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Surname: Piper

Bolton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Bolton Massachusetts.

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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Kephart – Walker Family Bible

This is a family Bible owned by H. H. and Mary Kephart of Osceola, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. At some point in it’s providence passed into Annie R. Kephart’s hand and her marriage to Abram L. Walker. At some point it appears the Bible then passed into the hands of Nancy Alda Walker where children from her two marriages appear. The Shultzaberger line comes from the marriage of Nancy Alda Walker to George Levi Shultzaberger. The Wiedman line below comes from the marriage of Nancy Alda Walker to John Lee Wiedman. In this Bible also is the baptismal certificate of...

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Business Men of Northern Maine

The Northern Maine, its Points of Interest and its Representative Business Men manuscript provides historical sketches of the nine towns featured within it’s embrace, as well as biographical sketches of the businesses and the men and women who owned and ran those businesses found within the towns of Houlton, Presque Isle, Caribou, Ft. Fairfield, Danforth, Lincoln, Mattawamkeag, Winn, and Kingman.

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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that...

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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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Biographical Sketch of Aaron J. Piper

Piper, Aaron J., Middlebury, was born in Salisbury, Addison county, Vt., on March 24, 1839. His parents were John and Philena (Hire) Piper. He was educated in the common schools, and brought up to farming. He was thrown upon his own resources at an early age, and enlisted under the first call for 75,000 men, in the spring of 1861, in Captain Hayward’s company, First Vermont, for three months, served his term, and again enlisted December 19, 1861, in Company C, Seventh Vermont Infantry, under General Butler, at Baton Rogue, and at the beginning of the battle in the morning was struck in the shoulder with a ball, which necessitated amputation at the shoulder. He was an inmate of St. James Hospital, New Orleans, until October 7, 1862. He received his discharge and returned to civil life on September 19, 1863. He returned to Salisbury, Vt., and went on the road selling goods, which he followed for thirteen years. He was lister of the town of Salisbury, Addison county, Vt., for one year; was married on April 5, 1864, to Adelphia H. Brown, a daughter of Elijah and Myra Brown, who were well-known residents of Ripton, Vt. They have had two sons born to them — Erwin G. and J. Kirk. Mr. Piper, in the spring of 1876, engaged in the purchase and selling of live stock, a business...

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Biography of Augustus Piper

A large proportion of Racine County’s substantial citizens have been of German birth or of German descent, and the enterprise and efficiency which have characterized that country have been manifest in these sons of the fatherland who have sought to enjoy the opportunities of the new world. Such was the record of Augustus Piper, a native of Prussia, Germany, who was born on the 19th of August. 1825, and lost his father when but six months old. In 1840 his mother, with her children, took ship for the United States, but the vessel was wrecked at the island of Haiti and the family remained in San Domingo for several months. The mother died there of yellow fever. Augustus Piper at length came to the United States and settled at Cleveland, Ohio, where he made his home with an old friend, Mr. Hansche. After remaining in the Buckeye state for three years he went to New Orleans, where he spent six months, at the end of which time he returned to Ohio. In 1849 he drove from that state to Wisconsin and for two years thereafter worked in this state as a farm hand. He carefully saved his earnings and as soon as possible bought a tract of land on time, making a payment with the capital which he had saved. Gradually, as his resources increased, he added to his...

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Biographical Sketch of J. F. Piper

J. F. Piper, firm of Blanchard & Piper, general merchandise, is a native of Franklin County, Penn. In 1865, he came to Wayne County, Ohio; in 1877, came to Tekamah, clerked for John F. Kessler about four years in Tekamah and Lyons. In August, 1881, he, with Mr. Blanchard, bought out Mr. Kessler, and have since been carrying on this...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry H. Piper

Henry H. Piper, son of Henry C., married Laura W., daughter of Rec George M. and Persis F. (Weeks) Rice, has one child and resides on road 12. He was appointed delegate to the Exposition of New Orleans for 1884, by the Bureau of Education at...

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Biographical Sketch of Solomon Piper

Solomon Piper, great-grandson of Nathaniel, who came from England, and settled in Ipswich, Mass., was a soldier in the Revolution, and a native of Concord, Mass. He married Susannah Pratt, of Greenwich, Mass., and reared a family of twelve children, only one of whom is now living His son, Rufus, married Anna Gowing, of Dublin, and had three children, all now living. His youngest son, Henry C., was twice married, first to Maria e. Perry, and second to Harriet e., daughter of Calvin and Elvira W. Stone. of Marlboro, and has two children now living. He resides upon a farm on road 12 in this town- His brother, James g., was also twice married, first to Abigail Clifford, of Edgecomb, Me., second to Eliza, daughter of John and Charlotte Batchelder, of Boston, Mass., and has three children. He occupies a farm on road 12, the first settler of which was William Greenwood, who located there in...

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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Biography of John Piper

John Piper, now living a retired life in Freeport, was born Feb. 7, 1832, in Washington county, Maryland, at the place where, thirty years later, the great battle of Antietam was fought. His parents were Jacob and Anna (Kitzmiller) Piper, both of Washington county, and his grandfather, Daniel Piper, was born February 4, 1780, and died March 3, 1857. He was a farmer and spent all of his life in the above county. His wife, whose maiden name was Brown, was born September 2, 1774, and died July 8, 1851. Grandmother Kitzmiller was born January 23, 1777, and died July 30, 1860. May 15, 1845, Jacob Piper started for the west by wagon train, in a pasty composed of twenty-one persons, eleven of whom are now living, as follows : Mrs. Henry Dovenberger, Forreston, Illinois; John Dovenberger, Forreston; D. J. Piper, Brookville township, Ogle county, Illinois; Elizabeth Shearer (now married), Maryland township, Ogle county; Mrs. August Bergman, Freeport; Mrs. D. D. Iler, Ridott Village; Sarah Kitzmiller, Ridott; John Piper, subject of sketch; Elizabeth A. Trime, Le Grande, Iowa; Jacob W. Piper, Le Grande, Iowa; J. M. Piper, county superintendent of schools of Ogle county, Illinois. Those deceased are: Jacob Piper and wife; Anna Piper; Henry Shearer and wife; Mrs. Shearer; Jacob Dovenber and wife ; Henry Dovenberger; Mrs. Geo. Dowel; Samuel Fiper (soldier in Union Army); John Kitzmiller (drafted...

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