Surname: Preston

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Leroy Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Albertsen, Albert. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. R. 274.63 ac., sec. 1. (16.) Owner, Edwin F. Johnson. Anderson, A. R. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 360 ac., sec. 25. (33.) Anderson, Chris. Wf. Christina; ch. Christina, Lauritz, Amelia, Iler, Alfred, Samuel and Clarence. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 80 ac., sec. 26. (8.) Anderson, Jens C. Wf. Marie; ch. A. H. C., Carrie, Dagmar, Samuel, Dorcas and Theodora. P. O. Audubon, R. 6. O. 240 ac., sec. 19,...

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Postmasters and Postal Service in Norwich Vermont

It was fifteen years after the admission of Vermont into the Federal Union, and forty years after the settlement of the town, before Norwich had a post office. The first post office was established at Norwich Plain, July 1, 1805, and Jacob Burton was appointed postmaster. Postmaster Burton kept the office in his harness shop on the main street of the village, nearly opposite the present residence of Mrs. William E. Lewis. Probably the duties of the office were not so great as to interfere much with the prosecution of his trade. It is doubtful if Mr. Burton had...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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Slave Narrative of Mrs. Preston

Interviewer: G. Monroe Person Interviewed: Mrs. Preston Location: Madison, Indiana Age: 83 Place of Residence: North Elm Street, Madison, Indiana G. Monroe Dist. 4 Jefferson County SLAVE STORY MRS. PRESTON’S STORY Mrs. Preston is an old lady, 83 years old, very charming and hospitable She lives on North Elm Street, Madison, Indiana. Her first recollections of slavery were of sleeping on the foot of her mistress’ bed, where she could get up during the night to “feed” the fire with chips she had gathered before dark or to get a drink or anything else her mistress might want in the night. Her ‘Marse Brown’, resided in Frankfort having taken his best horses and hogs, and leaving his family in the care of an overseer on a farm. He was afraid the Union soldiers would kill him, but thought his wife would be safe. This opinion proved to be true. The overseer called the slaves to work at four o’clock, and they worked until six in the evening. When Mrs. Preston was a little older part of her work was to drive about a dozen cows to and from the stable. Many a time she warmed her bare feet in the cattle bedding. She said they did not always go barefooted but their shoes were old or their feet wrapped in rags. Her next promotion was to work in the...

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Biographical Sketch of Edwin F. Preston

Preston, Edwin F., New Haven, was born in Burlington, Vt., on March 4, 1857. He is a physician; was reared in Waltham, Vt., and began the study of medicine with Dr. C. W. B. Kidder, of Vergennes, Vt., in 1881; entered the medical department of the Burlington University in the spring of 1882, which he was graduated from in the fall of 1884, and immediately located in New Haven, Vt., where he has since resided. He was married on June 17, 1885, to Cora H. Holley, a daughter of Truman R. and Juliaette (Sanford) Holley, of Cornwall, Vt. He was a son of John and Ann E. (Hall) Preston. His father was a native of Ireland, and his mother of Shelburne, Vt., and were residents of this county for many years; they are now living in Waltham, Vt. They have had a family of twelve children, nine of whom are now living — Samuel J., Edwin F., Sarah (Mrs. A. J. Thompson), John P., Libbie L., Ethel H., Frank B., Wallace, and Nancy...

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Biographical Sketch of John G. Preston

John G. Preston, farmer, Section 19, P. O. Oakland, is a native of England. In 1842, he came to America; in 1852, he engaged in railroading and continued in this business about twenty-eight years. In 1867, he purchased this land, and in the spring of 1880, located here. He owns 800 acres in this county, also 100 acres in Douglas County; is largely engaged in livestock, and now owns 135 head of cattle, and 125 hogs. About five teams are used in working this farm, which is one of the largest in this...

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Biography of Richard O. Preston, M. D.

Richard O. Preston, M. D. Since he completed his medical course Doctor Preston had been in active practice in Meriden in Jefferson County, and his reputation as a capable physician and surgeon is now widely extended. He is the son of a physician, and the name had been identified with medicine and surgery in this part of the state for over forty years. The Prestons are a family originally from England, and they were pioneers in the state of Missouri. Dr. Richard O. Preston was born at Arrington in Atchison County, Kansas, March 12, 1885. His father, Dr. J. F. Preston, who is still in active practice at Effingham, Kansas, was born in Missouri in 1849 and lived there until he was seventeen years of age, when he came to Kansas in 1866, locating in Leavenworth County, where he came to manhood and married, He gradnated from the University of Louisville, Kentucky, with the degree M. D., and had been in practice over forty years. He was located at Arrington twenty years, and for the past twenty-three years his home and center of professional labors had been at Effingham. The senior Doctor Preston is a republican of the old school, is an active member of the Christian Church, and belongs to the Masonic fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He married Elizabeth Sutton, who was born in...

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Biographical Sketch of Rev. J. L. Preston

Rev. Mr. Preston was born in the state of Tennessee in the year 1839. When he arrived at his majority he migrated to Tutis County, Texas, where he met Miss Mahala J. Caudle and they were united in marriage. He then moved to Hopkins County. Eleven children were born to this union, eight of whom are living. They are all married, have homes and are doing well ; being good, substantial citizens of the county. Their mother is a hale hearty woman, possessed of great energy and an amiable disposition. Dr. B. J. Preston, a young physician of prominence, and who passed away at Emblem in this county, was their son. Rev. Mr. Preston served as a soldier, acting as a non-commissioned officer in the war. He was a brave and courageous officer. He is a Baptist preacher, walking upright before God and man, has great force of character, his religion being of that practical kind which by act more than by word demonstrates the reality of his profession and the sincerity of his convictions. He is well and widely known in the county, and stands ¢high in the estimation of the...

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Biography of James Cyrus Preston, M. D.

James Cyrus Preston, M. D. One of the foremost men of Buffalo, Kansas, is Dr. James Cyrus Preston, the pioneer physician, and for many years the leader in medical thought in Wilson County, and the wise adviser and stable supporter of public enterprises which have assisted greatly in the town’s development. Doctor Preston came first to Buffalo after some years of medical experience in Arizona, and thus was well prepared for the hardships and handicaps that attended his early days here, in 1889, and with the exception of an interim of five years, had been a continuous resident and a busy physician and surgeon. He was born in Fulton County, Illinois, March 13, 1863. His parents were William H. and Adaline (Thomas) Preston. The early Prestons were of English birth and descent and were Colonial settlers in New England. The grandfather of Doctor Preston was Richard Preston, who was born in Vermont, in 1805, and died in Howard County, Iowa, in 1882. In 1845 he removed with his family to Winnebago County, Illinois, seeking work as a carpenter and cabinetmaker, in which he was skilled. It is said of him that he had great facility with the drum and his services were often in demand when militia was under training. His wife, Hannah Gilmore, was born in New England in 1807, and died in Iowa in 1867. William H....

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Biography of Zachariah Taylor Preston

Zachariah Taylor Preston, who is successfully engaged in farming a mile north of Ramona in Washington County, was born on Grand River, twenty-five miles east of Vinita, Craig County, Oklahoma, on the 23d of January, 1883. His father, Charles Henry Preston, was a native of Virginia and on coming to the Indian Territory settled near Grove. He was a surgeon and served in the Confederate army during the Civil war. He practiced medicine and surgery in the Indian Territory and in the state of Oklahoma until fifteen years prior to his death, passing away at the home of his son, Z. T. Preston, in 1917, at the notable old age of one hundred and three years. He never used a cane and could read ordinary print without the aid of glasses to the end of his life. He possessed notable physical endurance, was never ill and, in fact, was around the house until within fifteen minutes of his demise when he laid down upon his bed and passed away without the least suffering. “The weary wheels of life at length stood still” and as one falling into a peaceful sleep death came to him. His wife, who in her maidenhood was Martha Elizabeth LaMar, was a native of Illinois and was brought to the Indian Territory by her parents during her childhood days. She was of Cherokee extraction and...

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Biographical Sketch of John Preston

John Preston was left an orphan when very young, but at eight years of age he was adopted by an old gentleman and his wife, who were very kind to him. They took him to Rock Castle Co., Kentucky, and educated him, as though he had been their own son. When he was of age he married Jane Day, and came to St. Charles County, Missouri, in 1820. They had eleven children, only five of whom lived to be grown. Their names were Frank L., Mary W., Caroline V., Liberty M., and Fanny H. Mr. Preston and his wife were the first members of the Old Baptist Church at...

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