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Surname: Rand

Descendants of Elder Nutter of Dover, MA

The family bearing this name in East Bridgewater, whose head was the late Hon. Isaac Newton Nutter, descends from an ancient and honorable family of early New Hampshire, and is connected by marriage in later generations with a number of the old and highly respected families of Plymouth Colony, among them descendants of the “Mayflower” Pilgrims. The emigrant ancestor,

Elder Hatevil Nutter, was born in England in 1603. He was one of those of good estate and of “some account for religion” who were induced to leave England with Captain Wiggins in 1633, and to found a town in New England on Dover Neck, in New Hampshire. His wife, Annie, and son, Anthony, accompanied him. He received several grants of land, and became a large holder of real estate. He was a ruling elder in the first church at Dover, and sometimes filled its pulpit. He filled various offices in church and state, was highly respectable, and possessed of a good share of this world’s goods. He died before June 28, 1675 (when his will was proved), at the age of seventy-one years, leaving a “present wife, Ann,” and three children.

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Bolton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Bolton Massachusetts.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Exira Iowa

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Akers, Lincoln. Wf. Mary; ch. Otto, Laura, Cleo, Bryon, Trilby, Lincoln, Lilly, Vinona, Frank,Alvia, Lewis, Robert and Carol. P. O. Brayton,R. 1. O. 25 ac., sec. 21. (52.) Albertson, Lars. Wf. Hannah; ch. Harry P., Mabel C. and ArnoldN. P. O. Brayton, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 32; O. 80 ac., sec. 29. (11.) Anderson, A. F. Wf. Otilla; ch. Arthur, Vera, Edith, Max and Raymond....

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Biography of Doctor Joseph Lewis

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Doctor Lewis was the son of William and Naomi Lewis was born at Old Lyme, Connecticut, in November, 1746, and came to Norwich, Vermont, in 1767. During his minority young Lewis showed a fondness for the study of medicine and devoted much of his time during the last years previous to his leaving Connecticut to the study of that science. After settling in Norwich he devoted a year or two to further study, after which he commenced the practice of medicine and continued in practice for more than fifty-five years. During a large portion of this time (from 1785 to 1820) his practice was large, and extended not only through Norwich but into Thetford, Sharon, Hartford and Strafford in Vermont, and to Lebanon, Hanover and Lyme, New Hampshire. The larger part of this practice was performed on horseback. In the winter when the roads became impassable for horses, the doctor resorted to snow shoes, guided through the wilderness by blazed trees; always ready to do what he could to relieve the suffering and the ills of the settlers of those days. No plea of inclement weather or poor health was made in order to shirk his duty in visiting the sick. The poor and destitute were welcome to his services and none who showed a desire...

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History of the Industries of Norwich VT

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Although the products of the industries in Norwich have not been of great magnitude they have been quite varied in character. Such information in regard to these callings as we have been able to obtain we will present to our readers, though not in strict chronological order. Among the earliest establishments coming under this head was a grist mill established as early as 1770, by Hatch and Babcock on Blood Brook, on or near the site of the grist mill now operated by J. E. Willard,...

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Slave Narrative of Emma Blalock

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Emma Blalock Location: 529 Bannon Avenue, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 88 I shore do ‘member de Yankees wid dere blue uniforms wid brass buttons on ’em. I wus too small to work any but I played in de yard wid my oldes’ sister, Katie. She is dead long ago. My mother belonged to ole man John Griffith an’ I belonged to him. His plantation wus down here at Auburn in Wake County. My father wus named Edmund Rand. He belonged to Mr. Nat Rand. He lived in Auburn. De plantations wus not fur apart. Dere wus about twenty-five slaves on de plantation whur mother an’ me stayed. Marse John used ter take me on his knee an’ sing, ‘Here is de hammer, Shing ding. Gimme de Hammer, shing ding.’ Marster loved de nigger chilluns on his plantation. When de war ended father come an’ lived with us at Marse John’s plantation. Marster John Griffith named me Emmy. My grandfather on my fathers side wus named Harden Rand, an’ grandmother wus named Mason Rand. My grandfather on my mother’s side wus named Antny Griffiths an’ grandmother wus named Nellie. Our food wus a plenty and well cooked. Marster fed his niggers good. We had plenty of homespun dresses and we got...

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Biography of John S. Rand

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John S. Rand, a leading business man of Pittsfield, Merrimack County, and a member of the New Hampshire legislature, was born in Barnstead, N.H., September 14, 1855, son of Hiram and Harriet N. (Hoyt) Rand. His great-grandfather, Samuel Rand, was a native of Barnstead, and a farmer and a mechanic by occupation. The maiden name of his wife was Mary Hill. Of his four children Moses H., grandfather of John S., was the oldest. Moses H. Rand was brought up to farming, which occupation he followed in Barnstead during his active period In politics he acted with the Democratic party, and in his religious belief he was a Free Will Baptist. He lived to reach the age of over eighty years. He married Ann Bunker, a native of Barnstead; and her death occurred at about the same age as that of her husband. She reared four children, three of whom are living: Dr. Joseph B.; Hiram; and Mary, who married Isaac A. Fletcher, of Lowell, Mass. The latter’s only daughter, Anna D., married George Rogers, of that city, and has five children. Hiram Rand, John S. Rand’s father, grew to manhood in Barnstead, and has been engaged in agricultural pursuits from an early age. At the present time he owns a farm containing fifteen acres of...

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Biographical Sketch of John L. Rand

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Among the representative members of the Eastern Oregon bar the name of John L. Rand must be given a leading place. he having by virtue of natural ability and practical training attained to a position in his profession which many an older man might well be proud to occupy. Born October 28, 1861, at Portsmouth, N, H., he received his preliminary education in the public schools, and in 1879 entered Dartmouth college at Hanover, N. Il., graduating at the age of 21. In 188.3 he moved to Walla Walla,Wash., where be taught in Whitman College for two years. During this time he took up the study of law under the direction of Bon. N. T. Caton, and was admitted to the bar May 1885. He then moved to Baker City where he has practiced with signal success ever since. He is an enthusiastic republican, and was elected district attorney of the sixth judicial district in 1888 and again in 1891. He also held the position of city attorney for two years prior to this. He is a member of the Elks, Knights of Pythias, Red Men and A. O. U. W. In July, 1895, he married Miss F....

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