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Surname: Pearson

Jackson Family of Fall River, MA

Here in this article it is the purpose to treat of but one branch or family of the Massachusetts Jacksons – the family of John Jackson, who was a descendant of the Middleboro settler of the name, one John Jackson, and who in time removed to the State of Maine, the home State for several generations of the Fall River Jacksons in question. The first John Jackson came from England to New England and settled in Middleboro, where in May, 1714, he was married to Mary Smith. They had two children (if not more), John and Cornelius, the latter of whom was born in Middleboro Sept. 11, 1716. The father died in 1731.

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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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Washington County, Idaho Pioneer Honor Roll

In 1940 and 1943, a survey of everyone who had lived in Washington County continuously for 50 years or more, was made by the Weiser American. These pioneer residents were especially honored at the Fall Festival held in the fall of both years. So far as is known, the list compiled by the survey is complete and perhaps the only record of its kind in existence. The community loyalty and neighborly spirit that typifies this locality is our legacy from these early pioneers. Their sweat and toil made possible many luxuries that we of Washington County now enjoy. Their...

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Slave Narrative of Rosa Starke

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Rosa Starke Location: Winnsboro, South Carolina Date of Birth: 1854 Age: 83 Occupation: Farm work, hoeing and picking cotton. Rosa’s grandfather was a slave of Solicitor Starke. Although she has had two husbands since slavery, she has thrown their names into the discard and goes by the name of Rosa Starke. She lives in a three-room frame house with her son, John Harrison, two miles south of Winnsboro, S.C., on the plantation of Mrs. Rebecca V. Woodward. She still does farm work, hoeing and picking cotton. “They say I was six years old when de war commence poppin’ in Charleston. Mammy and pappy say dat I was born on de Graham place, one of de nineteen plantations of my old marster, Nick Peay, in 1854. My pappy was name Bob and my mammy name Salina. They had b’longed to old Marse Tom Starke befo’ old Marse Nick bought them. My brudders was name Bob and John. I had a sister name Carrie. They was all older than me. “My marster, Nick Peay, had nineteen places, wid a overseer and slave quarters on every place. Folks dat knows will tell you, dis day, dat them nineteen plantations, in all, was twenty-seven thousand acres. He had a thousand slaves, more or less, too many to take a census of. Befo’ de numerator git ’round, some...

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Slave Narrative of Reverend Squire Dowd

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Rev. Squire Dowd Location: 202 Battle Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: April 3, 1855 [HW: language not negro, very senternous & interesting.] [TR: The above comment is crossed out.] Reverend Squire Dowd 202 Battle Street Raleigh, N. C. My name is Squire Dowd, and I was born April 3, 1855. My mother’s name was Jennie Dowd. My father’s name was Elias Kennedy. My mother died in Georgia at the age of 70, and my father died in Moore County at the age of 82. I attended his funeral. My sister and her husband had carried my mother to Georgia, when my sister’s husband went there to work in turpentine. My mother’s husband was dead. She had married a man named Stewart. You could hardly keep up with your father during slavery time. It was a hard thing to do. There were few legal marriages. When a young man from one plantation courted a young girl on the plantation, the master married them, sometimes hardly knowing what he was saying. My master was General W. D. Dowd. He lived three miles from Carthage, in Moore County, North Carolina. He owned fifty slaves. The conditions were good. I had only ten years’ experience, but it was a good experience. No man is fool enough to buy slaves to kill. I have never known...

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Biography of Richmond Pearson

Richmond Pearson, late of Davie county when a part of Rowan, was born in Dinwiddie county, Va., in 1770, and at the age of nineteen years came to North Carolina and settled in the forks of the Yadkin river. When the war of the Revolution broke out he was a Lieutenant in Captain Bryan’s company (afterward the celebrated Colonel Bryan, of Tory memory). After the Declaration of Independence, at the first muster which occurred, he requested some on whom he could rely to load their guns. When Captain Bryan came on the ground he ordered all the men into ranks. Pearson refused, and tendered his commission to Bryan, whereupon he ordered him under arrest. This was resisted, and he was told that the men had their guns loaded. They then came to a parley, and it was agreed by the crowd, as matters stood, that Bryan and Pearson, on a fixed day, should settle this national affair by a fair “fist fight”, and whichever whipped, the company should belong to the side of the conqueror, whether Whig or Tory. At the appointed time and place the parties met, and the Lieutenant proved to be the victor. From this time the Fork company was for liberty, and Bryan’s crowd, on Dutchman’s creek, were Loyalists. The anecdote illustrates by what slight circumstances events of this period were affected. When Cornwallis came...

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Biography of Daniel O. Pearson

DANIEL O. PEARSON. – One of the most respected and honored of all of Washington’s citizens is the pioneer of Stanwood whose face looks at us from the opposite page. He is one of those whose integrity and universal kindness, as well as public spirit and business enterprise, are of the truest need in laying the foundations of a community. Mr. Pearson was born at Lowell, Massachusetts, April 11, 1846. His parents were Daniel and Susan (Brown) Pearson, who now reside near Coupville, Washington. The first removal of the family was to Salmon Falls, while Daniel was yet an infant. There they remained till he was twelve years old. Returning to Lowell, they gave the son the best of educational advantages at the High School of that city. Having a collegiate education in hope, he was already well on in the preparatory course, when the tempest of the Civil war in 1861 called him, with so many of the other boys of the nation, to her defense. Mr. Pearson was one of the one-hundred day men, enlisting as a volunteer in Company G, Sixth Massachusetts Infantry. At the expiration of his term of service, he returned home and spent his time at the painter’s trade, which he had previously learned. Soon after the close of the war, Mercer’s Colony scheme, which created so much interest on this coast, and...

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Biography of Joseph E. Pearson

Joseph E. Pearson. Among the families that have helped forward the remarkable economic transformation by which the waste lands of Champaign County were reclaimed and converted into productive fields and a smiling landscape of happy homes, a place of prosperous usefulness belongs to those of the Pearson name represented by Mr. Joseph E. Pearson, whose home is in section 11 of Harwood Township. His post office is Ludlow. Mr. Pearson was born in Mason County, Illinois, a son of Robert and Mary (Fletcher) Pearson. His father was a native of England but married in America, and from Mason County moved to Champaign County. When the Pearsons first settled here they had many unpleasant things to contend with. Much of the land was wet, covered with sloughs, and acre after acre had to be redeemed to cultivation at the expense of much labor and money. But Robert Pearson had the energy requisite for such an undertaking, and in course of time he not only had a fine farm, but became one of the extensive land owners in Champaign County, having an estate of 560 acres. He and his wife finally retired to a comfortable home in Rantoul, where this good old timer entered into rest in 1913. Joseph R. Pearson was educated in the public schools, and, was also a student in the State Normal University at Normal and in...

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Biography of Matthew Edgar Pearson

Matthew Edgar Pearson is serving his fifteenth consecutive year as superintendent of the public schools of Kansas City, Kansas. He began his work in the schools of this city thirty years ago, and no one individual had so intimate a knowledge of the actual growth and development of the local school system and had done more to improve its efficiency than the Pearsons. He is one of the best known and oldest educators in the State of Kansas. Mr. Pearson was born at Plainsfield in Hendricks County, Indiana, March 8, 1862, but had lived in Kansas since he was ten years of age. He was the second in a family of six children. His parents were Enoch S. and Edith (Stanley) Pearson, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Indiana. Enoch Pearson spent his life as a farmer. He was a Quaker and his family were of the strictest of that sect, having come to America with the William Penn Colony and they practiced the Quaker principles so faithfully that few if any of the name ever served in any of the wars of the nation. Enoch Pearson attended that fine old Quaker school of the Middle West, Earlham College, at Richmond, Indiana. In 1872 he brought his family to Kansas. He came to this state largely to give his sons better and broader opportunities. The...

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Biographical Sketch of E. W. Pearson

E. W. Pearson, an enterprising farmer of Coffee County, was born in Bedford County, November 23, 1856. He is the son of Charles and Mary J. (Wells) Pearson, natives of Tennessee. The elder Pearson was a manufacturer in Bedford County until 1871, when he was a farmer and millwright in Coffee County, and finally at Sparta, Tennessee, where he is still milling. Our subject, the oldest of seven children, after an academic training attended Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York. Returning home he began the lumber business for I. W. Whitman, of Boston, and in August 1878, was employed by the Stone Fort Paper Company. In 1879 he became contractor for Hicks & Pearson, Flat Creek, and then began mercantile business at Gallatin. Returning to Coffee County he erected a lumber dressing and bending factory near Manchester soon moved it to Tullahoma. After a year in saw milling he built at Normandy a spoke and handle factory. After a time as drummer for Smith, Gifford & Co., of Nashville, he settled on his present farm. He married Fanny Price, of Manchester, October 28, 1880. Born to them were Charles L., December 29, 1882, and James P., February 20, 1885. Mr. Pearson is a decided democrat, and is school director and road commissioner. He and his wife are members of the Christian...

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Pearson, William Mrs. – Obituary

Pioneer Of Grande Ronde Valley Died In Island City Mrs. William Pearson who resides on the Vandecar farm, received word last Wednesday from Island City that her mother, Mrs. Emma Jane Shafer, had passed away. Mrs. Pearson left at once for Island City. Funeral services for Mrs. Shafer were held Sunday afternoon from the Snodgrass & Zimmerman chapel in La Grande, Rev. W.C. Ross of the Presbyterian church officiating. Mrs. Shafer came to the Grande Ronde Valley 54 years ago. Her husband died nine years ago. Surviving her are two sons, Fred of Troy, Oregon, and Isaac of Island City; four daughters, Mrs. Allie Pearson of North Powder, Mrs. Minnie A. Oldenberg of Santa Rosa, Calif., Mrs. Marguerite Chandler and Mrs. Clara Sixbey of La Grande. North Powder News Saturday, March 27,...

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Pearson, Leona – Obituary

North Powder, Oregon Oct.. 13 – Leona Pearson, graveside service, 2 p.m., North Powder Cemetery La Grande Observer – October 12, 2009 ___________________________________ Leona June Pearson, 75, of La Grande, died Oct. 8 at her home. A graveside service will begin at 2 p.m. Tuesday at the North Powder Cemetery. Loveland Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements. La Grande Observer – October 12, 2009 ______________________________ Leona J. Pearson La Grande 1934-2009 Leona June Pearson, 75 of La Grande, died Oct. 8 in the family home surrounded by her children and other loved ones. Leona was born July 28, 1934, to Harry and Rose Breeden in Worley, Idaho. She was married to Garnet Black May 1950 through 1970. She married Benjamin F. Pearson July of 1979. Leona was a rollerskate car hop at the boat drive-in in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, and was voted queen of her rollerskate club, the Lake City Rollers, in 1946. She worked in many restaurants including the Royal Cafe, Corner Cafe and Truck Stop, Sunshine Inn, Broken Wheel, B&M and Ann’s Cafe, all in Kellogg, and Fancy Dan’s. She owned the Bazaar Boutique on Adams Avenue for seven years. Leona retired as cook at the Union County Jail in 1999. Leona loved to bowl and was a member of many bowling leagues. She loved her trips to the nationals, which were like mini vacations for...

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