Surname: Putnam

Charlton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Charlton Massachusetts.

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Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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Wood Genealogy of Bluehill, Maine

Capt. Joseph Wood was an early settler in Blue Hill arriving in 1763 with some of his sons: Israel, Joseph and Robert. Across the road from the schoolhouse is the cellar over which it is said the house of which he built stood, when he removed from the island at the Fore Falls.

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Business Men of Northern Maine

The Northern Maine, its Points of Interest and its Representative Business Men manuscript provides historical sketches of the nine towns featured within it’s embrace, as well as biographical sketches of the businesses and the men and women who owned and ran those businesses found within the towns of Houlton, Presque Isle, Caribou, Ft. Fairfield, Danforth, Lincoln, Mattawamkeag, Winn, and Kingman.

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Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society

From 1860 to 1930 The Connecticut Historical Society published a series containing items from their collection of historical documents. The following are the 24 volumes of their works freely made available online. To assist the researcher with determining the contents for each volume, we’ve included such in the description. Connecticut genealogists will want to pay particular attention to Volumes 8-10, 12, 14, and 22. Willis and Wyllys family researchers, who descend from George Wyllys will be ecstatic over volume 21. And to our Native American friends, volumes 2 and 3 contain some information on early Connecticut Indians. Collections of...

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Gleanings from English Records about New England Families

The classic work often cited by more contemporaneous authors on early New England families and the records of them found within the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House, Strand, the Public Record Office, Fetter Lane, and the British Museum, Bloomsbury, while on a visit in London during the summer and fall of 1879.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Indian Mounds throughout North America

Charlevoix and Tantiboth speak of Indians who inhabited the region of country around Lake Michigan, who were well skilled in the art of erecting mounds and fortifications, Charlevoix also states that the Wyandots and the Six Nations disinterred their dead and took the bones from their graves where they had lain for several years and carried them to a large pit previously prepared, in which they deposited them, with the property of the deceased, filling up the pit with earth and erected a mound over it. A string of sleigh-bells much corroded, but still capable of tinkling, is said to have been found among...

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Captivity and Redemption of Mrs. Jemima Howe – Indian Captivities

A particular account of the captivity and redemption of Mrs. Jemima Howe, who was taken prisoner by the Indians at Hinsdale, New Hampshire, on the twenty-seventh of July, 1765, as communicated to Dr. Belknap by the Rev. Bunker Gay. As Messrs. Caleb Howe, Hilkiah Grout, and Benjamin Gaffield, who had been hoeing corn in the meadow, west of the river, were returning home, a little before sunset, to a place called Bridgman’s fort, they were fired upon by twelve Indians, who had ambushed their path. Howe was on horseback, with two young lads, his children, behind him. A ball,...

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Biographical Sketch of Harry H. Putnam

After months of travel in the United States looking for a business opening, Harry H. Putnam, contractor and builder of Redwood City, chose California as the state offering the most to the newcomer. He then spent two years deciding beyond a doubt that the peninsula offered him more opportunities than any other place in the state and that for one in his line, Redwood City was the logical place to locate. Since coming to Redwood City, Mr. Putnam has developed a large contracting and building business. He has erected 10 homes in the Redwood Highlands district alone and his contracts for houses and other structures are strung along from Redwood City to San Jose. A number of the attractive places in Stanford Park are being built by Mr. Putnam. Mr. Putnam came west after considerable experience in building and contracting lines. He was in business in Omaha for several years, where he built a number of homes. Harry H. Putnam is a native of Nebraska and was born on May 28, 1885. After graduating from the Omaha High School, he took a course at the University of Nebraska. He was married at Omaha on September 10, 1904. Mr. Putnam is a member of the Masons and the Woodmen of the World, and also a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Frat. He resides with his family at 712 Brewster...

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Biographical Sketch of P. R. Putnam

Putnam, P. R.; teaming contractor; born, Hinckley, O., June 7, 1854; son of Russell and Deborah Moody Putnam; educated, Hinckley High School; married, Cleveland, Dec. 31, 1879, Mary A. Randolph; six children; member of Astria Court, No. 64, of the Tribe of Ben Hur; also of Chapter No. 50, of the American Insurance Union, of Columbus, and the Grand Fraternity Club of...

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Putnam, Dorothy – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Dorothy Matilda “Tilly” Putnam, 88, died Sunday, June 17, 1979, in Wallowa Memorial Hospital, after a stay of four days. She had been in failing health for three or four years. Two years ago she moved from Portland to Enterprise, where she was a resident of Alpine Village. She was born on Feb. 2, 1891, in Ostrander, Minn., the daughter of Olle J. and Margaretta Hager. On June 21, 1931, she was married to Harold Douglas Putnam in Reno, Nev. He preceded her in death on July 15, 1968. A homemaker, Mrs. Putnam had been a school teacher in her younger years. She was a member of the Baptist church in St. John’s, Portland. Services were held at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, June 20, 1979, in the Bollman Chapel, with Father Leo Weckerle officiating. A duet, Ella McArtor and Melvin Crow, sang “In The Garden” and “Peace In The Valley”. Jeanette Powers was organist. Bearers were Lewis Britton, Ed Warren, and Alfred Scott, James and Alvin Elliott. Vault internment was in the Lostine Cemetery. Survivors include her sister, Mrs. Ed J. (Anna) Hook, Wallowa; stepson Harold Putnam, Alhambra, Cal.; nephew Alfred Warren Scott, Lostine; and other relatives. Source: Wallowa County Chieftain, Thurs, June 21, 1979 Page 12 Contributed by: Sue...

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