Surname: O'Neill

Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

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The Spaniards in Alabama and Mississippi

England, having lost her West Florida provinces by the victories of Galvez, and having the American Whigs, as well as the natives of France, Spain and Holland, arrayed against her, was finally forced to retire from the unequal contest. A preliminary treaty of peace was signed at Paris. England there acknowledged our independence, and admitted our southern boundary to be as follows: A line beginning at the Mississippi, at 31° north of the equator, and extending due east to the Chattahoochie River; down that river to the mouth of the Flint, and thence to the St. Mary’s, and along that river to the sea. Great Britain also expressly stipulated, in that treaty, our right to the navigation of the Mississippi River, from its mouth to its source. Jan. 20 1783: Great Britain and Spain entered into a treaty. The former warranted and confirmed to the latter the province of West Florida, and ceded to her East Florida. 1American State Papers, Boston edition, vol. 10, p. 132. But although England, by the treaty of 1782, assigned to the United States all the territory between the Mississippi and the Chattahoochie, lying between the parallels of latitude 31° and 32° 28′, embracing the same portion of the territory of Alabama and Mississippi, which lay in the British province of West Florida, yet it was not surrendered to us by Spain for years...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Margaret O’Neill, Mrs. John H. Eaton

To the student of social history few careers surpass in interest that of Margaret O’Neill. Born of humble parentage, she ran the gamut of social possibilities, exercising more influence over the political destinies of her country than any other American woman has ever done. Unlike other great belles who owe their fame to the universal admiration they evoke, Margaret O’Neill owed hers quite as much to the animosity she roused. Her cause hotly espoused by the President of the United States, her conduct made the subject of cabinet debates, she rose to fame as broad as the land of her birth, and later beyond the seas to a fame un-shadowed by enmity, though not dearer to her patriotic soul. Born late in the last century, she came to be a belle in so far as having beaux makes a girl a belle in the days when the native Washington girl had few rivals. The shriek of Fulton’s steamboat had not yet startled the world. The stagecoach was the universal means of conveyance, though the daughters of some Southern and Western Congressmen, from districts unfamiliar even with its lumbering proportions, ambitious to taste the pleasures of a season at the capital, used frequently to make the tedious journey on horseback. Her girlhood belleship had well terminated, indeed she had married and brought children into the world, before the completion of...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank O’Neill

The sturdy pioneer, capable gentleman and patriotic citizen whose, name heads this article is one of the leading agriculturists and stockmen of his section of Malheur County, being a man who has wrought with great energy and commendable wisdom in his efforts to assist in the up building and advancement of this section of the country. Our subject was born in the County of Antrim, Ulster province, Ireland, on May 10, 1846, being the son of John and Elizabeth O’Neill. He was reared on a farm and remained in his native place until 1866, when he went to Scotland, and four years later was in Liverpool, whence on September 23, 1870, he embarked on the “Harvest Queen.” a sailing vessel bound for the United States. After a very rough trip of thirty-eight days he landed in New York, thence to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and one year later went to San Francisco. In Sonoma County, at Visalia, and in Mendocino County, in that state, he labored in the lumber business. In San Francisco, on December 18, 1875, Mr. O’Neill married Mary Mullary, and in 1881 they came to Portland. “thence they journeyed by team to lower Willow creek in Malheur County and located a quarter section, taking up the stock business. Three children were horn to this marriage, Mrs. Annie Zahlor, Mrs. Mary Loran and Francis P. In 1882, very soon...

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Biography of James O’Neill

James O’Neill came to the northwest from the far-off Atlantic coast: nor have his travels been limited by his journey across the continent, for he spent some time among the mountains in the distant south. He was born in Rondout, New York, May 6, 1861 his parents being Patrick and Hannah (Mullroy) O’Neill, natives of Ireland. Both crossed the Atlantic to the United States in childhood, and were reared, educated and married in the Empire state. The father, who was a tanner by trade, died when our subject was only about five years old leaving the mother to care for her five small children. She lived to be fifty-five years of age and departed this life in Jarmyn, Pennsylvania. When a mere lad of seven summers James O’Neill began to earn his own living in the coal breakers of Pennsylvania, receiving forty-two cents per day for his services. His youth was one of hard toil and his entire life has been one of diligence. In 1879 he left the east and went to the Black Hills, settling at Lead City, South Dakota, where he engaged in mining for a year. He then went to Tombstone, Arizona, where he followed mining for a short time, after which he made his way to the Coeur d’Alene country on the discovery of the rich mineral deposits there. Later he was identified with...

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A. O’Neill

2nd Lt., 3rd Air Service, 19th Co. Son of M. J. and Mrs. Mary E. O’Neill. Entered service July 27, 1917, at Richmond, Va. Sent to Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. Transferred to Camp McClellan, Ala. Transferred to Camp Greene, N.C. Sailed for Brest, France, May 24, 1918. Promoted to rank of 2nd Lt. February, 1918. Fought at Belleau Woods, Champagne Hill. Wounded in head and back at the Battle of Belleau Woods Aug. 20, 1918. Gassed slightly. Sent to Base French Hospital No. 4. Arrived in USA May 20, 1919, New York; returned on hospital ship. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 29,...

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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