Surname: Parrish

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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Biography of Rev. Josiah Lamberson Parrish

REV. JOSIAH LAMBERSON PARRISH. – This well-known pioneer, one of the few survivors of the early missionary force of Oregon, was born in Onondaga county, New York, on the 14th of October, 1806. From his father he learned the trades of blacksmithing and farming; and to them he devoted most of his time till he reached the age of twenty-four. At that time failure of his health from overwork caused him to turn his attention to the harness and saddlery trade. At about the same time he began preaching as a local preacher in the Methodist church. His field of labor was at Pike, Alleghany county, New York. In 1833 he was married to Elizabeth Winn. Two years later he closed out his business as a saddle and harness dealer, and devoted his time mainly to preaching until 1839. He was then appointed blacksmith to the Methodist Mission of Oregon by the New York board. In company with Jason Lee he came to Oregon in the ship Lausanne. The course was via Cape Horn. After reaching Oregon, MR. Parrish spent two years in blacksmithing for various missionary stations and settlers in the Willamette valley. In 1843 he was appointed missionary to the Indians at the mouth of the Columbia river. He remained there until the Mission was closed in 1846. After a short stay at Oregon City, he was...

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Biographical Sketch of Watson Parrish

Watson Parrish, attorney at law and banker, is a native of Tennessee. At about the age of two years he came with his parents to Whiteside County, Ill. After receiving a preparatory course of studies, he attended the Knox College at Galesburg. At the breaking-out of the war, he enlisted in Company G, Thirty-ninth Illinois Infantry, and served three years and four months. He then went to Ann Arbor and entered the Law Department of the University of Michigan; graduated in the class of 1866. In September 1866, he came to Decatur, Neb.; opened a law office, and has since followed his profession. He was elected to the Legislature in 1869; served during the extra session till 1871. He, with Mr. Griffin, established this bank October 4, 1879. Mr. Parrish has always taken an active part in the Republican State...

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Biography of Barnett P. Parrish

BARNETT P. PARRISH. Although almost eighty years have passed over the head of the gentleman who is the subject of this sketch, he is well preserved, physically and mentally, and is a typical representative of the native Ohioan, honest and upright in word and deed, energetic and pushing, and of a decidedly practical turn of mind. He was born in the Buckeye State September 13, 1818, and is a son of Ira O. W. W. and Ruth (Cheneworth) Parrish. It is thought that the father was a Virginian by birth, but at an early date he was married in Ohio and, when our subject was but seven or eight years of age, he and family removed to Vermillion County, Indiana, and in 1835 to Illinois. Later they left that State and settled in the woods of Polk County, Missouri, improved a farm, and there passed the remainder of their lives, Mr. Parrish dying a number of years after the war, when eighty-three years of age. He was a well-to-do farmer and hotel man, and was a soldier in the War of 1812. He was of Irish descent. His wife died before the war. They were the parents of nine children: William Thomas, who died when a boy; Barnett P., the subject of this sketch; Casandria, deceased, who was the wife of Calvin Gaylor; Joseph, a soldier of the Mexican...

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Biographical Sketch of Ellison J. Parrish

Parrish, Ellison J.; supt. Telegraph Dept., Nickel Plate R. R.; born, Terre Haute, Ind., Oct. 9, 1865; son of D. P. and Ellenora Spain Parrish, educated, common schools, Terre Haute, Ind.; married, Conneaut, O., May 24, 1887, Pearl J. Griffey; elected Mayor of Conneaut, O., 1902-1907-1909; only Democrat ever elected in the city for this honor; was first Mayor of the city when it changed from a village; 1908 and 1912, delegate National Democratic Convention; appointed by Gov. Harmon three times as delegate to National Convention of Water Ways at Washington, D. C.; train dispatcher for Nickel Plate R. R. Co., 1886-1912; then promoted to supt. telegraph; director Journal of Progress; member Civil Service Commission, Conneaut, 0.; member Elks. Recreations: Baseball and Outdoor...

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Biography of A. H. Parrish

One of the representative agriculturists of Nowata county is A. H. Parrish, who is engaged in farming four and one-quarter miles northeast of Alluwe. He was born in Coowescoowee district on the 2d of November, 1870, a son of Holland L. and Cynthia J. (Daniel) Parrish, the latter being of Cherokee extraction. The father located in Indian Territory on the 2d of February, 1869, acquiring land one mile south of Coodys Bluff, where he is still residing. He is now seventy-three years of age and enjoying the best of health. Mrs. Parrish was born in Boone county, Arkansas, and died on the 20th of March, 1893, in her forty-third year. Her father, William C. Daniel, was born near Memphis, Tennessee, on November 4, 1822. A. H. Parrish received his education in the common schools of Coodys Bluff, but he was unable to attend regularly as it was necessary for him to work in order to contribute to the support of the family. At the age of twenty-two years he left the home farm and moved to his present place of one hundred and seventy acres, four and a quarter miles northeast of Alluwe and four miles southeast of his old home. His home and outbuildings are modern and kept in a good state of repair and besides having eighty acres under cultivation he has fine timber and pasture land....

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Biography of W. T. Parrish

One of the well known farmers of Nowata County is W. T. Parrish, who is residing five miles southeast of Nowata. He is a native of this County, his birth having occurred in Alluwe township on the 18th of February, 1881, a son of Holland L. and Cynthia J. (Daniel) Parrish, the latter being of Cherokee extraction. Extended mention of Mr. and Mrs. Parrish is made in the sketch of A. H. Parrish, on another page of this work. In the acquirement of an education W. T. Parrish attended the common schools of Nowata County. Putting his textbooks aside at an early age, he engaged in farming. His present farm, five miles southeast of Nowata, consists of one hundred and thirty acres and he likewise owns a homestead of fifty acres on the Verdigris River, three miles northeast of the home place. The farm on which he resides has a fine house and outbuildings and he does general farming on an extensive scale. Oil has been discovered on the land and there are several wells in operation. In 1900 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Parrish to Miss Pearl Starr, a native of Iowa. To their union thirteen children have been born: William R., Jr., twenty-two years of age; Sada B., who is the wife of Albert Young, a veteran of the World war having served for one hundred...

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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1894 Hinckley Minnesota Forest Fire Deaths

The exact origin of the fire is somewhat indefinite; the one that visited Hinckley must have started in the region south of Mission Creek. Around this little village much of the pine had been cut. There was in the hamlet twenty-six houses, a schoolhouse, a small sawmill a general store, hotel and blacksmith shop. At the time of the fire there were seventy-three people living in, and adjacent to, this village; a great number of the population were away from home, having gone to Dakota for the harvest. The people had been fighting local fires for a month. At...

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