Surname: Owens

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

Read More

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

Read More

The Cherokee Revolt – Indian Wars

From the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia and Tennessee to Arkansas and their establishment upon the reservation allotted to them by treaty with the Government in Arkansas, they have, until the period of this outbreak to the narrative of which this chapter is devoted, been considered as among the least dangerous and most peaceable of the tribes in that region. But through various causes, chief among which has been notably the introduction among them of a horde of those pests of the West the border ruffians; these half wild, half-breed Nomads were encouraged by these Indians, as it appeared, for the sake of the liquor traffic. According to the official accounts of this attempt to reopen hostilities, it appears that on the 11th of April, 1872, it originated with a man named J. J. Kesterson, living in the Cherokee nation, near the Arkansas line, about fifty miles from Little Rock. On that day he went to Little Rock, and filed information against one Proctor, also a white man, married to a Cherokee woman, for assaulting with intent to kill him while in his saw mill, on the 13th of February. Proctor fired a revolver at Kesterson, the ball striking him just above the left eye, but before he could fire again Kesterson escaped. Proctor, at the time, was under indictment in the Snake District for the murder of his...

Read More

Biography of James W. F. Owens

JAMES W.F. OWENS. – This gentleman was the eldest son of the pioneer Thomas Owens, and came as an infant in arms with his parents to Oregon in 1843, his birthplace having been Platte county, Missouri. In 1853 he removed with his parents to the Umpqua valley, and, amid the beautiful scenes of that almost unearthly region, grew to a vigorous manhood. His only education was received during a six months’ term of school at Dallas; but, having a phenomenal memory, this laid the basis for his large information of later years. He was one of those men who devour books and entertain very positive opinions upon the important subjects of life. The free and withal romantic life of a stock-raiser suited his bent; and in that business he was very successful. Marrying Miss Nannie L. Stevens of Ohio in 1864, he made for himself a cozy home, and gathered about him the comforts of life. Four children came to bless his life; and his early prospects were equal to those of anyone in our state. he owned for a long time a ferry on the Umpqua river, but made his residence at Roseburg. Gaining the confidence of the people, he was elected to the Oregon legislature in 1874 on the Independent ticket. During those years he was also very active in the Good Templar lodge, and was advanced...

Read More

Biography of Thomas Owens

THOMAS OWENS, – Thomas Owens, a pioneer of 1843, was born in Tazewell county, Virginia, in 1808. His father, Thomas Owens, was born in Wyeth county, Virginia, in 1757, and with his family came to Floyd county, Kentucky, in 1814, where he lived to the age of ninety-four. Father Owens, as his Kentucky neighbors called him, was we are told, “A valued citizen, known as a good husband, affectionate father and kind master.” Thomas Owens, the subject of this sketch, was a born pioneer, having the courage to bring his wife and three children across the plains with the immigration of 1843. All those who crossed to Oregon in that year will remember the familiar, tall, raw-boned, athletic Kentuckian as Thomas Owens might be said to be. He was the man who knew so well how to meet and overcome every difficulty, that it became a common saying among his comrades, “only give Tom Owens a piece of wet moss, and he will make a rousing camp fire.” The immigration of 1843 was the first to bring wagons west of Fort Hall; and Thomas Owens, John Hobson (the present collector at Astoria), George Summers and Mr. Holly were the first immigrants to bring wagons into Oregon. Our sturdy pioneers were obliged, owing to the near approach of winter, to leave their wagons and stock at Walla Walla in charge...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Joana Owens

Interviewer: Byers York Person Interviewed: Joana Owens Location: Louisville, Kentucky Place of Residence: 520 E. Breckinridge St., Louisville, Kentucky The following is the life and traditions of Joana Owens, 520 E. Breckinridge St., Louisville, Kentucky, an old negro mammy who was born during slavery. “My mother and father was slaves, and there was two children born to them, my sister and me. We used to live at Hawesville, Kentucky, on the Ohio River. My peoples name was Barr, and their masters name was Nolan Barr. You know they all had to take their masters name in slave days. I will never forget how mean old Master Nolan Barr was to us. I was about fourteen years old and my sister was a little younger. We lived in an old log cabin. The cracks was filled with mud. My Mother done the housework for Master Barr’s house. My father and sister and me had to work in the fields. He had a big farm, and owned lots of slaves, and when the old master got mad at his slaves for not working hard enough he would tie them up by their thumbs and whip the male slaves till they begged for mercy. He sure was a mean old man. I will never forget him as long as I live. I don’t know exactly how old I is, but I am...

Read More

Biography of Thomas P. Owens

Almost a quarter of a century has come and gone since Thomas P. Owens departed this life but he is yet remembered as a substantial and valued citizen of Racine County, where for many years he actively and successfully engaged in farming. He was born in Wales, September 20, 1820, a son of Thomas Owens, Sr. In the common schools of Wales he pursued his education and was a man of thirty-one years when in 1851 he crossed the Atlantic to the United States. He immediately made his way into the interior of the country, settling in Racine County, where he remained for four years. On the expiration of that period he returned to Wales, where he spent four years and then in 1859 again came to the United States, once more establishing his home in Racine County. Here he purchased seventy-five acres of land which he continued to cultivate for a decade. He next purchased one hundred and eight acres and removed to that farm, upon which he continued to reside until his demise, his attention throughout the entire period of his residence in Racine County being given to general agricultural pursuits. In 1858 Mr. Owens was united in marriage to Miss Anna Lewis and they became the parents of five children: Thomas, who is engaged in cultivation of the old home place: Annie, who was born in...

Read More

Biography of Hon. J.S. Owens

HON. J. S. OWENS. Among the most esteemed and respected citizens of Marion County, Arkansas, there is not one who is a more pleasant, or agreeable member of society, a more thorough or sagacious man of business, or a more public-spirited and capable official than J. S. Owens, who is the present representative of Marion County, Arkansas, in the State Legislature. He was born in Alabama, February 19, 1851, a son of Thomas and Margaret (De Priest) Owens, who were natives of the Old North State. The Owens family came to this country from Ireland in an early day, the first member of the family here being the paternal great-grandfather, who was a participant in the Revolutionary War and afterward took up his home in North Carolina. The grand-father, Raymond Owens, became a resident of Carroll County, Ala., a wealthy planter, and is supposed to have been a soldier of the War of 1812. Thomas Owens was a young man when his father moved to Alabama. He married there and from that State enlisted in the Confederate service during the latter part of the war. In 1872 he moved to Marion County, Arkansas, and settled in Flippin Barrens, where he made his home until his death in 1887. He was a Whig before the war. His wife, who was a daughter of John De Priest, was of French descent...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Joseph Samuel Badgett

Interviewer: Samuel S. Taylor Person Interviewed: Joseph Samuel Badgett Location: 1221 Wright Avenue, Little Rock, Arkansas Age: 72 [HW: Mother was a Fighter] “My mother had Indian in her. She would fight. She was the pet of the people. When she was out, the pateroles would whip her because she didn’t have a pass. She has showed me scars that were on her even till the day that she died. She was whipped because she was out without a pass. She could have had a pass any time for the asking, but she was too proud to ask. She never wanted to do things by permission. Birth “I was born in 1864. I was born right here in Dallas County. Some of the most prominent people in this state came from there. I was born on Thursday, in the morning at three o’clock, May the twelfth. My mother has told me that so often, I have it memorized. Persistence of Slave Customs “While I was a slave and was born close to the end of the Civil War, I remember seeing many of the soldiers down here. I remember much of the treatment given to the slaves. I used to say ‘master’ myself in my day. We had to do that till after ’69 or ’70. I remember the time when I couldn’t go nowhere without asking the ‘white...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of John Ralph Owens

Owens, John Ralph; dentist; born, Burlington, Ia., May 15, 1853; son of John James and Martha Ann Yocum Owens; educated, public schools, Burlington, Ia.; graduated from High School in 1870, salutatorian of class; received degree of D. D. S. from Philadelphia Dental College, 1875; vice pres. of the class; married, Cleveland, May 15, 1889, Louise Benton; issue, three daughters, Beatrice, Theodora, and Louise; enlisted in the Cleveland first troop of Cavalry, 1880; served twelve years, having risen to 3rd sergt.; member Municipal Ass’n; trustee Y. M. C. A., 1884; charter member Cleveland Dental Society, its third pres. and fourth treas., Society critic, corresponding sec’y; member of oral hygiene and education committee, starting the work of the care of children’s teeth in the public schools; member Northern Ohio Dental Ass’n, and pres. on its fiftieth anniversary; member Ohio State Dental Society, National Dental Ass’n, National Oral Hygiene Ass’n, treas. Ohio State Dental Examining Board; lecturer on anaesthetics, Dental College, Western Reserve University; member Geographical Society; trustee Utah Gospel Mission; member First Baptist Church, Rowfant, and Glen Valley Clubs. Recreations: Country Rides, Walks and Work; Camping and Fishing; built and occupied the first house on Ingleside Ave., now East 75th...

Read More

Owens, Carolyn – Obituary

Union, Oregon Carolyn “Kay” Owens, 89, of Union died April 17 in Madras following a brief illness. A graveside service will begin at 2 p.m. today at the Union Cemetery. Loveland funeral Chapel is handling arrangements. She was born in Coos Bay to Cecil and Elizabeth (Cramer) Brown on May 18, 1917. She married Russell Kullman in Cherokee, Iowa, in 1937, and then C. H. “Slim” Coats in Antelope in 1942. Kay worked in retail sales and did drafting for the aircraft industry during World War II. She was an accomplished clothing buyer and retailer. She is survived by her son, Bill Kullman of Culver; two granddaughters; two grandsons; and two great-grandsons. The Observer – Obituaries for the week ending April 21, 2007 Published: April 21,...

Read More

Owens, Viola J. “Mike” Mrs. – Obituary

Prairie City, Grant County, Oregon Viola J. “Mike” Owens,73, of Prairie City, Ore., died Monday, March 13, 2006, at Blue Mountain Nursing Home in John Day, Ore. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m., Friday, March 17, 2006, at Driskill Memorial Chapel. Interment will follow at Canyon City Cemetery. Survivors include three daughters, Kathy Moothart of Mt. Vernon, Connie Lee Carstens of Baker City, and Linda Phelps of Prineville; nine grandchildren and twelve great grandchildren. Contributions may be made to the Viola Owens Memorial Fund through Driskill Memorial Chapel 241 S Canyon Blvd John Day, OR 97845. Used with permission from: The Record Courier, Baker City, Oregon, March, 2006 Transcribed by: Belva...

Read More

Search

Free Genealogy Archives


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest