wealth. In fact, he is a self-made man in all which that much-abused term implies, and the property he has accumulated is the result of his own honest industry. He first saw the light of day in what is now Maries County, Missouri, his birth occurring in 1846, to the union of Hubbard and Vashti (Moon) Ray, the father, a native of Grainger County, Tennessee born in 1820, and the mother born near Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1826. Then young Mr. and Mrs. Ray went with their parents to what is now Phelps County, Missouri, where they grew to mature years and were married. Afterward they came to what is Maries County, Missouri, but, a few years later, moved to Greene County, where they resided for about five years. Their next move was to Barry County, where they were among the pioneers; but they only remained there about three years and returned to what is now Phelps County. From 1861 to 1865 the family resided in Arkansas, and then returned to Phelps County, where Mr. Ray died...

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Biography of Edward P. Ray

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Edward P. Ray. Fortunate is the man who finds his work in the world early in life and concentrates all his energies upon discharging his duties and responsibilities with credit and efficiency. One of this fortunate class was Edward P. Ray of Arkansas City. His father and grandfather before him were in the produce business, established one of the early concerns of that kind in Southern Michigan, and the old house is still flourishing and doing a large business at Coldwater, Michigan, today. Edward P. Ray grew up in that business atmosphere and after breaking home ties and family associations he readily found places of responsibility with other concerns. In the course of his career he came out to Kansas, and for a number of years was manager of the A. S. Kininmonth Company, a produce concern whose activities are practically state wide in Kansas. Mr. Ray was born at Coldwater, Michigan, December 1, 1875, and came of old American Colonial stock. His paternal ancestors settled in New York in the early days. His grandfather, Henry Ray, was born at Oaks Corners in Ontario County, New York, in 1823. For a number of years he was a grocer at Phelps, New York, and organized the produce business which his son, E. F. Ray, still conducts. Henry...

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A. W. Ray

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Private 1st Class, 2nd Co., 1st Corps, Artillery Park. Born in Durham County; son of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Ray. Entered service Feb. 25, 1918, at Durham, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and from there to Camp Merritt, N. J. Sailed for France May 22, 1918. Fought at Champagne, Marne defensive, Aisne-Marne offensive, Oise-Aisne offensive, Verdun, Chateau Thierry Sector, Meuse-Argonne offensive. Was with army of occupation in Germany seven months. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., Aug. 10,...

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E. C. Ray

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Btry. F, 30th Div., 318th F. A. Born in Cabarrus County. Entered service May 29, 1918, at Concord, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. Sailed for England Aug. 8, 1918. Served there until sent to France, Chaumont Sector, on his way to the front when Armistice was signed. Sailed from Brest, France, June 3, 1919. Returned to United States June 11, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 22,...

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Biography of Marvin Whitman Ray

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now MARVIN WHITMAN RAY, a member of the Durkee & Ray Corporation, of which he was one of the founders and is also the treasurer, holds a prominent position in the mercantile life of his community. He is also actively interested in all movements for the progress and general welfare of the section, and his service in civic, fraternal and other organizations has earned for him the esteem of all who come in touch with him. He is a member of an old American family, being the representative in the sixth generation in direct lineal descent of the original pioneer who came to this country and settled here. The name itself is a very ancient one, as a personal name, coming from Ra or Rae, and perhaps derived originally from rae, the Scotch form of roe, a deer. In Anglo-Saxon times, Ra, or Rae, and Ray were used as baptismal or Christian names, and the Gaelic form Mac Rae, McRae, and so forth, came into use, and the family became very numerous. Ray is the most common spelling, but Rae and Rea are still found in use. The estate of Gill, in the parish of Bromfield, County Cumberland, belonged to the family of Reay or Ray from the time of William the Lion, King of Scotland, who...

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Biographical Sketch of S. E. Ray

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now S. E. Ray, dealer in dry and fancy goods, boots and shoes, etc., Charleston; was born near Montpelier, Vt., Aug. 5, 1833; in early childhood, he accompanied his parents to Geauga Co. (now Lake), Ohio; there, his father resided until his death, and his mother still resides there; at about the age of 20 years, Mr. Ray went to La Fayette, Ind., and engaged as a traveling salesman for Luce Brothers in the stationery business; and, after remaining with them four years, went to Chicago, and for about six years traveled for the well-known stationery house of Culver, Page, Hoyne & Co., establishing the Memphis branch of that house, under the name of C. H. Chamberlain & Co., which continued until after the breaking-out of the war; in 1862, he returned to Chicago, and the following year came to Charleston and engaged in the livery business; in 1875, he disposed of his business, and engaged in merchandising. Mr. Ray was married March 31, 1863, to Miss Josephine Bunnell, of Charleston; she died Sept. 18, 1867, leaving one child-Henrietta, since deceased. He was married again Dec. 10, 1867, to Mrs. Elizabeth J. Willhoit, of Edgar Co., Ill., and has one child -Samuel A. Mr. Ray is President of the Board of Education of Charleston, of which he...

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