Surname: Proctor

Flint Family of Fall River, MA

JOHN DEXTER FLINT (deceased), merchant, trader, philanthropist and churchman, of Fall River, was in many ways a most remarkable man, one that perhaps crowded more into his three-score years of active business life in the city of his adoption than any of his contemporaries; among the foremost leaders in business lines of those who wrought with him, he no doubt was first in generous gifts to religious and church work and lines akin to it. Born April 26, 1826, in the town of North Reading, Mass., Mr. Flint was a son of Henry and Mary (Sanborn) Flint, most estimable people but of limited means. The Flints were of good Puritan stock, the North Reading family descending from (I) Thomas Flint, who, with his brother William, was here in New England probably before 1642. William became a large land owner in the vicinity of Flint street, Salem, while Thomas was one of the first settlers in that part of Salem Village which became Danvers, buying land there as early as 1662.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Muster Roll of Captain Nathan Barker’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Nathan Barker’s Company of Light Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the sixth day of March, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta Maine, to the twenty-sixth day of March, 1839, when discharged or mustered. Captain Nathan Barker. Lieutenant Ephriam Harmon. Ensign John S. Willson. Sergeants Simon A. Dyer. Benjamin Boothby. Lothrop Worcester. William Proctor. Corporals James W. Stevens. Stephen Swett. S. V. R. G. Brown. Henry Towle. Musicians Thomas Pennell. William Pike. Privates Babb, Joseph...

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man to witness, except that of Sam Dale, the great scout of General Andrew...

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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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The Cherokee Revolt – Indian Wars

From the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia and Tennessee to Arkansas and their establishment upon the reservation allotted to them by treaty with the Government in Arkansas, they have, until the period of this outbreak to the narrative of which this chapter is devoted, been considered as among the least dangerous and most peaceable of the tribes in that region. But through various causes, chief among which has been notably the introduction among them of a horde of those pests of the West the border ruffians; these half wild, half-breed Nomads were encouraged by these Indians, as it appeared, for the sake of the liquor traffic. According to the official accounts of this attempt to reopen hostilities, it appears that on the 11th of April, 1872, it originated with a man named J. J. Kesterson, living in the Cherokee nation, near the Arkansas line, about fifty miles from Little Rock. On that day he went to Little Rock, and filed information against one Proctor, also a white man, married to a Cherokee woman, for assaulting with intent to kill him while in his saw mill, on the 13th of February. Proctor fired a revolver at Kesterson, the ball striking him just above the left eye, but before he could fire again Kesterson escaped. Proctor, at the time, was under indictment in the Snake District for the murder of his...

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Slave Narrative of Peter Bruner

Interviewer: Evelyn McLemore Person Interviewed: Peter Bruner Date of Interview: 1936 Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co. Date of Birth: 1845 ESTILL CO. (Evelyn McLemore) Story of Peter Bruner, a former slave: Peter Bruner, was born in Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co., in 1845. His master was John Bell Bruner, who at that time treated him fairly well. When Peter was 10 years of age his master brought him and his sister to Irvine. After arriving in Irvine, Peter’s master was very cruel to him. They got only cornbread, fat meat and water to eat. If his master’s hunger was not satisfied, he would even take this little from them. The[TR:?] were tables to eat from. Once Peter, was taken into his master’s house to nurse the children and was made to sleep on the floor with only a ragged quilt to lie on and one thin one over him. Often he was whipped because his mistress said the washing was not clean, when it was. On one occasion when he was beaten his master took a piece of sole leather about 1 foot long and 2 inches wide, cut it full of holes and dipped it in water that was brined. He then took the leather and lashed the poor slave’s back. Joe Bruner, was a better master to his slaves than John. Once when Peter...

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Biographical Sketch of Capt. I. B. Proctor

Captain I. B. Proctor, the present owner of the so-called Felt farm, and proprietor of the Proctor House, situated on the pleasant southern slope of Monadnock mountain, is a native of Lunenburg, Mass., where he was born in 1824, and at which place he lived until 1844, when he was appointed purchasing agent of the Vermont & Massachusetts railroad, with his office in Gardner. In 185r he engaged in the wholesale flour and grain business in Fitchburg. In 1854 was elected captain of the Washington Guards, a fine military company of Fitchburg. In 1858 he was elected superintendent of the Middlesex railroad in Boston. In 1861 he entered the army of the late war, and served two years. In 1873 he was appointed, by Governor Washburn, a justice of the peace for all the counties in the state, and, in 1864 was appointed by the President a commissioner to examine the Union Pacific railroad, which required his making several trips across the plains to California. In 1868 he engaged in the real estate business, as broker and auctioneer, at Fitchburg, and remained in that business until he removed to his present home in Jaffrey, in 1881. In 1875 and ’76 he was elected president of the Worcester North Agricultural Society, of...

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Biographical Sketch of Benjamin Proctor

Benjamin Proctor came to Alstead, from Ipswich, Mass., and settled in the southwestern part of the town, on lands owned by H. G. Barnes, of Walpole. He lived upon this place for many years, and then moved upon the farm now owned by Ezra Webster, where he died, March 23, 1854, aged eighty-six years. He married Susannah Lowe, who died April 5, 1858, aged eight-five years. Only two of his ten children are living, Ebenezer and Louisa. The latter married Philip Wheeler. Ebenezer was born November 17, 1805, and married Anna K., daughter of Daniel Bird. She was born in Watertown, Mass., in 1811. Of their six children, four are living. Of these, Mary F. married Merrill White and lives in Keene. Hattie A. married John Wood and lives in Athol, Mass. John E. lives in Walpole, and Frank H. in Athol, Mass. Ebenezer Proctor represented this town in 1849-50, and was selectman. He moved to Walpole in 1869, where he now...

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Biography of William Proctor, M. D.

WILLIAM PROCTOR, M. D. (deceased), was a physician who always loved knowledge and as a physician was devoted to his profession, careful in his investigations and gave all the time he could find in his busy life to books and periodicals devoted to medicine and surgery. His range of information was broad, and during the many years he pursued the calling of AEsculapius he won a wide reputation and a large practice. He was born in Petersburg, Virginia, in 1826, and died January 10, 1890, when sixty-four years of age. He was a graduate of William and Mary College, of Virginia, and studied law under his father, Thomas Proctor, who subsequently moved to Tennessee, where the Doctor was his stenographer. During the Mexican war the Doctor joined a Tennessee regiment and fought through the war. He was in the battle of Buena Vista and the City of Mexico, and had command of the flags on the rampart. For bravery he was promoted to the rank of captain on the battlefield at Chepultepec, when seventeen years of age. After the war he went to Warren County, Kentucky; where he studied medicine. Later he went to the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, and subsequently began practicing in Warren County. When the Civil War broke out he was Government contractor for the Federal Government and furnished a post at Bowling Green with...

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Biography of Charles Proctor

Charles Proctor. The men who came in the early days to Kansas and stuck to their posts in spite of discouragements and setbacks, have with few exceptions gained all the prosperity that a man of ordinary ambition could erave. Such men possessed character as well as the ability to do hard work, and it is not strange that many of the public honors have been given to such citizens. One of this class in Cloud County is Mr. Charles Prostor of Miltonvale. He had lived a long and useful life and is now past fourscore. His years have ripened his judgment, and through all his experiences and relationships he had maintained unsullied a reputation for integrity of character. He was selected by the citizens of Miltonvale and adjacent territory to various offices of trust and responsibility and gave conscientious exactness to every public performance. From 1888 to 1892 he served Cloud County as county clerk for two terms. He was county commissioner one term and on the school board several terms. He established a postoffice one-half mile west of what is now Miltonvale, where he was postmaster until resigning the office to R. T. Modrell. Mr. Proctor was elected the first president of the Home State and now the Drovers State Bank of Miltonvale, and he was succeeded in that position by his son-in-law, Mr. Culp. Charles Proctor was born in Joe Daviess County,...

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Pearl M. Proctor

Private, F. A., Btry. C, 29th Div., 1st Regt.; of Gates County; son of W. J. and Mrs. Dina P. Proctor. Entered service June 23, 1916, at Salisbury, N.C. Sent to Camp Lee, Va. Transferred to Ft. Sam Houston, Texas. Served on Mexican border nine months. Enlisted in Marine Corps. Served about one month. Mustered out at Portsmouth, Va., June 23,...

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E. L. Proctor

Bugler, 118th Inf., 30th Div., Co. E. Born in Guilford County; Son of Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Proctor; husband of Mrs. Gertrude Proctor. Entered the service June 16, 1917, at High Point, N.C. Was sent to Camp Glenn and from there to El Paso, Texas. Transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C. Sailed for France June 24, 1918. Fought on the Hindenburg Line, Ypres, St. Quentin. Returned to USA March 27, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., March 31,...

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H. G. Proctor

Private 1st Class, Bathing Unit, 89th Div., Med. Enlisted June 21, 1918, at Rome, Ga. Was sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky. Transferred to Camp Crane, Pa. Landed in France Sept. 14, 1918. Fought at Verdun Front. Returned to USA June 4, 1919, and was mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 21,...

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