Surname: Patterson

Seneca County New York Biographies

In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and linked each edition to the PDF file. Once you’ve found the biography you...

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Geographical Names of the Norwich VT Locality

Of the little settlements in the township of Norwich which seem to be existing in the sunset of their former glory, may be mentioned Beaver Meadow, or West Norwich. This place presents a notable instance of that decline in population and decay of business interests in a rural community, of which Vermont affords many examples since the advent of railroads and the fever of western emigration set in. For more than thirty years population, wealth, and enterprise have been drifting away from that section of the town. Probably the settlement reached the height of its prosperity previous to 1840. During the decade that preceded this date two churches were built here, a Baptist church in 1835, and Methodist church about two years later. Regular meetings were held, and full congregations gathered from the immediate neighborhood. Large families of children filled the schools, to the number of sixty pupils of a winter, sometimes. The village had for many years its well-stocked country store, and a variety of mechanics’ shops. Intelligent and thrifty farmers cultivated the productive farms. Before 1850 the exodus commenced. The Baptist society had its last settled minister in 1869, and a few years later, the church having become nearly extinct, the meeting house was taken down, and the lumber used to build a parsonage for the Baptist church in Sharon village. Four years earlier the Methodists had...

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History of the Bridges Between Hanover NH and Norwich VT

The earliest form of transportation across the Connecticut River between Norwich and Hanover of which we have any information was the canoe of Nathan Messenger, who sometime in the summer of the year 1765 established a hunting camp near the bank of the river, a few rods south of where the west end of Hanover bridge now is. In this canoe the family and household goods of John Hutchinson were brought over from the Hanover side in the late fall of the same year, at the completion of their long journey from Ashford, Conn., to their new home. This...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc, an Indian name signifying ‘the place of very white stones’ whose waters emptied...

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Elizabeth Patterson, Madame Jerome Bonaparte

The city into which Baltimore Town was legislated on the last day of the year 1796 already fostered within its limits the germ of the dual life, social and commercial, to which it has owed its subsequent eminence. Not infrequently, in the days of its inception, the same roof sheltered drawing-room and warehouse, the earlier merchants deeming it necessary to keep their growing interests constantly beneath their personal vigilance. Later, the commercial life crowded out the domestic life, and merchants built their dwellings stately bricks or frames, painted blue, yellow, or white, facing on avenues of locust-trees in another...

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Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Cattaraugus Reservation, in Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Erie Counties, New York, as delineated on the map, occupies both sides of Cattaraugus creek. It is 9.5 miles long on a direct east and west line, averages 3 miles in width at the center, dropping at is eastern line an additional rectangle of 2 by 3 miles. A 6-mile strip on the north and 2 “mile blocks” at diagonal corners are occupied by white people, and litigation is pending as to their rights and responsibilities. The Seneca Nation claims that the permit or grant under which said lands were occupied and...

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Biographical Sketch of Otis Patterson

OTIS PATTERSON. – Mr. Patterson, editor of the Heppner Gazette, at Heppner, Oregon, and one of the representative men of common sense and energy in the Inland Empire, was born at Danville, Indiana, September 4, 1858. He remained in that city until the age of eighteen, receiving a good common-school education. He also improved himself by a scientific course, graduating as B.S. from the Centeral Normal College of Danville. In 1876 he acted upon the advice of a celebrated father of his profession, and came to Emporia, Kansas, where he engaged in educational work. In 1882 he performed the rest of the journey across the continent, stopping in California. Remaining there only a short time, however, he came by way of Portland, Oregon to Walla Walla, where he once more became a teacher of schools, following that occupation in various schools in Walla Walla county until 1885. In that year he became principal of the Heppner Public School, and conducted that institution with great success. The following spring he entered into business, successfully establishing a store in the hardware line. Seeing the opportunity and feeling the desire to occupy a somewhat more advanced position as educator, not simply of children but of men and of the people at large, he purchased in 1888 the Heppner Gazette and has conducted that periodical to the present time with very marked success,...

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Biography of A. W. Patterson, M.D.

A.W. PATTERSON, M.D. – Doctor Patterson was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, October 14, 1814. He received his scholastic education in the village of Freeport, of his native state, and afterwards entered the Western University, at Pittsburgh. He subsequently studied medicine in the office of Doctor J.P. Gazzam, an old and prominent physician of that city, and in 1841 graduated with high honors from the Pennsylvania College of Medicine, of Philadelphia. Coming westward, he located at Greenfield, Indiana, and there practiced his profession until 1852, when he concluded to come to Oregon, and began the long and tedious journey known only to the pioneer. After his arrival he went to Lane county and there settled upon a Donation claim near the present site of the flourishing town of Eugene. The settlers in those days being few and far between, there was but little call for those skilled in his profession; and, being conversant with civil engineering, he engaged in the surveying business for a time. Among the contracts taken were several for the government, they being both in Oregon and Washington. The reports of surveys to be found in the surveyor-general’s office, submitted by him, will attest the guidance of a master hand. He also laid off the townsite of Eugene City. On the outbreak of the Indian war of 1855-56 in Southern Oregon, he at once offered his...

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Biographical Sketch of M. L. Patterson

(See Berry and Ghigau) —M. L., son of Thomas and Adeline (Berry) Patterson, was born December 21,1856, in South Carolina. Married July 14, 1890 Zonia, daughter of Albert and Sarah Dawson, born February 5, 1870 in Tarrant County, Texas. They are the parents of Sarah, born April 21, 1891; Martha, born January 1, 1893; Claude A., born March 6, 1895, served in the A. E. F. for two years in France as sniper; Edgar Dawson, born July 3, 1897, served for two years and six months on the battleship South Carolina in the navy; Thomas, born June 9, 1899; Roscoe, born December 24, 1893; Ola born July 17, 1907 Fredrick, born October 12, 1909, and Virgil V. born August 29, 1901. Mr. Patterson is a farmer near...

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Daubenspeck Cemetery, Hamilton County, Indiana

This cemetery is located on land once owned by J. Daubenspeck, and thus its name. At one time a Methodist Church stood here, and presumably this cemetery is associated with that church. It is located on 96th Street, near State Road 421. There were many broken or buried stones not transcribed below. This cemetery is also known as Calvary Cemetery.

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Slave Narrative of Amy E. Patterson

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: Amy Elizabeth Patterson Location: Evansville, Indiana Place of Birth: Cardiz, Trigg County, Kentucky Date of Birth: July 12, 1850 Place of Residence: 512 Linwood Avenue, Evansville, Indiana Age: 87 Ex-Slave Stories District #5 Vanderburgh County Lauana Creel MEMORIES OF SLAVERY AND THE LIFE STORY OF AMY ELIZABETH PATTERSON The slave mart, separation from a dearly beloved mother and little sisters are among the earliest memories recalled by Amy Elizabeth Patterson, a resident of Evansville, Indiana. Amy Elizabeth, now known as “Grandmother Patterson” resides with her daughter Lula B. Morton at 512 Linwood Avenue near Cherry Street. Her birth occurred July 12, 1850 at Cadiz, Trigg County, Kentucky. Her mother was Louisa Street, slave of John Street, a merchant of Cadez. [TR: likely Cadiz] “John Street was never unkind to his slaves” is the testimony of Grandmother Patterson, as she recalls and relates stories of the long ago. “Our sorrow began when slave traders, came to Cadiz and bought such slaves as he took a fancy to and separated us from our families!” John Street ran a sort of agency where he collected slaves and yearly sold them to dealers in human flesh. Those he did not sell he hired out to other families. Some were hired or indentured to farmers, some to stock raisers, some to merchants and some to captains of boats and...

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Biography of Rueben S. Patterson

Reuben Spaulding Patterson, mayor of the city of Belleville, is descended from a family which was among the original settlers in Londonderry, N. H., emigrating from the north of Ireland in 1736. Peter Patterson, the progenitor of the Pattersons in New Hampshire, was from the county of Antrim, born in 1716, and dying in 1800. The colonists who came with him brought their minister and doctor, and everything which they thought would be necessary in starting a colony. The grandfather of Reuben was Thomas Patterson, who fought for the independence of the American colonies, and who was in the third generation from the pioneer in Southern New Hampshire. The parents of our subject were Robert and Esther (Spaulding) Patterson, his father being at one time a member of the New Hampshire Legislature and a merchant in Londonderry, where he was born; and his mother was a second cousin to Franklin Pierce, President of the United States in 1853-1857, and was born from English parentage. Reuben was born in Londonderry, March 26, 1820, and was the sixth child in a family o f ten children, eight sons and two daughters. In 1829 the family emigrated to western New York, settling in Perry, then in Genesee, now in Wyoming county, where Reuben was educated in the district school and the Perry Centre academy, his father there settling on a farm. Both...

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Biography of J. A. Patterson

This prominent and wealthy citizen of Muskogee, was born in September, 1819, at Lincoln County, Tennessee, the second son of William Patterson and Annie Newberry, of the same place. He attended neighborhood school until thirteen years of age, when his father moved to Cherokee County, Alabama. Here the young man assisted his parents until his father’s death in 1848, when he assumed the responsibility of taking charge of his mother, sisters and brothers. In 1854 he came to the Creek Agency in the employment of Colonel Garrett, the agent, and afterwards became teacher of a Creek school for two years. In 1856 he entered the general mercantile store of Stidham & Bright, at the agency; with these gentlemen he remained until 1860, when he opened business with D. W. Stidham, at Shieldsville, and here continued until November, 1861, when the war broke out, and they removed their stock of goods back to the agency. Soon afterwards he became sutler for the refugee Creeks, at Fort Washita, which position he retained until the close of the war, after which he went into business with Major J. Harlin, in cattle trading and merchandise, at Tishomingo, Chickasaw Nation. Closing out in twelve months, Mr. Patterson returned to the agency, and in 1867 again connected himself with Judge Stidham in the mercantile trade, doing an immense business all over the nation, and continuing...

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Biography of W.W. Patterson

W. W. Patterson, one of the leading business men of Alexandria, was born in Smith County in 1843, the second of eight children of Samuel F. and Catherine (Smith) Patterson. The father was of Scotch-Irish descent, born in Wilson County in 1801, and the son of Samuel Patterson, a native of Ireland who immigrated to America at about the age of sixteen. He settled in Wilson County, where he married and spent the remainder of his life as a tiller of the soil. Samuel F. was first married to Miss Lucy Waters, by whom he had two children, one living. His second union was with Mrs. Compton, nee Coe; to them one child was born. About 1835 he wedded the mother of our subject, who was born in Wilson County about 1812, and died in 1876. In 1832 Mr. Patterson moved to Smith County, where he was a prosperous farmer. He served several years as constable and magistrate. He died in 1884. Both were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Six of their children are living. Our subject was educated in the country schools. In 1861 at the age of seventeen he entered the Confederate Army, Company F, Twenty-fourth Tennessee Infantry. He took part in the battle of Shiloh, and was the only one of nine guards who escaped uninjured. After twelve months’ faithful service he was discharged on...

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